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traction contol

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anyone heard of teams experiminting with traction control like a car. im sure that i would not be legal in ama but coming out of a corner pinned would be awsome. i dont think that it would be that hard to adapt to a bike to it to cut fuel or spark at a preset amout of spin.

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idk, i dont think it would be fun to ride if the bike stoped making power half way though the big sweeping corner because you had wheel spin. The best kind of dirt bike is the kind with the fewest electric gadgets imo. The more elctronics there is the harder it is to fix, and the more thing to break

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i agree about the less things to break. i just think that you could adjust how much wheel spin you have but i do have it on my mustang and hate it. Its just a thought and you could pin it and just keep grabing gears

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Honda already uses a pseudo-traction control in their production bikes. That's the purpose of the three different ignition curves for first gear, second gear, and third through fifth gears.

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i agree with the wheel spin sometimes i have a cr250 that i trail ride some and at times i need to spin the back as fast as i can. so maybe some type of switch.

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I would think that a MX rear wheel is airborn, even if its only inches, too much for traction control to be useful.

But I was wrong once.

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"Traction control" is used heavily in "Superbike" racing, and a form of it comes stock on the current ZX-10. It's not what most people think it is, however, and it's job isn't to allow the rider to pin it while leaned over, and forget about the thing ejecting him into orbit. It's main purpose is to save the rear tire for the last few laps of a race, so the rider still has traction. It does this by various means... comparing front and rear wheel speeds to a point, but allowing variance, or using an algorithm to compare the rate of rpm climb to that in "stored" memory. Even in road racing, a certain amount of wheel spin is necessary, and seeing the front and rear tires have different circumferences, when the rider is leaned over, the rpm's climb due to the tire being shorter on it's side. If the TC didn't allow any variance between the two, the thing would cut power at this point, moving weight forward at the absolute wrong time, causing the rider to lose the front and crash. It would also shut off power any time the front wheel left the pavement(which happens a lot over the course of a race). In the best-case scenario, he would lose the ability to accelerate at 100%, costing him time. As I wrote, it's used more to allow the rear tire to stay consistent throughout the course of the race, more than anything else.

TC thereby still allows the rider to spin the rear, and he still has to be mindful of how much throttle he gives it. Even with cars, who's TC systems really do shut off power any time it detects different front and rear wheel speeds, it slows them down on the track. Therefore their systems are usually disabled or if possible, shut down during track duty.

I don't see TC being beneficial with MX bikes, because you don't suffer traction loss over the course of a race like you do in road racing. Wheel-spin is also used more in mx than road racing, as a lot of riders use it to make drastic steering inputs while cornering. Taking this ability away from the rider, would severely slow down his lap time(s).

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"Traction control" is used heavily in "Superbike" racing, and a form of it comes stock on the current ZX-10. It's not what most people think it is, however, and it's job isn't to allow the rider to pin it while leaned over, and forget about the thing ejecting him into orbit. It's main purpose is to save the rear tire for the last few laps of a race, so the rider still has traction. It does this by various means... comparing front and rear wheel speeds to a point, but allowing variance, or using an algorithm to compare the rate of rpm climb to that in "stored" memory. Even in road racing, a certain amount of wheel spin is necessary, and seeing the front and rear tires have different circumferences, when the rider is leaned over, the rpm's climb due to the tire being shorter on it's side. If the TC didn't allow any variance between the two, the thing would cut power at this point, moving weight forward at the absolute wrong time, causing the rider to lose the front and crash. It would also shut off power any time the front wheel left the pavement(which happens a lot over the course of a race). In the best-case scenario, he would lose the ability to accelerate at 100%, costing him time. As I wrote, it's used more to allow the rear tire to stay consistent throughout the course of the race, more than anything else.

TC thereby still allows the rider to spin the rear, and he still has to be mindful of how much throttle he gives it. Even with cars, who's TC systems really do shut off power any time it detects different front and rear wheel speeds, it slows them down on the track. Therefore their systems are usually disabled or if possible, shut down during track duty.

I don't see TC being beneficial with MX bikes, because you don't suffer traction loss over the course of a race like you do in road racing. Wheel-spin is also used more in mx than road racing, as a lot of riders use it to make drastic steering inputs while cornering. Taking this ability away from the rider, would severely slow down his lap time(s).

+2 :)

I agree completely. Not only all those things, but would you want all the extra weight and undependability that extra components would add?

Try improving your riding, rather than changing the machine you're riding on to affect performance.:banghead:

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On a MotoGP or WSBK machine, it has it's place. The one thing it does besides what is stated above, is, by cutting engine spark and timing and making the engine "rougher" is allows the tire molecules more time to recover between power pulses. It's harder to slide a tire when you have to overcome friction. Once it slides, it slides easily. It works. Lap times are down and tires are lasting longer.

I wouldn't want it on a dirt bike because I see problems. I'm talking other than adding cost, weight and maybe not being able to fix it when something goes wrong. I like being able to work without special tools and scanalyzers. These sports are expensive as it is.

Woods riders need to be able to spin the tire to spin the bike around in a tight hair pin, point and shoot style. MX riders point and shoot too. MX riders also need the front and rear wheels to act independently for jumps to control chassis attitude while in the air. Not being able to adjust yourself mid-air would suck.

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