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Showa Fork

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I'm changing the fork seals and the problem is that the outer bushing is climbing over the inner bushing and jamming. I know the bushings will need to be replaced but wondering if anyone has some tips on getting it to come apart as it does not want to move?

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heat and lots of small sharp tugs apart, sometimes it can take a hour to get them apart....

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Ok I'll keep doing that then, only had a few minutes during my breaks today to try. Didn't know if I was wasting my time, and should be getting more aggresive with it.

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be prepared that it might drive you nuts getting those suckers apart.

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I have had that problem with kayaba but not showa. If it is kayaba sometimes the inner bushing will pull through the outter. If this happens, take your slider tube bushing down and put it into the top of the fork. Then you can drive the inner bushing out from the top down.

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sorry you lost me on the last part of that? can you explain more?

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Got it apart today. Put an old triple clamp on so I could get a good grip. Was heating with heat gun to a little over 100 degrees Celsius and wasn't working so used the oxy/acetaline and heated it carefully and it pulled right apart. Then I used one of GM special tools for removing bearings, and with a slide hammer pulled out bushing and seal.

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I have had that problem with kayaba but not showa. If it is kayaba sometimes the inner bushing will pull through the outter. If this happens, take your slider tube bushing down and put it into the top of the fork. Then you can drive the inner bushing out from the top down.

ahh in your case the slider came right through the guide bush, i havnt been that lucky, mine have well and truly jammed inside each other, i had to use a soft hammer to push the forks back in, then heat and repeat till it came apart, half the teflon was stripped on the bushes, i now grease the outside of the seals to help when removing them next time, i believe the seals stick and cause all the trouble.They do come out easier this way i have found.

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ahh in your case the slider came right through the guide bush, i havnt been that lucky, mine have well and truly jammed inside each other, i had to use a soft hammer to push the forks back in, then heat and repeat till it came apart, half the teflon was stripped on the bushes, i now grease the outside of the seals to help when removing them next time, i believe the seals stick and cause all the trouble.They do come out easier this way i have found.

Yes, thats what I meant. It I have tried heat and it seems that they never slide apart as well as a showa. I have had the bushings slide past eachother many times and I was just telling him how to get the inner bushing out if it happens. To me on the kayaba, you might as well buy bushings when you order your seals sence the coating is almost always damaged when they finally let go.

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if you grease the seals and be careful i can get them out without damage, but i normally put new bushes in most of the time anyway.

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I have had that problem with kayaba but not showa.

Just the opposite here - never with a Kayaba but some with Showa

here's a comment on this from Ross Maeda (Enzo Racing) which he wrote on DRN quite some time ago:

I have also encountered this problem, mostly with KYB forks. The fact that the inner tube bushing is "wedging" itself under the outer tube bushing is self-defeating: as it wedges under the outer bushing, it gets tighter and more resistant to breaking loose. Heating the area where the bushing is seated is a good idea, but on KYB forks there is an O-RING between the outer tube and the "seal casing" which is swedged on, so too much heat can melt this rubber O-RING and basically scrap the fork leg. Something that must be taken into consideration is the fact that the flat washer between the oil seal and slide bushing is always deformed (conically bent) once disassembly is achieved. What does this indicate? I would say that it indicates that the OIL SEAL tightness may be providing the resistance that prevents easy slide hammer disassembly. I mean, if the bushing was doing all of the resistance, much greater than the oil seal, wouldn't the washer be un-damaged? Wouldn't it be flat?

So with this in mind, it would make sense to remove the oil seal FIRST, then slide hammer the bushing out. HOW THE HELL CAN YOU DO THIS!?!?! Well, it can be messy, but it can be done: As soon as you detect this problem, (the inner and outer tube wedge solid when slide hammering it apart), stop banging on them. With the fork spring out, fill the fork with oil at about half stroke, re-install the fork cap with as little air space inside as possible. Now you have a SOLID fork (from half stroke, if you want you can fill it at full stroke, but it takes more oil). Remove the dust seal, remove the circlip. Now put the fork tube in a hydraulic press and compress it. The hydraulic power of the oil inside will force the fork seal up and out as long as it doesn't have a horrendous leak. Once it pops up, oil should not blow all over you and the shop unless you left a huge air pocket inside before you screwed on the cap. Once the oil seal is out, try slide hammering the bushings out again. They should come out a lot easier.

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hmm i dont have a hydraulic press :thumbsup:

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nor do i and if, it probabely wouldn't be that big that a fork would fit in.

but you don't need a hydraulic press, some ellbow grease does it as well.

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