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Re-ringing JE Piston

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Have my bike tore down so I'm re-ringing my JE Piston. Should I hone the cylinder? If so how and with what (ball hone, adjustable hone).

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Honing a plated cylinder is unneccesary, and pretty useless as well. A standard aluminum oxide hone is not capable of removing any material from a nicasil bore surface. At best it will help clean the glaze off, but the negative aspect is that it will slightly blunt the peaks of the cross-hatching.

All you need to do is clean the bore surface thoroughly with a Scoth Brite pad and warm soapy water. Dry it with a white paper towel. If the towel doesn't stay white, clean it again. If the cross-hatch is not clearly visible after cleaning, the plating is worn out.

Not to be disrespectful, but I never re-ring a piston. My time is worth too much to me for that. If I go through the work of tearing the engine apart, it's getting a new piston.

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Honing a plated cylinder is unneccesary, and pretty useless as well. A standard aluminum oxide hone is not capable of removing any material from a nicasil bore surface. At best it will help clean the glaze off, but the negative aspect is that it will slightly blunt the peaks of the cross-hatching.

All you need to do is clean the bore surface thoroughly with a Scoth Brite pad and warm soapy water. Dry it with a white paper towel. If the towel doesn't stay white, clean it again. If the cross-hatch is not clearly visible after cleaning, the plating is worn out.

Not to be disrespectful, but I never re-ring a piston. My time is worth too much to me for that. If I go through the work of tearing the engine apart, it's getting a new piston.

I agree with everything except that honing wears down cross-hatches. A hone will help deglaze a cylinder (no better than a scotchbrite pad), but running a hone through a nikasil plated cylinder will not wear down the cross-hatching at all. The cross-hatch has already had the rings and piston rub against it millions and millions of times.

I also never rering a piston, if I spend the money and time buying gaskets and rings, and tearing it down to the piston, I spend a few bucks more and give it a new piston and wrist pin.

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thats ridiculous you can absolutely hone a nikasil cylinder...I found using a ball hone on a drill works better than the stones on a honing machine...I've honed the cylinder on my 250f twice already using both and prefer the ball hone with a drill...You can and should hone your cylinder...the nikasil can damage expensive honing stones used for the honing machine so its more logical to use your own ball hone rather than pay for a shops busted set of stones used on your cylinder...Dont forget to Use oil while honing....

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I agree with everything except that honing wears down cross-hatches. A hone will help deglaze a cylinder (no better than a scotchbrite pad), but running a hone through a nicosil plated cylinder will not wear down the cross-hatching at all. The cross-hatch has already had the rings and piston rub against it millions and millions of times.

I also never rering a piston, if I spend the money and time buying gaskets and rings, and tearing it down to the piston, I spend a few bucks more and give it a new piston and wrist pin.

I didn't say a hone will wear down the cross-hatch, quite the opposite. A hone is not capable of removing any metal from a nicasil bore.

What I said was, a hone can blunt the peaks of the cross-hatch, by literally bending the peaks over (that info came from Eric Gorr's web site, so don't hold my feet to the fire for it). But no, it won't wear them down.

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thats ridiculous you can absolutely hone a nikasil cylinder...I found using a ball hone on a drill works better than the stones on a honing machine...I've honed the cylinder on my 250f twice already using both and prefer the ball hone with a drill...You can and should hone your cylinder...the nikasil can damage expensive honing stones used for the honing machine so its more logical to use your own ball hone rather than pay for a shops busted set of stones used on your cylinder...Dont forget to Use oil while honing....
What part of this don't you get?

A standard aluminum oxide hone is not capable of removing any material from a nicasil-composite bore surface. The plating is much harder than the hone material, by a couple of orders of magnitude. It takes diamond tooling to cut nicasil plating.

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I didn't say a hone will wear down the cross-hatch, quite the opposite. A hone is not capable of removing any metal from a nicasil bore.

What I said was, a hone can blunt the peaks of the cross-hatch, by literally bending the peaks over (that info came from Eric Gorr's web site, so don't hold my feet to the fire for it). But no, it won't wear them down.

This is possible with a brand new cylinder, but if the engine has time on it the peaks of the cross-hatch are not points, they are worn down just slightly to plateaus. Even though the nikasil is much harder than the rings, the rings still wear the peaks of the cross hatch as time goes on, especially when the cylinder is new and the peaks are still "pointy".

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I agree with everything except that honing wears down cross-hatches. A hone will help deglaze a cylinder (no better than a scotchbrite pad), but running a hone through a nicosil plated cylinder will not wear down the cross-hatching at all. The cross-hatch has already had the rings and piston rub against it millions and millions of times.

I also never rering a piston, if I spend the money and time buying gaskets and rings, and tearing it down to the piston, I spend a few bucks more and give it a new piston and wrist pin.

Alright, I think I'll just use the scotchbrite then. Only reason I'm re-ringing is because the piston only has 35 hours and is tore down for a valve job so I figured I'd re-ring it.

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What part of this don't you get?

A standard aluminum oxide hone is not capable of removing any material from a nicasil-composite bore surface. The plating is much harder than the hone material, by a couple of orders of magnitude. It takes diamond tooling to cut nicasil plating.

What part of this don't you get? You are wrong and you don't know everything so stop acting like you do...Take a cylinder with a "glaze" and run a hone through it...You will see fresh crosshatches from the hone...You need to learn to let some stuff go when you have no knowledge about the subject...A good mechanic knows a lot but a great mechanic knows when to keep quiet or admits when he doesn't know something...You haven't quite learned that yet have you?

And stop trolling my posts.

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What part of this don't you get? You are wrong and you don't know everything so stop acting like you do...Take a cylinder with a "glaze" and run a hone through it...You will see fresh crosshatches from the hone...You need to learn to let some stuff go when you have no knowledge about the subject...A good mechanic knows a lot but a great mechanic knows when to keep quiet or admits when he doesn't know something...You haven't quite learned that yet have you?

And stop trolling my posts.

A normal hone in a glazed cylinder will break the glaze and reveal the original cross-hatch, but will not cut it's own cross-hatch in the nikasil.

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A normal hone in a glazed cylinder will break the glaze and reveal the original cross-hatch, but will not cut it's own cross-hatch in the nicosil.

true but with the right honing stone you can hone a cylinder without a previous hone..even with a standard honing stone it can be done but would damage the stone....

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What part of this don't you get? You are wrong and you don't know everything so stop acting like you do...Take a cylinder with a "glaze" and run a hone through it...You will see fresh crosshatches from the hone...You need to learn to let some stuff go when you have no knowledge about the subject...A good mechanic knows a lot but a great mechanic knows when to keep quiet or admits when he doesn't know something...You haven't quite learned that yet have you?

And stop trolling my posts.

I'll say it one more time. An aluminum oxide hone CAN NOT cut any material from a nicasil bore surface, it takes diamond tooling to cut nicasil. The "new" cross hatch that you see appearing is the original cross-hacth that is being uncovered as the hone cleans the surface. Nothing more. And you can accomplish the same thing simply by cleaning the surface with a Scotch Brite pad.

If you don't like being contradicted, don't post incorrect info. And stop getting all butt-hurt because somebody corrected you.

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A cylinder with a "worn" crosshatch or glaze needs a light scuffing which can be applied with a ball hone or a red scotchbrite pad and a very thorough cleaning with hot soapy water and brushes.....Honing a nikasil cylinder without a previous crosshatch would require a diamond hone to do so...

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