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xr600 kick back

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My mechanic has informed me that while kicking my motorcycle over, it kicked him back and put him in the hostpital with torn tendons or something. Has anyone ever heard of this happening or experienced it first hand? What causes it and how can you avoid it?

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a bad CDI - from recent experience on a 1982 XR250R will cause kickback, however BIG thumpers are notorious for kick back - there is a proper starting drill - that has been discussed many times. Truly he should of known better. His fault not yours or the bike.

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Do you use the decompression lever when starting it? It's there for a reason.

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It's never kicked back on me and I've kicked it a lot of times. I was just concerned about how common kickback was and how to avoid it. I have a pretty good starting routine which does involve decompression. I'm mostly curious about how it happens. What are the mechanics behind kickback. Knowing the whys of things can help to avoid risk.

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I "think" it is mostly due to..

1. not using the decompression lever to get the pistion closer to TDC.

2. Giving it a "half-assed" kick. Probably after trying a few times and your leg gets tired. Again, avoidable if you do it correctly.

Has anyone gotten a kickback using the correct starting procedure? I haven't.

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+1

not useing the manual decomp & giveing part throttle will do it almost every time.

Useing the manual decomp, a person should be able to start a XR600 or any large single while sitting on the seat.

If they suck at kick starting, maybe they should try to suck start it:smirk:

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I have only got a kickback once that threw my knee into the bar. But then again i hardly ever use the decomp. Just kick to the hard spot, one or two good kicks on half choke and its up and running

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What year XR?

The later models have a ratcheting decomp mechanism that opens the exhaust valve should the engine turn backwards. It can still kickback, but it's pretty wimpy. The older bikes can kickback pretty good since they don't have this system. My old 81 XR500 was really bad at that. It completely launched me off the bike on a few occasions.

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Yeah, put your bike year/model in your signature line so we don't have to go search through all your past posts to find out it's an '88 XR600.

That said, an '88 XR600 has an automatic compression release assuming the cam is factory. Aside from making starting easier, it is supposed to help prevent what happened to the mechanic. Maybe it malfunctioned or maybe he used some throttle trying to start it. My cam has no automatic release and I have only been kicked maybe twice....both times from giving it a little throttle.

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I have only had this happen to me a couple times on my XR600 and my CR500. Every time it was because I kicked it wimpy. Just kick it with some confidence, that's all. :)

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I too have an 88 and but I have a hotcam and not auto decompression system. If you give it any gas at all trying to kick it over on my bike it will kick back at you every time. Some times are worse than others. You don't need to hold the throttle open at all when starting these bikes. If he was a bike mechanic he should have known big bore singles kick back so don't feel bad.

I believe the mechinism for the kickback is when you dont get it over top dead center (even on the second revolution) the air compresses from the piston and kicks back as it decompresses thru the kick start arm.

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Yeah, put your bike year/model in your signature line so we don't have to go search through all your past posts to find out it's an '88 XR600.

So that's where you put your your bikeyear/model. As you can see, I am a "newbie". I'll get it posted right away.

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xjz......when starting your XR, use the kickstart to slowly move the piston about halfway through the compression stroke, let the kickstart back to the top and then kick it smartly. This process will relieve enough compression pressure and prevent kickback.

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I would advise using a riding boot when kick starting any big bore bike with the automatic decompression release removed. If one of these bikes kick back and catch your leg they can cause serious injury as well as broken bones. I read somewhere that a kick starter on a XR440R actually broke off and went through the rider’s leg after the bike kicked back.

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Creeky, I don't have problems anymore (just when the bike was new to me) because I use the starting procedure and the manual decompression release to get it over TDC and it doesn't kick back on me anymore. I even didn't think anything about it last night and kicked it over with my tennis shoes on and it started on the 2nd kick with no kick back (that could have hurt).

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a mechanic friend of ours tried to kickstart my dad's XR600 then. he stands 5'0 and probably weigh not more than 100lbs. he was teaching us the "proper way to fire up a big 4-stroke via kickstart". after many failed attempts, he got frustrated and went ballistic on the kick when all of a sudden it kicked back and threw him over the bars and he landed on his back! :)

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