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New Bike; Fix Suspension Before 1st Ride?

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I will be getting a new bike within the next week or so (99% sure it will be a leftover 07 CRF450R). At 230 lb, I know I need to replace springs, and will likely do that before I even get it dirty. My question is; I plan to get it re-valved; should I do this before I even ride it?

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If you are looking for a , new bike, be it a left-over 2007 and back, the first thing I do when i get it home is get all aftermarket plastic and maybe graphics. I take off the OEM plastic, box it up, and put it away until it's time to sell the bike. Also, I take the time to regrease all of the chassis bearings (i.e. steering stem, swingarm, linkage, etc.) as there is a light amount of grease used during assembly at the factory. And lube the control cables and route on an extra new throttle cable next to the existing one. This is a Baja-racer trick as it won't get in the way. You will wish you did if you go on a trail ride, get over 5 miles from the truck, and the original one breaks for some reason. Just a few things to start off with.

Now for the subject at hand. You will most likely need heavier rated springs as most bikes are sprung for a rider around 160-185 lbs. If you do chose to re-spring, make sure to check with a reputable suspension shop such as Pro Circuit, Factory Connection, Race Tech, etc. as you will need to adjust the dampening on both ends for the new spring rates. A lighter compression setting along with a heavier rebound setting on forks and shock will help to keep the bike handling fairly well.

Ideally, having the suspension revalved AND resprung for your weight, riding style, terrain and ability is probably the best thing anyone can to improve the performance of their bike. It can get expensive, depending on who you choose to do the work (generally $500 to $850 with all parts and labor). Eventually, whomever you do chose to have work on your suspension will most likely want you to use their springs in order to be able to guarantee performance of the suspension. That is if you do buy springs first and decide on a revalve later on.

I apologize if I am starting to sound like an "Info-mercial" but just want to see someone get the most knowledge they can before spending their hard-earned money on a depreciating investment such as a off-road bike.

But keep in mind that stock is best for alot of things on your bike, but you will benefit from upgrading your suspension. Now go have fun :p

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as you will need to adjust the dampening on both ends for the new spring rates

I find the best way to do this is to wrap a wet towel around your forks and shock its very effective if you like a damp suspenion or some people like to adjust their damping clickers .

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I take off the OEM plastic, box it up, and put it away until it's time to sell the bike. Also, I take the time to regrease all of the chassis bearings (i.e. steering stem, swingarm, linkage, etc.) as there is a light amount of grease used during assembly at the factory. And lube the control cables and route on an extra new throttle cable next to the existing one. This is a Baja-racer trick as it won't get in the way. You will wish you did if you go on a trail ride, get over 5 miles from the truck, and the original one breaks for some reason. Just a few things to start off with.

That is some good advice. I'm going to send my suspension to factory connection in a few weeks for a respring and revalve and I think I'll do all of this while the bike is sitting.

The revalve and respring is expensive, but what's the point in having a fast bike if its uncontrollable. I've ridden mine and it's sprung for a much lighter rider, its still fun but the bike just bottoms a lot and the suspension is much too soft.

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If you are looking for a , new bike, be it a left-over 2007 and back, the first thing I do when i get it home is get all aftermarket plastic and maybe graphics. I take off the OEM plastic, box it up, and put it away until it's time to sell the bike. Also, I take the time to regrease all of the chassis bearings (i.e. steering stem, swingarm, linkage, etc.) as there is a light amount of grease used during assembly at the factory. And lube the control cables and route on an extra new throttle cable next to the existing one. This is a Baja-racer trick as it won't get in the way. You will wish you did if you go on a trail ride, get over 5 miles from the truck, and the original one breaks for some reason. Just a few things to start off with.

Now for the subject at hand. You will most likely need heavier rated springs as most bikes are sprung for a rider around 160-185 lbs. If you do chose to re-spring, make sure to check with a reputable suspension shop such as Pro Circuit, Factory Connection, Race Tech, etc. as you will need to adjust the dampening on both ends for the new spring rates. A lighter compression setting along with a heavier rebound setting on forks and shock will help to keep the bike handling fairly well.

Ideally, having the suspension revalved AND resprung for your weight, riding style, terrain and ability is probably the best thing anyone can to improve the performance of their bike. It can get expensive, depending on who you choose to do the work (generally $500 to $850 with all parts and labor). Eventually, whomever you do chose to have work on your suspension will most likely want you to use their springs in order to be able to guarantee performance of the suspension. That is if you do buy springs first and decide on a revalve later on.

I apologize if I am starting to sound like an "Info-mercial" but just want to see someone get the most knowledge they can before spending their hard-earned money on a depreciating investment such as a off-road bike.

But keep in mind that stock is best for alot of things on your bike, but you will benefit from upgrading your suspension. Now go have fun :p

Thanks for all the tips. I do only MX, and will be starting off racing in a few weeks. I'm just getting back into dirtbikes, with last spring being the 1st time on an MX track in over 10 years. I replaced the springs early in the season. When I had the shock rebuilt towards the end of the season my friend made a valving adjustment which made it work much better. I've been planning on getting a new bike for a while. It isn't really a question of revalve or not, but more a question of timing. Would it be crazy to re-valve before I even break it in? I will be going over the bearings, and if I do the springs I'll have the forks all apart anyway, so that's why I was thinking maybe I should just get it done right away. The only downside I see is that I would have no baseline feel of the stock setup.

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Springs are good, but I don't understand getting a revalve on a brand new bike, unless you are going to use it for something other than its intended purpose (like using a full mx bike for slow single track trails). Surely OEMs do suspension research. Maybe you will like their settings and you can save a bundle. If you don't, you can always revalve later. I have had revalves done, and they can be great, but I have also ridden bikes with excellent stock suspension.

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boy this is a helpful thred, I was thinking the same thing with my 09 kx250. I know I need springs but I didnt understand the revalve on a new bike that works great. Good deal guys.

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Ride the bike "first." This is important. Go ahead and spend some time setting the sag and clickers the best you can. Now with this somewhat good setting, ride it and take mental notes of how it handles, digs in and bites in corners. You will be able to see what you like and do not like about how it handles. Only then will you be able to tell the suspension shop what you need done. If you can't, they'll just go ahead and give you the right spring for your weight and a new valve stack and let you figure out the rest. Keep in mind this is supposed to be custom work, not a generic upgrade. They can tweak the valve stack to your riding style and needs. It may even effect what oil weight they put in. All things work in concert. Go set it up the best you can and go for some rides. Then clean it up and send it to them.

When it comes to your skill level, be absolutely honest with them. I made no BS claims about my skill set when I sent them my suspenders a year ago....D rider who likes tight single track with lots of sand. I got something back I'm happy with as a result and I'm a slightly better rider because of it.

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Well, I just ordered a set of correct springs for my weight. I pick the bike up Friday after work, and there better dang well be a big box of parts sitting outside my house when I get home! I know from my last bike this is a must-do; leaving the jump with the shock bottomed out all the way down to the rubber stopper makes for a very unpredictable launch! So, I will be replacing springs before I ride it, but leave the valving alone for a few weeks.

This will be a dream job, since I don't need to clean it first! And I don't need to open the inner chamber either; I'll buy some of the same fork oil that is in there now, just so I have the same in both chambers for now.

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If you are not really racing for trophy's then don't bother. Ride it first and then decide.

Where and how are you riding?

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I would recommend taking it out and riding it to find out what you want fixed with the suspension, but don't go too long like that otherwise when you get the suspension re-valved, they will also include seals, bushings, etc. Adding another $100 to the bill for something you can do yourself when you do a re-build in 40 hours.

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If you are not really racing for trophy's then don't bother. Ride it first and then decide.

Where and how are you riding?

I'll be racing for a trophy in 2 weeks. This will be my first season racing, which is cool cause I qualify for 30+C. I ride only MX, and will be attending various district 6 races over the summer.

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My very aggressive plan I had to pick the bike up Friday, come home and do a quick spring swap didn't pan out. My van broke down (I may post in "what's your latest screw-up" thread:bonk: ), and I had to really hustle to fix it, while trying to do work at the same time. I left work @ 5:30, not 2:00 like I had planned, so by the time I got home all I had time to do was mount hour meter and put extra oil on air-filter. The only adjustment I did was let some air out of the tires. Didn't measure/adjust sag, touch a clicker, etc. Even like that I was putting in some very good lap times (for me anyway). Next week I'll see how it works with the new FC springs I received Friday.

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