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What's the best way to ship tires

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What's the best way to ship two Tires if I buy them from another TT member? Any idea on cost from NY to Maryland?:p

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about $20 ups is cheapest, but they MUST be in a box, or you'll get surcharged

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Last time I ordered from a company who just does tires, shipped them exposed and strapped together with all the labels adhered to the tires using UPS.

Got them fine, no problems.

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I've just wrapped them up nice and tite in strong packaging type plastic. Works great and is cheaper than mailing them up in a big box.:p

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this is the best way to ship tires:

tires.jpg

Safety First!

Probably bounce and roll if ever in an accident

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If you deflate them, they'll be much smaller :)

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Hey that looks like me except I don't have knobs. :)

Shave your head and then talk to me..

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I'd check with Fed Ex, UPS won't ship for individuals(probably different for businesses) unless its in a box which can easily run you $25+. Now if you have special "tire boxes" that don't take up extra size and space its probably fine, but if you're like me all your boxes are square and it can run the cost up. I believe Fed Ex will ship it however you want(without a box), they quoted me like $14 out of a box last I checked. Tires don't need to be in a box.

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Almost everytime I buy tires they come exposed with a label on them... from UPS. But I've never tried to do this myself, so maybe it is a 'business only' type thing.

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I've worked for UPS and I currently work for FedEx.

Put anything you're shipping in a box, or at least a plastic bag (has to be heavier than a garbage bag, like 5 mils according to UPS) or you're likely to be surcharged.

No matter what you ship, pack it and tape it securely if you want it to get where it's supposed to go. I had a box of axes break open on me this morning. I don't like axes flying down chutes at me!

Even then, with FedEx, people put mounted car tires in boxes, often these are processed like regular unboxed tires and to my knowledge surcharged appropriately. (they require extra handling, thus the extra fee).

But bike tires in a box should be fine.

A lot of companies just pass the extra cost on to the consumer, although some seek special contract instructions to get around the fee. You as a one-time shipper won't have that luxury.

And if you'd be so kind, ship via FedEx, it may go through my hands and thus you're benefiting a fellow TTer.

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I wrote something for another forum and this is a good place to pass the info along to anyone else who's interested. It was written around Thanksgiving.

As I said in another thread, I work for Fed Ex. I am a "package handler" which is a non specific way of describing my job. I figure more people will avoid traveling this year and as a result may instead ship presents to their loved ones. On a daily basis I see lots of mistakes made by companies and this time of year, I see a lot of them from the general public. I'd like to give a few tips on the best way to ensure what you've shipped gets to it's destination in one piece.

When your package comes through my facility, it's handled by four or five package handlers, the rest of it's trip, which includes part of many miles of machinery, is fully automated. First it's unloaded, this is what I usually start off doing, but I may find myself somewhere else by the end of the shift. It goes down a gravity conveyor (roller line) to a belt. I determine if the package gets special treatment because it's smaller than normal, or any combination of too long, wide, tall or heavy or hazmat. This special treatment, except for too small, comes with a premium price. From there it's transferred to people who sort it to one of three other sections of the building. This person looks at the destination zip code and nothing else. The next person to handle it puts it on a really large, fast moving tray system where the bar code on the package is read. His primary responsibility is to make sure the barcode can be read by the machines. The machine decides which truck to send that package to, it comes down a chute and into a truck. Typically, the last person to handle the package loads it on a trailer, again, checking the zip code or scanning the bar code. FedEx wants you to do what ever you've been trained to do as fast as possible. Some guys handle a hundred boxes a minute. I usually handle between 600 and 1200 an hour, depending on what I'm told to do.

Packages typically get damaged because when loaded, the package is stacked to the ceiling of the trailer. If the packagaging happens to be weak, the packages above crush it in transit. The "wall" of packages then tilt forward or backward and when it's unloaded, bonks me on the head if I'm not paying attention or if I am paying attention, comes flying down smashing into the deck that's eight to 12 feet below the top package.

It's very simple to prevent this. We can load one package per truck, stuff the whole thing with styrofoam and transport it across the country. It's a little expensive to do this, I don't think most customers are willing to pay two or three grand to get little Johnnie's RC car to him.

Also, while I'd appreciate it if you use FedEx, this applies to almost all carriers.

I know more about UPS pricing policy because I was in "Revenue Recovery" when I worked there, so I was the guy who made sure you only had 30lbs in the package, not 215lbs like Catepillar tried to slip in one time. (it got sent back, Cat paid a huge fee to have a forklift wheel go nowhere).

* I'm all for recycling. However, when the cardboard box resembles a paper bag, it's time to send it to the shredder, don't try to tape all six edges together and expect it to survive a cross state journey.

* If you reuse a box, put the new label over the old label. Even if it's for a different carrier. (explained later) The machines which read the bar codes are dumb. They read what ever barcode they can find and if the previous code still exists in the system, your package may come back to you, at the very least, it will take more time for it to arrive. Don't waste your time scribbling over the barcode, the machines will read it anyway.

* Gravity can not read, it doesn't care how many fragile stickers you put on the box, use significant amounts of newspaper, styrofoam peanuts or any other stiff but flexible packaging material. "Fragile" is a French word which means "poorly packaged merchandise". Pot holes and other road hazards don't care about what's in your box either.

* "Glass" and "Top Load Only" see Fragile. Glass is the word Paulie used on American Chopper when he shipped something in a box too small and the box wouldn't close. Fortunately for him, it was not glass.

* Use decent packaging tape. Do not use Duct Tape. UPS charges extra for duct tape. I do not know why, but they do. I am unsure of the other carriers.

* Use packaging, do not ship raw goods. This will always cost your more. It should be packaged in cardboard or heavy plastic, exposed wood, pallets and metal bands will result in additional charges. If you must strap something to wood for extra rigitity, put the cardboard on the outside of the whole thing.

* Use a box that's appropriately sized for your item, if it's too big and not enough packaging material, it's gonna get crushed or at the least split open and now I have to scour the truck looking for match box cars that are scattered all over. This also happens alot with clothing, the box is only 75% full and splits. I pick it up all the contents fall on the floor, I end up picking up and stuffing several dozen garments back into the box and wonder how you got size 26 g-string thongs. I then shutter at the "Shallow Hal" imagery.

* Don't stuff a large box full of books, anything over 70lbs with UPS and 100 with FedEx will cost a lot more than two smaller boxes with the same weight. The heaviest thing I've ever seen come through was the forklift wheel, the next heaviest was an engine block at 203. Both went back to the shipper. The largest item I've seen delivered was a refrigerator at 201. Oh, batteries, cell phones and florecent light balasts aren't heavy by themselves, but in a group they are very heavy.

* Don't use straps if you don't have to, these are used as handles by people who don't know -- i.e. the recipient --, then they break. They've also been known to cut hands, even the plastic ones. They get stuck in the machinery and they break. If they're metal straps, you'll be charged extra. Straps are not an alternative to packaging tape.

* Don't try to tape or worse strap several boxes together and save money on shipping, a lot of times it works, a lot of times it doesn't. When half your package is delivered, you're going to have a hard time getting the insurance company to pay for the half that didn't arrive if you do this. (insider tip: I still don't recommend this, but if you insist on doing it, put an address label on each box).

* Do not put the barcode across the box seam. If you must, (the box is small for instance) put the barcode so the lines are perpendicular to the seam. This way if the label is pinched or tears the barcode is still intact. It even works for the 2-dimensional barcodes much of the time. (by perpendicular, I mean the seam makes a cross through the bar code lines)

* Never wrap the barcode around the corner of a box, the machines can't read it.

* The best way to ensure the orientation of the box is to put the barcode on the top. However, packaging your item properly should ensure that the orientation doesn't matter. Do not use the "this side up" labels unless it really, really needs it.

* Put all the labels on the same side. Sometimes your box has some non-shipping related labels on it, when it's handled by people who need to read the label, they're going to look where the first label they see is, the guy who puts the package on the machine to route the package doesn't look very well, he sees a label, that's the one that's going to be used to orient the box, even if it's the wrong one. This makes the package go through the whole system again, possibly delaying your package.

* On occasion, the barcode on your package is not in the system. If this is the case, it's sent to people who scan the barcode and type the zipcode in. If you put a FedEx label on a box that also has a UPS label and the UPS label's zipcode is different from the FedEx one, it's possible for the package to go to the wrong place. Always place new labels over old ones.

* We don't kick your packages, all are treated the same way, no matter what your write on them. The exceptions: HazMat, buckets, anything with wheels, anything "raw"/unpackaged, parts of the contents sticking out of the box, anything over 60" on it's longest side, oiver 30 inches on it's next longest side or over 24" on it's shortest side or over 70lbs for UPS or 100lbs for FedEx. Also, bicycles get special treatment since the parts almost always poke through the box and can't go on the automated system. All these will cost you extra for the special treatment, avoid them if you can.

A package that's too small, smaller than a shoe box won't cost extra, it is treated differently most of the time (except for USPS) from it's larger counterparts. You're not going to save any money by finding a ring-box and shipping it vs a box the size of a VCR tape. However, the ring-box has a greater likelyhood of being lost by accident, not unloaded and shipped across the country where it's then found, shipped back and delayed by several days.

* Lastly, while it's pretty rare that "overgoods", things that never find a home, are found, put a second address label in the box just in case the normal shipping label should get separated from the box.

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this is the best way to ship tires:

tires.jpg

I am not sure they make tires big enough for me to move them like this.

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I am not sure they make tires big enough for me to move them like this.

Actually, they do...

Gianttires_ontruck.jpg

No, I'm NOT trying to tell you anything... :)

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I'd listen to -dj-. He's probably shipped every part of these bikes at least once.

Almost everytime I buy tires they come exposed with a label on them... from UPS. But I've never tried to do this myself, so maybe it is a 'business only' type thing.

I have, and they will ship them for you that way but you'll be surcharged like -dj- said. And the surcharge will be about 50% of the shipping cost.

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I've sent large fenders for really cheap. Only downside is you have to drop off and pick up at the bus terminal.

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Funny, I refer to my in laws as a part of a car too, but not "fender".

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