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Trying to make my DR650 dirt worthy

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So far I have added

MT21's front and back. I am very happy with these tires although they only last 1200 - 1500 miles for me.

14 tooth counter sprocket. Working great, original gearing was way too tall for the dirt. I can still run 65mph no problem.

ATV bars "Moose" to add height while standing. Not sure about these yet, I just put them on and they feel very different. Not sure if I like the handling now.

Bark Busters . Saved my levers a few times .

What else should I do, I have a very limited budget which rules out exhaust for now. I need to do something about the back signal lights. I have replaced one due to a crash and had to soder the ground back on many times.

Any ideas are welcome.

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What else should I do, I have a very limited budget which rules out exhaust for now. I need to do something about the back signal lights. I have replaced one due to a crash and had to soder the ground back on many times.

Any ideas are welcome.

bash plate, GSXR can if u can find one, go on ebay get a set of 4 mini indicators for the price of 1 at your local shop. LED's are a better bet as they won't blow bulbs and the unit should be stronger but you need a flasher relay. I settled for 2 regular bulbs and 2 LED's with twice normal flash rate, when I smash up the front ones I just use my spares or order another set of 4

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- Definitely a skid. Get a nice thick one that mounts so the frame tubes won't get flattened by impacts. Then extend the plate back to the stock rear mounts. Nobody yet seems to make a decently thick plate that protects the cases AND goes back far enough.

- Acquire tools and supplies for trail/shop repairs. This includes a service manual.

- Drill your levers, and/or get some spares. (Shifter, rr brake, frt brake, clutch)

- Use a "dry" lube on the chain.

- Rimlocks, if you air down.

- Shave weight wherever you safely can. Free stuff...Remove the clutch safety switch, sidestand safety switch, upper chain roller, extra rear fender crap, and helmet lock. $ stuff...LED flushmount signals, plastic tank and cap, lightweight exhaust, light mirrors, DR250/350 or other lightweight tail, SM front fender, Buell or other lightweight headlight, and a Vapor. Avoid the heavy Corbin or Suzuki gel, as there are lighter alternatives.

- Set up the suspension for YOU, damping AND springs.

- Swap on a flatslide pumper carb and (DR350?) cush-drive 18" rear wheel. Until a new pumper carb is feasible, rejet and get an extended fuel screw. Open up the airbox and the header weld too. If mostly at altitude, I'd prefer cutting several round holes in the airbox, instead of the popular "3x3", so I can easily richen the mix in lowlands by taping/plugging holes.

- Sell your stock stuff to help pay for the next mod.

- Loctite/Anti-seize the appropriate fasteners and properly torque them.

- Grease all your bearings with marine-grade grease.

- Apply dielectric grease to your electrical connections, and make sure all crimp/solder connectors are heat-shrunk.

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I've got a similar setup. The most beneficial thing I've done to mine is getting the proper weight Eibach springs and a heavier fork oil; they made the most improvement offroad for me. The Eibachs are kind of a band-aid for the suspension, if you want to get serious you'll need to go forks and shock. But the new springs are well worth the cost/benefit.

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SM front fender

nononononono!!

did that on my old dtr125, mud just flies in your face, only good if using a did SM front wheel

other than that.... i want that bike!!!!

2nd that on the suspension also, it made mine far better to ride

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nononononono!!

did that on my old dtr125, mud just flies in your face, only good if using a did SM front wheel

i'm using the stock rims and acerbis supermoto fender and while it is shorter (I can see the front wheel easily if I stand up) rain/mud/dust/anything only gets flung up to about 20% down from the top of the headlight shroud, nothing flicks back onto me

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If I was going to prepair the DR for any real off road riding, and had a limited budget to stick to, the first item would be a heavy duty bash plate as mentioned by others, then the gearing to suit the type of terrain your riding in, and when you can afford it, upgrading the suspension would be next on my list.

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Kommando,

I do have a skid plate, forgot to put that on the list at first.

This is the first I have heard about anyone putting an 18 inch real wheel on the dr650, that would open up alot more tire choices.

Last Night I removed the extra rear fender crap.

Great idea about the spare levers, I have a spare clutch lever and will put it in my tool case on the bike.

Thanks for all the ideas.

Wolfdog,NVDESERTKID

Got the bash plate, and gearing.

About upgrading suspension, my fork seals are shot. I have an appointment with my local shop to replace them and my plan was to put heavier weight oil in them. Should I replace the springs while the forks are off? I need to get prices and see if I can afford it at this time.

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This is the first I have heard about anyone putting an 18 inch real wheel on the dr650, that would open up alot more tire choices.

it opens up more tyre choices but its a bit silly IMO, the last thing the DR needs is more rotating mass. I'd assume it handles and turns better with a 17" rear. The $300 or so on a new rim would be better spent on suspension and would be one of the last things you do to the bike to squeeze just that little more out of it.

First and foremost i'd go suspension over anything else but you said tight budget. Though if your getting the seals replaced anyway just drop the cash for some springs. If you get your piggy up to speed offroad like I do, and hit an embankment, big rut, woops, get ANY sort of airtime or even hit tree roots at speed you'll notice how damn hard the bike smashes into things, thats your suspension riding in 85-100% of its travel.

Do the springs unless your idea of offroading is

flat%20dirt%20road%204%20one%20half%20inches%20wide.jpg with a little bit of 72trail.jpg and you'll notice an enormous improvement

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Ok if you are about to do the fork seals, its definitely worth while digging deep to find the extra cash needed to purchase a set of .47 guage eibach springs and a set of gold valve emulators, this combination of goodies will transform your forks, you will notice the difference like night and day.

The emulators should come with instructions about drilling out the existing dampening holes in your damper rods, the spring guage I mentioned is the set up I would go to if you weigh more than 80kg, I weigh about 82kg with .46 guage springs and i find it a shade soft so im thinking of going to a set of .47 springs or .48 springs.

also the emulators are adjustable, so you can fiddle around and fine tune them till your harts content, Im runnig 10wt in mine, and will be using it again when I get around to upping the spring rate again.

It might be a bit of a stetch finantially this time around, I dont know your budget or the price of those items in the U.S. but its well worth the effort if you can scrap enough together.

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I was just on kientech site, looks like the fork springs are $100.

Sounds like it is worth the money. If my budget was not so tight right now I would not give this a 2nd thought.

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There is a cheap way around this till you can afford to go all out and get all the goodies mentioned earlier.

You will need to talk to some one that realy understands spring rates because you can cut several coils off your existing springs and replace what you remove with a spacer tube, the shorter your spring the stiffer it becomes, a suspension specialist will be able to work out your existing guage spring and calculate how many coils to remove, this is what we did as teenagers with no money, we were always anoying the local suspension specialist with low budget modiforcation requests, we were lucky he was a realy good bloke and was very patient with us, we learnt alot of cheap ways to achieve an otherwise expensive mod.

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Trying to make my DR650 dirt worthy

its easy...sell it and take the money and buy a WR250 or similar :)

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WOLFDOG,

I will ask my mechanic how he feels about cutting the springs and adding spacers.

Dansdr,

I do like the wr250, a kid down the rode from me actually brought one to a local track and did pretty good on it.

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As much as I like the DR 650 for what it is, its no woods wepon, if I plan on doing real dirt riding I use my RMX 250, I have had ideas of building a dirt only DR but at the end of the day Id be flogging a dead horse cos no matter how much money and trick bits you throw at it, its still going to feel like a pig in tight woods or real rough steep terrain due mainly to there weight, unless you love the challange of muscling an over weight thumper where most would not take one, if your focus is real dirt riding then you are best off getting something more dirt specific.

If your just doing the occasional light to meidium dirt work there are plenty of things you can do to the DR to make it feel alot more competent compaired to stock

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dirt worthy enough for me for now... :)

cleanbike.jpg

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If you decide to just put in new springs, and hold off on the emulators, the install is real simple if you decide you want to do it yourself down the road( you don't even need to remove the forks to install the springs). If you decide you want emulators you'll be getting a bit more advanced on the install.

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