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2006 Ttr 125

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Hi

I had been looking for info to make my sons ttr 125 have a bit more power, i read this sites recommendations which were bang on. I drilled out the stock filter box, took out the spark arrestor, changed the main jet to a 110 changed the pilot to a 17.5 adjusted the idle screw to 2 turns changed the spark plug and i also spaced out the muffler end baffle to 2 washers. The needle was a stock needle with no adjustment so i put a small washer under the needle to raise the needle height. We live in British Columbia the temp is currently about 5" C we are at 40 feet above sea level, although the bike didn't seem to produce a ton more power it did help and made the bike have a bit more snap. Anyways thanks for the site and the available info.

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No problem. Be sure to stick around for a bit.

As for the increase in power, you can only squeeze so much water out of a rock if you know what I mean...

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Keep in mind More mods more power = less reliability and more likely to have failure. But if your like me go for it more fun .

If you really want to one of the best bang for the buck mods is to take some weight off the fly wheel .Possibly remove the counter balencer .

I was amazed at the difference it made a big difference seemed to have a lot more power ,quicker and tork.It'll definatly make the front wheel come up a whole lot more and quicker .

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my fav mod was the gearing (sprocket changes) stock on my 2007 was 13 / 54 and i went to 14 / 49 and man its a completly different bike, faster with all the same torque for the hills etc.

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my fav mod was the gearing (sprocket changes) stock on my 2007 was 13 / 54 and i went to 14 / 49 and man its a completly different bike, faster with all the same torque for the hills etc.

I would completely agree with this statement. Gearing makes a pretty big difference.

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Welcome to the money pit!:moon:

Fun bike, but one mod will lead to another... if you don't watch out, you could be into the bike for way more than it's worth...:p

Reliability wise... after we added parts the TTR somehow became more reliable? Guess it wasn't made to be MX'd straight from Yamaha - who knew?:ride:

-Kerry

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my fav mod was the gearing (sprocket changes) stock on my 2007 was 13 / 54 and i went to 14 / 49 and man its a completly different bike, faster with all the same torque for the hills etc.

Would it be the same but cheaper just to go with a 12tooth front sprocket?

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Would it be the same but cheaper just to go with a 12tooth front sprocket?

I've always wondered that myself... I think the benefit to going up in the front and down in the back is it keeps the chain the same length. I always just drop the front. Cheaper, easier, works just as good.

Some will also argue that it increases the bend radius of the chain thus wearing it out faster. To my knowledge there has never been a documented case where that has been proven to be true. It's just hearsay...

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Keep in mind More mods more power = less reliability and more likely to have failure. But if your like me go for it more fun .

If you really want to one of the best bang for the buck mods is to take some weight off the fly wheel .Possibly remove the counter balencer .

I was amazed at the difference it made a big difference seemed to have a lot more power ,quicker and tork.It'll definatly make the front wheel come up a whole lot more and quicker .

I prefer the flywheel weight stock for trail riding, the stock weight helps to stabilize low end and lessen stalling at low speeds, making the ttr a great woods bike. If you want more power, or quicker, get a 2t:ride:

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I've always wondered that myself... I think the benefit to going up in the front and down in the back is it keeps the chain the same length. I always just drop the front. Cheaper, easier, works just as good.

Some will also argue that it increases the bend radius of the chain thus wearing it out faster. To my knowledge there has never been a documented case where that has been proven to be true. It's just hearsay...

:):banghead:

A smaller sprocket in the front will take away top speed which is not what he wants, he wants to increase top speed. this may help

smaller front sprocket = less top speed, more torque

bigger front sprocket = more top speed, less torque

smaller rear sprocket = more top speed, less torque

bigger rear sprocket = less top speed, more torque

hope that helps

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:):banghead:

A smaller sprocket in the front will take away top speed which is not what he wants, he wants to increase top speed. this may help

smaller front sprocket = less top speed, more torque

bigger front sprocket = more top speed, less torque

smaller rear sprocket = more top speed, less torque

bigger rear sprocket = less top speed, more torque

hope that helps

Alex, I think your confused. your info is correct but so is overdrives. stop laughing and try paying attention

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Actually a little bit of not paying close attention and a little bit of a misunderstanding. I was replying to the post I quoted. Reading my reply I see that I was even wrong about that. The explanation is correct but I assure you it's not needed. I have a very thorough understanding of the subject at hand, I just don't always proofread my posts. :)

It's all good.

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