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Need Advice on Sprockets, Chains, Old DRZ

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First let me say that I have searched and read several posts on this topic. I know about the loctite fix and plan on doing it. I'm just a novice at mechanics and need a little of your experience before I move ahead and do the wrong thing or spend money on something I don't need.

I have a 2000 DRZ with about 4500 miles on it that I have neglected for several years since I started riding a V-Strom DL650 . Last week I decided to dust it off and go through some basic maintenance. Long story short, I changed oil, oil filter, spark plug, flushed coolant, new air filter.

I'm now to the drive chain and sprockets which are original stock (now 9 years old). I started to clean the chain and noticed that the O-rings were deteriorated due mostly to age. So it's time for a new chain. The sprockets aren't that worn, but I know it's best to change them all out with a new chain.

Of course, now I'm thinking about changing the gearing too. I used to ride the DRZ for about 80% Hwy/20% Dirt, But since getting the DL650, it's more like 20% Hwy/80% Dirt.

So here's my plan and questions:

1. I plan on going with a new 15 Front 47 Rear Sprocket. It looks like this will give me a little more grunt in the dirt and still give me some decent highway capability. Does that sound about right for what I want to do? I think I can use the same length chain on this setup--right?

2. What size is the c/s nut and what are the minimum tools and parts that I need to remove it and install the new one? (Am I likely going to need an impact wrench to get the stock nut off? Gear puller for sprocket?)

3. I'm not clear on what's going on with the washer/O-ring on the c/s when I remove the sprocket. Is there an O-ring behind the sprocket? Will I need to buy a new washer and/or O-ring?

4. As for the chain, I'm planning on just a decent O-ring replacement. I don't want to spend $100 on a chain breaker/rivet tool set, but I know that's the easiest and best way. Right now I'm thinking to just buy a cheap chain breaker and use a clip type master link (I'm aware that riveting is better).

I just want go go once to gather all the tools and parts for this project. Any advice from those who have done this job to make it easier, quicker and less expensive would be appreciated. I know this is talked about a lot, so thanks in advance for just helping me out.

Any other age related maintenance items that I should definitely do on a 9 year old DRZ while I'm at it?

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You may want to flush the front and rear brakes with fresh DOT4.

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So here's my plan and questions:

1. I plan on going with a new 15 Front 47 Rear Sprocket. I looks like this will give me a little more grunt in the dirt and still give me some decent highway capability. Does that sound about right for what I want to do? I think I can use the same length chain on this setup--right?

2. What size is the c/s nut and what are the minimum tools and parts that I need to remove it and install the new one? (Am I likely going to need an impact wrench to get the stock nut off? Gear puller for sprocket?)

3. I'm not clear on what's going on with the washer/O-ring on the c/s when I remove the sprocket. Is there an O-ring behind the sprocket? Will I need to buy a new washer and/or O-ring?

4. As for the chain, I'm planning on just a decent O-ring replacement. I don't want to spend $100 on a chain breaker/rivet tool set, but I know that's the easiest and best way. Right now I'm thinking to just buy a cheap chain breaker and use a clip type master link (I'm aware that riveting is better).

1) That is my favorite gearing... you may eventually even want to drop to 14 in the front if you get even more dirt oreinted.

2) Its 30mm [thanks guys]. You should probably also get a cheap small 2 claw gear puller. Less than 10 bucks at a discount auto parts store.

3) Nothing behind the sprocket, should be able to just slam a new one one.

4) You don't need a chain breaker. A dremel, grinder, or even a drill with a stone will get the chain off pretty easy. I use clip style on all my stuff, I don't really recommend it, but its good enough for me. :)

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2) I think its 22mm, but someone else should confirm.

30mm

It's easiest to remove with a pneumatic impact wrench but if you're lucky, you can get away with a good breaker bar.

Remember to loosen the CS nut before you remove the chain.

Tipsy

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I had to get a tool to compress the master link side plate

when putting the new chain back on-

Motion Pro Mini Chain Press Tool #08-070-paid $25 at the dealer

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You may want to flush the front and rear brakes with fresh DOT4.

Good point. Now I just need to learn how to bleed the brakes! I'll do a search on that too. Thanks.

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You may also want to grease the rear swingarm bolt and swingarm, linkage and steering head bearings

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You may also want to grease the rear swingarm bolt and swingarm, linkage and steering head bearings

Yes. I'll add that to the list too. Easy and cheap. Thanks.

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If you're having trouble with the countershaft nut, just have a friend step on the rear brake and then you should be able to apply enough twist to remove the nut.

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Okay, since I'm in Utah, I drove 1/2 hour to Rocky Mountain ATV/MC and picked up the 15/47 sprockets, 112 link O-ring chain, and a link compression tool all for under $100. I went with their "Primary Drive" brand on all. Yeah, I'm cheap, but I really don't see me getting any more benefit by spending 2-3 times more for the name brand components. The stuff I got is as good or better than stock, and that's all I need.

Here's how the installation went this afternoon:

1. The c/s nut came off almost too easy. I bought a breaker bar and the 30mm socket, but didn't really need the breaker bar.

2. The sprocket came out too easy too. I bought a gear puller tool, but didn't need it either. It was unsettling to see how much play there was between the splines. I put on the new one with Loc-tite and it went on pretty snug. I hope the Loc-tite fix works.

3. The rear sprocket bolts were TIGHT! I had to apply some heat to get them off. Even then, I buggered up a couple of the nuts. I should have bought all new nuts and bolts. I put the originals back on, but I'll be replacing them.

4. When I went to put on the chain, it was obvious right away that it was going to be too short! With the wheel all the way forward, I was barely able to get the master link in, but the chain is too tight. I didn't put the clip in. I don't see any way that the stock 112 link chain would work with this gearing. I need at least one more link!

Are you guys who use the 15/47 gearing really using a 112 link chain? Am I missing something here?

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112 links should work with 15/47 gearing.

count the links on the chain. make sure your sprockets are correct.

chains only run in even numbers of links. ex. 110,112,114 that includes th emaster link.

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I use 15/47 on my dirt set with stock 112 no problem. I did have about 1500 mi on the chain the first time I tried it tho. PM me if you want sprocket bolts I have an extra set cheap.

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I double checked both sprockets and they are correct --- 15/47. Chain links = 112 including the master link.

The Rocky Mountain catalog say this about chain length and changing gearing:

[if you are] Adding two or more teeth to the front or rear sprockets [You should] Add two links for every two teeth added.

The stock gearing is 15/44 and the stock chain is 112 link. So by adding the 3 teeth to the rear, according to Rocky Mtn, I should be using at least a 114 link chain. This seems correct based on what I'm experiencing.

For whatever reason, this 112 link chain ain't gonna work for me. I guess it gives me an excuse to hop on my V-Strom and run down and exchange it for a 114 link chain. I can always cut out links if needed. I think I'll get a 14 front while I'm at it.

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I double checked both sprockets and they are correct --- 15/47. Chain links = 112 including the master link.

The Rocky Mountain catalog say this about chain length and changing gearing:

[if you are] Adding two or more teeth to the front or rear sprockets [You should] Add two links for every two teeth added.

The stock gearing is 15/44 and the stock chain is 112 link. So by add the 3 teeth to the rear, according to Rocky Mtn, I should be using at least a 114 link chain. This seems correct based on what I'm experiencing.

For whatever reason, this 112 link chain ain't gonna work for me. I guess it gives me an excuse to hop on my V-Strom and run down and exchange it for a 114 link chain. I can always cut out links if needed. I think I'll get a 14 front while I'm at it.

If you get a 14t for the front the 112 may work? Its smaller than the 15t. I dunno Im new to this too. Just what Im thinking

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If you get a 14t for the front the 112 may work? Its smaller than the 15t. I dunno Im new to this too. Just what Im thinking

The 14/47 gearing is stock for the "E" with a 112 link chain, so I'm sure that will work. I would just rather not go that low.

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I exchanged the 112 link chain for a 114 and finished the installation. Everything looks good. There's the right amount of slack now and enough room to adjust tighter when the chain stretches. Runs a lot smoother and quieter.

I think I'm going to like the new gearing. I can't wait to get in the dirt! I'm feeling a lot better about this old girl now. Thanks to all who offered help. :)

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Still need bolts?

No, but thanks--I picked some up when I exchanged the chain.

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