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Rider weight - how much of a factor

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Hi,

Forgive me if this has been covered in other threads - I did search but found nothing. If there is already info here I appreciate the help finding it.

How much does rider height and especially weight really matter? I have ready many, many posts of small guys on big bikes and big guys (6'3" 230lbs or more) on small bikes like 250 4 strokes.

I am in the market for a new bike, and one of the most determining factors for choosing the right one as I've found on this forum is what type of environtment I will be riding it in. That aside, is my size, I'm 6'1" 275lbs, a major factor in my choice?

For me personally I think a 450 4 stroke will be a handful even on relatively relaxed woods trails and fire roads. Im just getting back on bikes after almost 20 years and will stick to mostly easy riding as a form of dirt therapy rather than competitive events. No plans to get on roads unless its a short jaunt from one trail to another. But I worry that a smaller bike, like the Husky TE310 wont be able to carry me up a hill.

Any advice is appreciated.

thanks

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Yes, it's ONE determining factor.

But your ability, riding style (agressive or putting?), and what type of riding (desert, track, woods, tight woods, etc) are much more important factors when selecting a bike.

I'm considered a little too tubby by most to ride a 200 2t (205-215lbs) but I find my 200 awesome and much more enjoyable than my previous 450R and 450X considering I prefer woods riding as well as the snappiness of the 2t.

And, fwiw, I'm much faster on my 200 than I was on the 4t's.

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I am 6foot4 240. I started with a 250f and it was not enough, could not jump anything big on the track, and could not climb hills for anything in the woods.

Got a 450!! PERFECT!!

You are a pretty big guy just like me!! Just get the 450!!

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I'm of the thought that if you're getting back into riding you'd want a light bike without too much power. A lighter bike with less of a punch will have less wear and tear on your body. Not to mention you'll be less likely to get into trouble too quickly. If you stick with it you'll be able to identify what you really need in your next bike and make a more informed decision.

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If you know anyone that has a 450 or 250 you could ride it to see if you want more or less.

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No offense but, diet and exercise. I've known 150-pound guys that rode 500's and fat guys that ride 250f's. If you could, you should see if you can ride some bikes to see what you like.

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275 is more than enough to tame the power of a 450. Just make sure you get the suspension done.

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Your biggest factor is going to be suspension. On any bike other than a Harley, your going to be bottomed out on the suspension. With the major spring change you would need, you would at least need to get the rebound circuit in your suspension re-valved. So definitely put aside $500-$800 for getting the suspension set up for your weight.

Now to the bike, it sounds like your just wanting to get back out there and cruz and get the hang of things without trying to race around? If that's the case a nice light 250F is your ticket, but with a big bore kit to give you the much needed torque. It's definitely a large improvement for a few hundred beans.

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I'm 6' 3" 185lbs [without gear] and people say I'm way to big for my 125. But I love it. Your best bet here is to ride someone else's bike.

But you also need to take in consideration of how much you are willing to spend on your bike in the long run. 4-strokes are time and $$$ and 2-strokes are very cheap and simple. If you do all of the preventative maintenance on both bikes like you should the 4-stroke will be more $$$. If you don't, then the 4-stroke will be more $$$ when it blows up. I know this is a little off-topic but just making sure you know what you are getting yourself into:thumbsup:

But like the previously poster said you will definitely need to set aside money for suspension. You will need springs and a revalve. Other wise it will be a very miserable ride probably. I mean I'm sure you will have fun regardless of the suspension, but if you set it up for your weight it will be a WHOLE lot better.

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Thanks guys for the info.

I should take this into the Husqvarna forum at this point, but I think theres a bigger risk that Ill regret getting a bike that I'll grow out of rather than into - especially at my size. Ive already decided what bike I want to get, just not the size yet. I'll try some more bikes this year in the exact environtment I will be riding my own in next year so that will be a big help as was suggested.

thanks

Happy trails

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I started with a CRF250R when I weighed 260lb, but because it was my first bike I didn't really feel the disadvantages until I started progressing and started riding track only. After that I decided that I should be on a 450. Last summer I rode an RMZ450 and loved it, I also lost some weight and rode that weighing 225lb. Now that the season is creeping up on me, I'm gonna be getting a new 450 with the suspention setup for me, this morning I weighed in at 216lb and within the next 30 days I have no plans of weighing more then 205lb, I would love to hit the 199lb mark by the time riding season starts up here in Canada. I believe for track riding, weight is a huge factor, but I wouldn't say so much for woods riding. However, 450 aren't hard to drive, or handle, and if your going to be climbing any hills, your definitely not gonna want anything smaller then a 250 two stroke. Most importantly, get your suspention done, and if you weigh 275lb right now, get it setup for about 230lb, that way you have something to shoot for as far as loosing some poundage.

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What's up with big guys taking 20 year breaks already???:banghead:

I'm 6'2" and pack around 250 lbs. Don't nag me about diets. I know a guy that's the same size as me (HomefinanceUSA) who has a TE250. I've ridden it. It's enough power for single track and even some open riding. That motor kills any 250F I've ridden with the intention of off road riding.

I went extreme since I thought my size was too big for a "smaller bike". First one was a KDX200 - enough motor but lame suspension and chassis once my skills came back. Next was a XR650R - good motor, went too fast for tight trails, way the hell too heavy for tree work. Next was a DRZ400 - really felt the same weight as the XRR but noticeably less torque of course. Next came a series of 250 smokers. I like my YZ the best and I never run out of power even at my size.

I'd say find the bike with the right motor and "feel" for you and then absolutely positively dump cash into new springs and a re-valve for your size ability and desire.:)

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Get the 450 and before you ride it, install the correct springs and get your sag set.

I am 6' and 193 lbs this morning. I was about 210 plus gear when I bought it and rode the stock springs about a dozen times. I installed the correct springs and it made a big difference when pre-loading jumps to get more lift.

The 450 does not weigh that much more than a 250 and you will need the power. Plus the 4S is easier to ride slow over a 2S 250 if you are just getting back into it.

Good luck and have fun!

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i weight 130 lbs and ride a 250 2-stroke, get the four-fidy it wont be that hard to ride. It will be pretty dificult at first but you will be haulin' biscuits in no time

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