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Best oil for shifting

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Hello all! I just bought 2 jugs of Rotella T and now I am worried about my shifting. Do you guys that run Rotella T see any change in your shifting or is there a better oil out there that will help the big monster shift better.

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I don't have an 09 so I don't know if the shifting changed at all but my 06 shifts the best with the Rotella T, out of the couple oils I have tried. Some of the 4 stroke specific oils, I could barely shift it. So I switched back to Rotella.

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I don't have an 09 so I don't know if the shifting changed at all but my 06 shifts the best with the Rotella T, out of the couple oils I have tried. Some of the 4 stroke specific oils, I could barely shift it. So I switched back to Rotella.

Sweet! That makes me feel better.

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I like the oil motoman45 00 is running.. shifts better than rotella for me... I dont like rotella at all are you sure you guys are actuallly trying other oils that are 4-stroke motorcycle specific oils? i have alot better luck with them.

I might try to run this bottle of rotella thru and see if I can get used to it, then switch back to castrol r4 and see if I notice a change this time around...

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I posted this in the wrong thread but here it is here this should help you feel better :)

Its been argued for years and the people that run it laugh at the people that dont..Why spend $35 dollars for a gallon of high dollar synthetic when you can buy the 15-40 Dino Rotella oil for $11.. It is proven that it holds its grade better than almost all motorcycle specific oils.. Years ago here were the actual test results and they dont lie sent to a lab..I been running this stuff for years..

Every couple of years Amsoil will publish a similar battery of testing against other motorcycle specific engine oils.

Their tests and reports should only be used as a guide, and should by no means be considered a definitive answer on what oil is best for the high performance motorcycle engine.

The testing would be much more convincing if it were done by an independent laboratory certified to perform such tests, but having been involved with oil testing procedures myself, I’m certain that the cost of such testing with so many products would be far too much for Amsoil to bear. The cost of purchasing the equipment themselves is probably FAR less than just one battery of tests would cost.

The testing is quite impressive to the uninformed consumer. However, many of the tests conducted are only relevant in a test environment, and are not always the tell-all of the performance in the real world. The REAL test is when the product is put to the test of being used in the application and situations it was intended for.

One thing you will never see Amsoil do in any of their fancy testing is to match themselves up with oils that are “other than” those of moto-specific types. And the main reason for that is there are many oils that are marketed to other niches, and for FAR less money, that will easily show equal or better performance than their moto-specific offerings.

One good way to discern between junk oil and a quality product is to test it in your specific application. I want to provide you with just a few oil analyses that were done after running various oils in a single engine. Specifically a YZ250F.

The testing of these oils run in the thumper was conducted in racing situations. Real world testing, as opposed to a controlled lab environment like Amway...errrr Amsoil provided.

I won’t go too fat in depth with the analysis shown, other than you should pay close attention to the viscosity and the associated wear metals.

When making comparisons of these real world reports, it is easy to see that oil does not have to be high-dollar synthetic to be good. In fact, some of the best performers on the shelf will be very inexpensive.

Another thing that these sort of reports show, is that leaving oil, ANY oil, in the sump for long periods of time is a very silly thing to do with a high performance thumper.

When we look for viscosity, we look to the following:

SUS VISCOSITY @ 210 \xbaF expected range for 50 weight motor oils= 82-95

SUS VISCOSITY @ 210 \xbaF expected range for 40 weight motor oils= 70-85

Viscosity numbers out of these boxes will mean that the oil is either thicker or thinner than what it should be. Thinner means it was sheared out of its grade.

Also in the reports, the pertinent wear metals are: Aluminum, Chromium, Iron, Copper, Lead, and Tin. We can pretty much disregard aluminum content, as a wet-clutch puts off lots of aluminum particles naturally. (another clear reason to NOT leave any oil in for long periods)

And lead can be disregarded, as race fuels typically have very high concentrations of the element and are not shown to be detrimental to the engine.

Accept for silicon (gained primarily from poor air filtration), all other components are additives that are placed in the oil on purpose.

Amsoil 20w50 Motorcycle Spec (Group IV Syn) raced/ridden for 60 miles in a 2001 Yamaha YZ250F.

INSOLUBLES: .2%

WATER: 0.0%

ANTIFREEZE: 0.0%

FUEL: < 1.5%

FLASHPOINT IN \xbaF: 365

SUS VISCOSITY @ 210 \xbaF: 68.4 (high-dollar synthetic sheared out of grade)

ALUMINUM 7

CHROMIUM 1

IRON 9

COPPER 6

LEAD 327

TIN 1

MOLYBDENUM 1

NICKEL 1

MANGANESE 0

SILVER 0

TITANIUM 0

POTASSIUM 0

BORON 0

SILICON 7

SODIUM 2

CALCIUM 3653

MAGNESIUM 11

PHOSPHORUS 886

ZINC 992

BARIUM 0

Castrol 20w50 Motorcycle Specific (Group III Syn) raced for 30 miles in a 2001 Yamaha YZ250F.

INSOLUBLES: .1%

WATER: 0.0%

ANTIFREEZE: 0.0%

FUEL: < 0.5%

FLASHPOINT IN \xbaF: 420

SUS VISCOSITY @ 210 \xbaF: 77.3 (another high-dollar synthetic sheared out of grade)

ALUMINUM 14

CHROMIUM 1

IRON 4

COPPER 1

LEAD 3

TIN 0

MOLYBDENUM 13

NICKEL 1

MANGANESE 0

SILVER 0

TITANIUM 0

POTASSIUM 0

BORON 2

SILICON 10

SODIUM 1

CALCIUM 1948

MAGNESIUM 4

PHOSPHORUS 828

ZINC 996

BARIUM 0

Shell Rotella T 15w40 (Group II Dino) raced for 45 miles in a 2001 Yamaha YZ250F.

INSOLUBLES: .2%

WATER: 0.0%

ANTIFREEZE: 0.0%

FUEL: 1.0%

FLASHPOINT IN \xbaF: 390

SUS VISCOSITY @ 210 \xbaF: 75.8(wow..an inexpensive dino oil that stayed in grade and produced low wear metals!)

ALUMINUM 16

CHROMIUM 1

IRON 5

COPPER 1

LEAD 116

TIN 1

MOLYBDENUM 8

NICKEL 0

MANGANESE 0

SILVER 0

TITANIUM 0

POTASSIUM 2

BORON 5

SILICON 5

SODIUM 1

CALCIUM 2522

MAGNESIUM 8

PHOSPHORUS 832

ZINC 958

BARIUM 0

Exxon Superflow 20w50 (Group II Dino) raced for 73.3 miles in a 2001 Yamaha YZ250F.

INSOLUBLES: .2%

WATER: 0.0%

ANTIFREEZE: 0.0%

FUEL: <0.5%

FLASHPOINT IN F: 405

SUS VISCOSITY @ 210 F: 81.7 (imagine that..about the cheapest dino oil on the shelf, stayed in grade and with low wear metals)

ALUMINUM 28

CHROMIUM 1

IRON 8

COPPER 1

LEAD 201

TIN 1

MOLYBDENUM 76

NICKEL 1

MANGANESE 0

SILVER 0

TITANIUM 0

POTASSIUM 0

BORON 4

SILICON 7

SODIUM 1

CALCIUM 1562

MAGNESIUM 6

PHOSPHORUS 689

ZINC 850

BARIUM 0

About the only benefit we can gain by using a full Group III,IV,V synthetic oil is its ability to withstand heat degredation for longer peiods of time. And when considering oil for a car or a cruiser bike, this should be considered.

But when it is evident that we need to change the oil out in a high performance bike long before it can get close to degrading completely, there is really not much benefit at all by using a synthetic. This can, and will, be debated heavily. But definitave proof on the issue will be hard to find. Espeically with real world analysis like these being published.

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Wow Hoss. Fantastic. Moral of the story: Keep running the Rotella and change it often like any oil. Been doing this since my first Thumper in 04:thumbsup:

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What does the analysis have to do with shifting?? Thats the subject of the thread... Like I said I went out and bought a 4 qt. bottle of this rotella eveyone swears by, and I put two rides on it. Both times I felt like the bike wasn't shifting as good. I am getting used to it but i feel like I have to do more precise and firmer shifts.

I said I wasnt going to use the Rotella anymore, but I decided today to drain the stuff with 2 rides on and throw in another quart of Rotela. I'll put two rides on this change, then throw in the last quart and do two more rides..

By then I will be accustomed to the shifting of the bike complelely.. Then im switching back to R4 or maybe another syn bike oil if I cant find r4. (i use different bike oils w.o. noticing a difference).

If i notice an immediate difference im going to post about it, if I dont notice an improvement when I switch back to the r4 im gonna definately stick with Rotella.

It just seems to me its harder shifting but maybe I'm imagining things, afterall its a new season I havent been on the bike much since last year...

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What does the analysis have to do with shifting??
Sustained viscosity with low metal wear, means less friction between metal parts. Incl shifting parts.

But best to just try diff oils in your bike. For sure I have better shifting with Shell Rimula-X (name of Rotella in Europe, Asia and Aus).

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We've been running Amsoil 10w-40 MC oil in my son's 09 KX450 race bike. I switched it to Rotella without telling him. He comes in at the end of the day and says "It's not shifting as good as it was, something is not right." I did not think it would make any difference. He has a Rekluse in it though. I'm going to switch it back and see if it is the oil or something else! :)

CR

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who runs a 20w50 in a 250f?? Why would you switch to a diffrent weight when the motor was specificly produced to run a certain weight? If you guys are happy with your walmart oil great! good for you guys! Ill stick with my R4, it works for me and I'm just stating my opinion just as you guys are.:)

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Shell has a 10w-40 in the same range called "ultra".

"Shell Rimula Ultra (E7) 10W-40"

There is also a 5w-30 oil available.

Maybe that would be a better viscosity to use in a motorcycle. It is a diesel engine oil for heavy road transports.

I´ll see if the local gas station has it... Maybe I can do a test...

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Shell has a 10w-40 in the same range called "ultra". "Shell Rimula Ultra (E7) 10W-40". There is also a 5w-30 oil available.

Maybe that would be a better viscosity to use in a motorcycle. It is a diesel engine oil for heavy road transports.

I´ll see if the local gas station has it... Maybe I can do a test...

Shell sell Rimula Ultra in Aus too. But not readily avail in 10L size. Last time I looked (a while back) I don't think there was much diff at all in the standards/manufacturer compliance for Rimula Ultra versus X. So Rimula-X it is for me. Besides, Rimula-X the best smelling dino oil by far. So it must be good. :)

As far as I know, viscosity is the one thing you never deviate from the manufacturer's recommendations. The last figure must match for the temps you run in. With the first figure (5W, 10W or 15W) the better is lower - if you live in a place with cold temps - and change your oil well before it starts to break down.

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I just wanted to comment about the shifting performance with the Rotella oil since I just did my first oil change on my new bike. I can certainly tell you that compared to whatever comes stock in the 07 KX450f the Rotella 15w40 Dino oil does in fact shift smoother. Clutch performance also feels good - no complaints with it. I have no idea about the R4 or other moto specific oils, but I did used to run Bel-Ray 80w Gear Saver in my 2-strokes - but nothing seems wrong with the Rotella as far as shifting performance is concerned.

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