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Removing Anodizing?

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I got this sprocket for my pitbike that is anodized black. My rims are also black and I just do not like the look of the black sprocket, and black rim. I have a can of aircraft stripper, does anyone know if that will take off the anodizing? Or is their another home friendly way of doing this? Thanks for your help.

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A few years back I used easy off oven cleaner to take the gold anodizing off my banshee rims,

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I actually should have googled this first, I found out that the most effecient way to remove anodizing is with some lye mixed with water. I also heard about the oven cleaner working in some situations, I guess I will give that a try.

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I've heard easy off oven cleaner, but I had no luck with that myself. If you let it sit in purple power or another concentraited cleaner it will eventually come of. The fastest way is using lye, which can be purchased as toilet pipe cleaner (red devil brand or similar). It will say on the package if it is 100% lye or not. Mix it with water (wear gloves the whole time) and set the part in. It will bubble and turn dark, wipe the dark color off and the anidizing will go with it. Then you will have to polish the part to a desired finish.

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FYI.....Anodizing is not a coating, it is a chemical reaction with the aluminum. So any removal of "anodize" is merely removing the dye if any. If that's your goal then there you go otherwise in order to remove anodize you have to "strip it" (acid bath) which will remove the anodize however it will also remove a layer of aluminum as well. Depending on how much they let it sit in the tank depends on how much metal is removed.

Hope this helps

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Definitely use some kind of a chemical bath, after all that is how the process is done. Rezrider is correct that it will take a layer of aluminum off, but in your case if you let it sit just long enough to take the surface color off there will be no compromise. I have seen 3/16 inch thick aluminum that has been eaten away until it was literally paper thin, this was the acid bath method. I dont know if lye will eat the alu or not.

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Also, if you intend to just remove the dye color remember that there is still "anodize" on the aluminum. If you have plans on replating or coating it with something, this will need to be kept in mind, can't replate without stripping old ano off! Other coatings may not adhere for long!

Acid bathing will remove aluminum which means holes will become bigger and outside diameters smaller...only in the thousandths (+/-.001 or so) however, if there are any critical fits, this needs to be addressed.

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Anodize is a thin film of aluminum oxide created via an electro-chemical process to protect the aluminum. It is very hard and corrosion resistant, remove it and the aluminum has no protection. It is often dyed for cosmetic reasons, and the color can be changed. But it is very difficult and expensive to remove the oxide film without damaging the softer aluminum.

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FYI.....Anodizing is not a coating, it is a chemical reaction with the aluminum. So any removal of "anodize" is merely removing the dye if any. If that's your goal then there you go otherwise in order to remove anodize you have to "strip it" (acid bath) which will remove the anodize however it will also remove a layer of aluminum as well. Depending on how much they let it sit in the tank depends on how much metal is removed.

Hope this helps

Actually, anodize is a thin film grown on the surface of aluminum by using the part as a cathode in an acid bath. The layer is initially porous and can be died colors before it is sealed. To remove the color, you must remove the layer of anodize. You also need to remove this layer if you want to re anodize the part, and lye (as I recommend using) is commonly used in the industry.

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