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WR250R Engine Brake In...

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Ok...so i have been reading all up on Engine Brake in process. And i have narrowed it down to riding hard or going by the manual and taking it easy.

So i was wondering what you thought? or know is better.

Cause i just bought a 2008 WR250R this past Saturday and have not rode it yet waiting to see what is the best brake in process.(i did start it 3 times and let it run for 2 min though cause the mechanic suggested to before i start riding it.)

I would think that Yamaha engineers would kown best...as to how to brake in a brand new motor. But thats just me.

So please let me know what you think.

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I would not start it and run it for 2-min and shut it down, thats not enough time to get the engine completely hot. I would break it in like you will ride it, exactly, with these 2 conditions-

1- warm the engine up completely before you put it in gear to go.

2- When you do hammer the throttle, do not HOLD high rev's. Hammer it and let off.

Thats it. This is the way I would and did do mine. Im sure you'll get lots of different opinions.

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I personally feel that you can't go wrong by following the manufacturers break-in recommendation they know the machine better than anybody.

I forum (such as this) is probably not the best place to gain good information about breaking-in your bike since no one on here (I'm betting) really and truly has the knowledge and insight to be able to offer up any advice that would best Yamaha's.

I certainly don't have the stomach to rev the piss out of a new motor.

One thing I do is change the oil often (very often) during the first 1,000 or so miles.

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My last few bikes I've broken in the motor by riding aggressively. This is not pinning it from the showroom floor, but pulling pretty hard through a couple of gears, then letting it engine-brake to lower rpms. Biggest thing is to vary the rpms. I also change the oil between 50-75kms, and again every few hundred up to 1,000km. I get minimal oil loss once their broken in. On my Alaska trip on my Vstrom 1000 I didn't even have to top the thing up.

I can't say this is definitively the right way to do it, but it's sure worked for me and others that I ride with. Compare that to the number of stories of guys who followed the manual, and have unacceptably high oil consumption.

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Now we have a King Wolf... :)

I just rode mine normally and tried not to cruise it...

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I am in the same situation...

going Motoman with mine

Yeah i was thinking about going that way...

But it just does not seem like the right way. So i am just going to go the manual way try and keep her under 1/3 throttle and if i do go up in the rpms let her come back down.

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I personally feel that you can't go wrong by following the manufacturers break-in recommendation they know the machine better than anybody.

I forum (such as this) is probably not the best place to gain good information about breaking-in your bike since no one on here (I'm betting) really and truly has the knowledge and insight to be able to offer up any advice that would best Yamaha's.

I certainly don't have the stomach to rev the piss out of a new motor.

One thing I do is change the oil often (very often) during the first 1,000 or so miles.

Yeah this is the way i am going to go... if worst comes to worst i might lose 2 to 10 % hp...but it is worth it if it is going to last longer.

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I would not start it and run it for 2-min and shut it down, thats not enough time to get the engine completely hot. I would break it in like you will ride it, exactly, with these 2 conditions-

1- warm the engine up completely before you put it in gear to go.

2- When you do hammer the throttle, do not HOLD high rev's. Hammer it and let off.

Thats it. This is the way I would and did do mine. Im sure you'll get lots of different opinions.

Why wouldnt you just start it and let it idel for 2-3 min( i let i run for 3 min the last 2 times) totally starts/idle 3.

Cause the dealer machanic said to do it at least 2 times(start it up and let it run untill the radiator/engine is hot to the touch)

???

Just wondering.

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I've had great luck with all my engines doing this:

Check oil levels before first ride.

Warm up thoroughly, ride it hard for 15 minutes (not on the rev limiter ever), let it cool down.

Repeat several times.

Change oil. Enjoy.

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I broke mine in the same way I planned to ride it from then on. Change to a good oil after 300 miles. Maybe castrol r4. Works good for me. I'm in Asheville, NC.

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I gotcha. But that does not go with the manual way. So instead of taking my chance and losing the prolonging of the motor. I think i will stick to the 1/3 throttle for the first 300 miles.

But thanks for the info on how you did it.

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I personally feel that you can't go wrong by following the manufacturers break-in recommendation they know the machine better than anybody.

I forum (such as this) is probably not the best place to gain good information about breaking-in your bike since no one on here (I'm betting) really and truly has the knowledge and insight to be able to offer up any advice that would best Yamaha's.

I certainly don't have the stomach to rev the piss out of a new motor.

One thing I do is change the oil often (very often) during the first 1,000 or so miles.

Couldn't have said it better myself. Nobody here knows this engine better than the people who made it.

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Motoman: Put the motor under load often and through the gears to get the rings to seal properly. Done it on several bikes and worked great every time.

The factory "break in" schedule has sweet FA to do with properly breaking the motor in. It is the factory covering its ass in the event you grab a bunch of throttle and drive yourself into a pole on a bike you are not familiar with.

What exists inside a motor over the first few hundred miles/kilometers that requires it to be babied but then allows it to be caned after the first few hundred miles? Answer: Nothing. If there is a mechanical issue that will cause the motor to fail, it will happen inside the first few times the bike runs. Going slowly won't make that mechanical defect somehow miraculously fix itself.

Read motoman. Your motor's future performance depends on it.

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Motoman: Put the motor under load often and through the gears to get the rings to seal properly. Done it on several bikes and worked great every time.

The factory "break in" schedule has sweet FA to do with properly breaking the motor in. It is the factory covering its ass in the event you grab a bunch of throttle and drive yourself into a pole on a bike you are not familiar with.

What exists inside a motor over the first few hundred miles/kilometers that requires it to be babied but then allows it to be caned after the first few hundred miles? Answer: Nothing. If there is a mechanical issue that will cause the motor to fail, it will happen inside the first few times the bike runs. Going slowly won't make that mechanical defect somehow miraculously fix itself.

Read motoman. Your motor's future performance depends on it.

Why would it matter if you drive into a pole? No skin of there back if you dont know how to drive a bike. And they also give you a step by step instructions in the manual on how to start off...and they say take it easy.

So i dont know how the "breaking in the engine" would efect that?

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It is the factory covering its ass in the event you grab a bunch of throttle and drive yourself into a pole on a bike you are not familiar with.

That's a load of sh*t and you know it. Not every new bike owner is a rookie rider. The break-in schedule has NOTHING to do with running your bike into a pole. Stop spreading BS like that.

What exists inside a motor over the first few hundred miles/kilometers that requires it to be babied but then allows it to be caned after the first few hundred miles? Answer: Nothing.

Well, first of all there IS stuff inside your new engine that requires it to be "babied" as you put it. Have you not looked at the oil drained out of a new engine? There is plenty of metal in most ALL engines I have ever broke in. I don't care how well the parts are made or machined, some initial wear is going to take place until all the parts come into sync with each other once they are run. Not to mention things like casting imperfections and flashing. These little bits of metal will be floating around in your oil and could possibly get somewhere where they can do damage to a bearing or whatever. Going easy on your engine does not stop these things from doing damage, I'll give you that, but it could minimize the damage if it does occur. Frequent oil & filter changes are your best protection until the parts come into sync. The engine was designed to be caned as you say, but only after a proper break-in. Come see me 10 years from now. I'll be riding the same bike while you're in the garage rebuilding yours.

If there is a mechanical issue that will cause the motor to fail, it will happen inside the first few times the bike runs. Going slowly won't make that mechanical defect somehow miraculously fix itself.

I will agree with you on that point.

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That's a load of sh*t and you know it. Not every new bike owner is a rookie rider. The break-in schedule has NOTHING to do with running your bike into a pole. Stop spreading BS like that.

Well, first of all there IS stuff inside your new engine that requires it to be "babied" as you put it. Have you not looked at the oil drained out of a new engine? There is plenty of metal in most ALL engines I have ever broke in. I don't care how well the parts are made or machined, some initial wear is going to take place until all the parts come into sync with each other once they are run. Not to mention things like casting imperfections and flashing. These little bits of metal will be floating around in your oil and could possibly get somewhere where they can do damage to a bearing or whatever. Going easy on your engine does not stop these things from doing damage, I'll give you that, but it could minimize the damage if it does occur. Frequent oil & filter changes are your best protection until the parts come into sync. The engine was designed to be caned as you say, but only after a proper break-in. Come see me 10 years from now. I'll be riding the same bike while you're in the garage rebuilding yours.

I will agree with you on that point.

Motoman method suggests changing oil after the first 20 miles, then it is suggested to change again at 200 miles. For this reason. Lots of good reviews over at ADV about this method with nothing but posotive responses.

The factory does NOT care if you know how to ride a bike or you don't. You can be damn sure that if they instructed you to load up the engine through 4 gears, they would have a law suit coming their way the next day from the first person that DID wreck their new bike. I'm not saying that would be anyone here, but we all know it's happened before.

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Why would it matter if you drive into a pole? No skin of there back if you dont know how to drive a bike.

Your right, but it will be money out of their pocket. If they put in the manual to load it up though the first 4 gears and you get a speeding ticket or wreck and sue, they lose.

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You guys are missing the point. Yamaha (and everyone else who makes something with an engine in it), does not develop their break-in schedule the way they do for the protection of your bodily functions. It's for the protection of the engine they made. What the hell does crashing a bike or getting a speeding ticket got to do with proper break-in of an engine? I can still crash and get a speeding ticket following their break-in to the letter, so your statements make no sense to me. Don't you think they know that after you break it in you are going to flog the crap out of it anyway? So why don't they have warnings in the owners manual about that? There is nothing keeping you from suing them after it's broke in either, so what makes you think the break in is for your bodily protection? Do they tell you to ride slow all your life? No they don't. So what's the matter with going easy on it for the first (and most important) part of your engine's life? Answer: NOTHING.

Here's something else to think about. The idiot at the dealer who assembled your bike and prepped it for sale probably rode it before you did. No telling how he rode it or what kind of oil he put in it either, so that kind of negates whatever break-in procedure you have doesn't it? Go by a dealer at closing time someday and just sit across the street and watch them bring in the bikes on the lot at night. I have seen the salemen and other employees having a blast with some of those machines after hours. Scary stuff. That's why I got mine still in the box. Zero miles on it when I first rode it. Of course it helps to know your dealer in order to do this. Not all dealers will sell you one in the box as it can backfire on them if Yamaha ever found out one of their dealers did not prep the bike. They could void your warranty if something was not assembled correctly and resulted in your death or whatever.

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