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Front Wheel berring/spacer play

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I got some DNA rims and hubs a while ago for my CRF450R. I just noticed that the front wheel rocks about 2-4mm If I hold the bottom and top of wheel and push/pull 90* to the forks it rocks. (towards and away from the side)

This is absolutely not the forks, I can see when looking at were the wheel spacers meet the wheel bearing seal, that is were the movement comes from.

If I pull up or down on the wheel it does not do this, so it only rocks, the hole thing does not move.

What is wrong?

Could the spacers be worn down? Do I need new wheel bearings? Do I need new Hubs? Or maybee this is normal? Doubt.

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It would be nice if its just bearings. Anyone know what bearings work with the DNA wheels?

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I guess you could call them up and see what bearings they use. Or you could remove the old ones and go down to a local bearing supply shop and get some new ones.

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Just out of interest ... If the bearings are replaced ,but the spacer inside the hub between the bearings has some play is that still Ok?

The wheel with the new bearings has NO free play when its attached to the bike. Just thinking if that might be a problem.

Sorry for the hijack.

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Just out of interest ... If the bearings are replaced ,but the spacer inside the hub between the bearings has some play is that still Ok?

The wheel with the new bearings has NO free play when its attached to the bike. Just thinking if that might be a problem.

Sorry for the hijack.

The spacer between the bearings centers the inner races in the bearing when everything is squeezed together by the axle nut. If you over tighten your axle you can crush this, and the inner races will not be centered on the bearing. This can make the wheel hard to turn, and can damage the bearings. If the bearings are pressed all the way in the hub, and the center spacer is loose, you have most likely crushed it slightly, and should replace it.

DNA hubs copy Talon hubs, which have a different way of going about the issue. They use larger bearings, and a sleeve (with the inside diameter equal to the axle size) that goes all the way through the bearings and sticks out on either side, as seen below (this is the set up for the rear wheel, so there are 3 bearings instead of 2):

0123091700-1.jpg

This sleeve has shoulders on it for the inner races to sit against. This method is less likely to crush the spacer.

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Wow! that is a better response than I could have expected! Thank you KJ790Can I tap out the bearings with a blunt shaft (like a long 1.4" scoket extension) from the opposite side, or do I need a special bearing removal tool on these DNA's?

Side Note: Thse DNA wheels have held up great now about 60H's on them. Probably didnt maintain the bearings and that is whey they got as described.

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Wow! that is a better response than I could have expected! Thank you KJ790Can I tap out the bearings with a blunt shaft (like a long 1.4" scoket extension) from the opposite side, or do I need a special bearing removal tool on these DNA's?

Side Note: Thse DNA wheels have held up great now about 60H's on them. Probably didnt maintain the bearings and that is whey they got as described.

Since the bearings are junk and you don't have to worry about damaging them, you don't need anything special to get them out. It is best to use a press, but you can use a hammer. With those, I suggest getting two 4X4 blocks of wood, about 2 feet long each. Lay them down about 1-1/2 feet apart and lay the wheel on them (so rim sits on the wood and the hub is lifted up). Then heat up the hub around the bearing that you have facing down with a heat gun. Then hit on the center tube that is sticking up through the bearing that is currently on top. The tube should move down through the center of the top bearing, while pushing the bottom bearing out of the hub. When the center tube becomes flush with the inside race of the top bearing, you may need to get a socket or something to hit on to get it all the way though, but the bottom bearing should be almost completely out at this point. Then flip it over, heat the other side of the hub, and hit the other bearing out with a punch or pipe.

To put in the new bearings, put them in the freezer to get them cold, and heat up the hub. It is best to use a press, but a hammer can be used if you are careful. Put the first bearing in using a socket that matches the outside race of the bearing. Do not hit on the inner race. Once it is in all the way, find a socket that matches the inner race of the bearing, lay this socket down, flip the wheel over and set it on top of the socket so that the inner race of the bearing in the hub is sitting on the socket. Now you can put in the center spacer, if it goes in hard you can tap it with a hammer, since the inner race is supported by the socket it is sitting on. Then you can put in the other bearing. It is best if you could find something solid with the outside diameter matching the outside of the bearing and the inside diameter matching inside diameter of the bearing so you could hit both races at the same time, but without making something yourself, this is difficult to find. You can use a socket that matches the outside diameter of the bearing to hit this one in, but if it fits in the center spacer hard, you may need to alternate tapping on the outside race and inside race to get it to go in.

If you are worried about damaging the bearings, take some sand paper to the center spacers where the bearings sit on it. Sand it until it just slides into the bearings with very little force (by hand). Now you can just hit on the outside of the bearings without worrying about the inner races getting stuck on the center tube.

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Be sure to grease the new bearings before installing them. If they have the rubber seals on them, remove them and pack with grease.

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Just removed the bearings sucesfully but maybee waster $10 and a lot of time. Already ordered the new bearings.

Now I just ralized that maybee the play had nothing to do with the bearings.

Their is play between the wheels spacer tube (that also runs through the bearings). So the gap on one side between the axle and the internal wheel spacer tube is wear the free play came from. Unlike a traditional spacer that push on the inside race of the bearing, these spacers push onto the internal spacer. Seems that the engineering of this type of bearing/wheel/axle would require no free play between the internal wheel spacer and axle.

Too late now will have to install my new bearings.

Lastly I was lame and did not take note of the orientation of the internal wheel spacer, or the left/right wheel spacers. After much logic I think I have it figured out....

The smaller spacer that has 2 different inside diameters goes to the brake / axle nut side? The larger spacer with one internal diameter that can slide over both the spacer and the wider side of the axle(for proper fork allignment).... IS THIS CORRECT?

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UPDATE UPDATE!

Just called DNA and they confirmed my last post. The internal spacer's do sometimes got worn out agenst the axle and create free play.

They sell a hub rebuild kit for $28 that includes internal spacer, left/right spacers, Bearings and dust seals.

Canceled my previos bearing order.

I will give an update when the parts get installed, DNA is about an hour and a half drive away from my house so hopefully they get it shipped out quick, and I will be riding this weekend.

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UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE!

When it rains it puours. Just checked the rear bearings on the DNA wheels, Sure enough the brake side single bearing is super notchy feeling. Not noticeable while on the bike, but off the sprocket side spins free and easy, however the brake side is rough.

If you own DNA's check the bearings often.

Despite the trouble, still like the hubs and wheels.

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Well with any bearing you need to grease them. Did you do that when new?

Yeah if you say lame, look at what honda ships the bike out with as far as grease. Or yamaha or other manufacturer.

Again, you need to tear down the bearings and grease them when new. Solves a lot of headache down the road and wear.

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Yea Im pretty good about greasing things. In fact these bearings had lots of grease around them when I took them out, however being sealed typebearings, not sure how much got into the actual ball bearing area.

While im having fun with bearings Im going to check and grease all my bikes bearings.

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