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Removing Old Clutch Cover Gasket

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This thing is ugly and stuck on real good. How do I do this without damaging anything or getting it in the engine?:)

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I use a single edge razor blade and take my time. If little pieces get in the engine its ok, its just paper, it will grind up and the filters will catch it.

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I just can't get all of the old gasket off. My hands are too big to get the razor on every part of it. Most of the old gasket is gone but I can't get it down to the metal. Is it ok to leave some of the old gasket there?

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there are some gasket softeners/removers too, but I dont know if I would use it on my expensive motor cases. I would get it all off.

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I'm going to try wd40 and soak it overnight. I heard about this on another website. Hope it works.

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I've used contact cleaner on a rag and a razor blade. One trick I used on a friend's bike was to have him heat the perimeter of the case with a heat gun then removed the cover. The gasket came off in one piece and was reusable.

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heat it up with a heat gun or a very good hair dryer.

it drys, separates from the metal, and becomes brittle. then it comes off by hand or with a razor.

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Even the smallest amount of gasket could cause a leak. I re built a 1980 suzuki and had many leaks from leftover gasket. It took some time, but I got it. I even used a dremmel on part of it, although I don't suggest that.

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One more item since it's subject related. I heard a lot about anaerobic sealant being used on KTMs when first coming here. Jeb told me any sealant is fine, as long as it doesn't get slopped into the motor for bearing and filter consumption.

Anaerobic sealer cures into a jelly or gummy bear consistency making it more engine and filter friendly in the event an excess bead gets injested. Also known as flange sealer it's able to seal surfaces up to .015" (permatex propaganda). It stays soft and pliable as well. I found some of this sealant in the screen filters on the first oil change.

For the clutch I still prefer to clean cases, spray 3M hi-tack on the gasket and stick it to the case cover, verify oil passages are clear, and install dry. When in doubt I fall back on the anaerobic sealant.

Permatex and locktite make it DJH can add more if inquired I'm sure.

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