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KDX 200 Spooge

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I am looking to purchase a 2004 KDX 200. It is stock and seems to have had very little use. The original tires are in great shape. It does have, however, a bunch of spooge dripping down from the area that the pipe connects to the silencer. It is dripping onto the front of the swingarm on the right side. My question is this a result of running too rich, incorrect jetting.....or is there something more ominous I should be worried about. The bike is on consignment at a dealership, so I dont have much information about it other than what I can see.

Thanks for any thoughts on this!

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Try looking at the green site and not the orange site. Could be o-rings and the deal that connects the pipe to silencer, both are cheap. Probably running rich. If the prev owner didn't re-jet it should be rich, amny stock smokers are. Some spooge is ok.

PS you should get a KTM rather then a kawi. :)

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Thanks so much for your response. I did post this here is error, sorry. I'm green with envy, love the orange. Maybe someday!

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Spooge is usually the result of not getting enough heat into the pipe more than a rich condition. Being as the bike is 5 years old and in like new condition I'd guess it's only been putted around the yard and never really warmed up. If it starts and runs well (as I figure it does), and the price is right, I'd say grab it. Ride it like it should be and get everything warmed up, it'll quit spooging I bet.

Check out my garage and you can see what my '04 went from when I bought it to what it is now. Great bikes, I love mine more everytime I ride it.:)

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If you get it, I would repack the silencer and put zip-ties around the pipe/silencer junction.When you get the money, put a FMF exhaust system on it, and it will greatly improve the power.

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I bought a very briefly used 2005 KDX200 in late '05 for my son. Between his riding very easy, rich for our area stock jetting, and using factory recommended mix at first, it did the same thing......nasty goo all aver the swingarm.

After 3-4 tanks, kid got use to the bike and rode quicker (but is still pretty laid back most the time), I jetted leaner for my area and started running higher quality pre-mix (Golden Spectro, at their recommended, 50:1) These things combined really reduced that problem, but still had some after couple days of slower trail rides, so put some high temp RTV sealer around the joint, slid rubber ring back over and stopped it.

....and hey dirtbeater.....there's nothing wrong with a KDX :)

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Thanks everybody for your responses. I hope we can agree on a price because it looks like a great bike!

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if you have the stock silencer on your bike there is actually a bolt near the middle of it on the bottem side which is there to actually drain the left over "spooge" from your exhaust, I would try that just my input.

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Ditto on the posts above. It seems most kawis run rich stock, which is not a bad thing. It protects the motor. The junction between the pipe and silencer will almost always leak. Ditto on the hi temp rtv silicone. On all my two strokes I pull off the silencer, clean up everything, including the rubber seal, so the rtv can stick, then seal up the junction with the hi temp rtv and rubber seal. If you let it go, the spooge coming out the pipe to silencer junction can sometimes find it's way to the rear shock rod. We all know spooge sticks like crazy. After a while, spooge on the shock rod gets pushed up into the rear shock seal and make the shock rod seal fail, and you are doing a rear shock seal. Not to mention having to clean up black tar from the bike with solvent. But the spooge is normal for most two strokes, it is probably a bit rich, which isn't a bad thing to protect the top and bottom end of the motor.

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