Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

just dont have the balls?

Recommended Posts

i have been riding track for a while and i have rode trails for years when i come up to a jump and intimidating lip for some reason i just wont commit to it, any tip's?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you dont want to do it then dont do it!!! Dont forget why you ride... If you do want to do it then just work your way up to it (build confidence on smaller jumps). Stay in your comfort zone, but always try to make your comfort zone expand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Start small, find a small jump and learn to make the most of it, speed, preloading, bliping the gas in air to bring the front up, using the rear brake to drop it. Also table tops are a great if you come up short no biggie not like doubles or triples.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been riding for 7 years, I still hate jumps. I wont slow down for a jump on the trail, but I generally don't do doubles on the track. My body is my livelyhood, I can't afford to miss work. As long as you go fast everywhere else, don't feel like it's a lack of balls.

If you do attempt a jump, just don't wuss out on the ramp and coast over it. Your front end will drop and you'll be in for a violent suprise. It's important to read the lip, some jumps take more throttle than others just to keep the bike level in the air based on the shape of the ramp. When I was first learning to jump, I liked to practice flat drop-offs (usually a 3 feet or so, the loading ramps at some OHV parks work great). Once I got the bike to run level off of those, I started hitting the jumps with some more confidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

as some guys have said, dont do it if your not confident. the worst thing you can do on a jump is force yourself to do something your not comfortable with and do it half way. thats how you get hurt. unfortunately jumps are kind of an all or nothing, so start on something small that your willing to go all the way with, and take it from there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try to not shut off on the jumps, keep the bike rolling smoothly. It wont matter if your going fast or slow(Not snail slow). You wont nose dive and hurt yourself that way.Even if you hit the lip because your still on the gas it will keep the nose up. As your confidence grows you will start hitting the jumps faster and further.

I found that the best way to build my confidence.

That was the way i learned (still am!!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the fact that you're on here asking tells me you do want to do it so you need to forget about tryingto do everything and break it down. Realize that jumping can easily become just another part of biking and feels pretty much like just riding once it's comfortable - not a hold your breath and pray sort of feeling. Find a nice table with a decent face and spend lots of time on it, like an hour or 2 just going in circles. If it feels good then go hit some small double. Get comfortable in the air. Before long really anything inside 70 feet should be easy breezy. Take it a bit at a time and remember - big air for show, corners for doe. There's a lot more to riding that hitting big jumps all day. Personally if you're over 40 now may not be the time in your life to start "trying" jumping, especially when you already realise committing is an issue for you. There's too much at risk and way too many years of good biking left to start asking for injuries at this point in the game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't been riding very long, and when I did start, my only intent was to hit the trails. Next thing you know, a new acquaintance had taken me to a dirt track that he maintains. Nothing crazy, just some tabletops that varied in size, two sets of doubles, and so on. I was leary at first, especially being on a bike made for trail riding. But, after taking a few laps at a leisurely pace, getting familiar with the track layout and deciding what I wanted to avoid (doubles and the whoop section), I geared up and started hitting the tabletops. Before the day was over I was clearing them. As with the other responses. . . just take it easy and build yourself up to it. Once you start to successfully clear smaller jumps, you'll gain confidence and go from there. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed. If you can't commit, there's a reason. Get out there and enjoy the ride. Push yourself a little, but not anything that makes you uncomfortable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
just don't have the balls?QUOTE]

then grow some:p

JK just take it easy at first and sooner or later you will work your way up to bigger and bigger jumps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
as some guys have said, dont do it if your not confident. the worst thing you can do on a jump is force yourself to do something your not comfortable with and do it half way. thats how you get hurt. unfortunately jumps are kind of an all or nothing, so start on something small that your willing to go all the way with, and take it from there.

I think being able to clear all the jumps on the track that you are riding is an

extremely important part. Lot's of tracks have tables with a small step down

triple option. Either landing you choose, figure out how to land on the down

slope of the jump. If you are constantly landing on the flat, you will get

fatigued much faster than landing on the intended landing spot.

I used to be terrorized by jumps, but like everyone said just take it slow. You

can pace a buddy off the bigger jumps to gauge speed. It just takes time to

become comfortable. But once you can ride the entire track smoothly, hitting

all jumps, and maybe even learning how to kick your rear end out a little bit,

you'll be hooked. Track riding will be more enjoyable that you had imagined!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the fact that you're on here asking tells me you do want to do it so you need to forget about tryingto do everything and break it down. Realize that jumping can easily become just another part of biking and feels pretty much like just riding once it's comfortable - not a hold your breath and pray sort of feeling. Find a nice table with a decent face and spend lots of time on it, like an hour or 2 just going in circles. If it feels good then go hit some small double. Get comfortable in the air. Before long really anything inside 70 feet should be easy breezy. Take it a bit at a time and remember - big air for show, corners for doe. There's a lot more to riding that hitting big jumps all day. Personally if you're over 40 now may not be the time in your life to start "trying" jumping, especially when you already realise committing is an issue for you. There's too much at risk and way too many years of good biking left to start asking for injuries at this point in the game.

Hmm, guess that means my meager attempts to learn jumps enough that I can ride and not be 'surprised' when a little air time happens is all for naught??:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ya, what's this over 40 crap! Just use your head and don't try any "grit your teeth - uh oh here I go - roll the dice " attempts. I ride the woods 99% of the time but go to the track to practice among other things, corners and jumps... just do it incrementally. Just go easy... unless you look good in PLASTER!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been racing for 39+years and it bugs me that people still think that you need to take risks to go fast.

Speed is about about KNOWING what you are doing.

It's not a leap of faith.(pun intended)

You get experienced by riding and racing, not healing from riding and racing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmm, guess that means my meager attempts to learn jumps enough that I can ride and not be 'surprised' when a little air time happens is all for naught??:)

I was just throwing it out there to think about as his age isn't posted, I said it "may" not be the time to start trying jumping. I did not say that anyone over 40 shouldn't be on a track or be going big. There's tons of vets out there that are way faster than me. I have my own track and time after time the guys that get hurt are the more mature ones who haven't ever really jumped before but think it looks cool and for what ever reason they attempt it but won't commit so come up short and get hurt. Or they don't have the feel yet but insist on trying to jump into the rythm sections and it doesn't work out. My point was he should think about why he wants to do it, if he's motivated enough age doesn't have to be a factor. There's tons of biking to be had without going big and to me he sounded like the typical guy I see getting hurt. Just a thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't look at the lip. Memorize the terrain as your coming up to it. Then look past it to where you plan to go. In this case the SKY!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Proper suspension set up can be a huge factor when it comes to being confident or hesitent. If your bike is balanced and predictable off the jump face you will feel comfortable and more wiling to flow off the jump face....if your bike is kicking and/or has an unsettled feeling you're most likely not going to be willing to commit and flow off the face like you should.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its just like riding bikes when your 12 or 13. "you hit it first, no you hit first. shat, i'll hit it first"

and as luck would have it i was always the one hitting them first and also the one spending the most time casts and braces.

if you have to second guess yourself, its to big for you. i dont care what anyone on this board says, if you get a tingly feeling and think your trying it just cause "what the hell" your not going to make it.

also like stated before, table tops are your absolute friend to learning jumps. no chance of casing, you can roll over them, and they are very readable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×