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Buy a used bike… with a smoked rear knobby?!

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Help me decide whether or not to buy this pretty decent, late-model 250cc 2-stroke dirtbike.

In many ways it looks like a smart buy, BUT…

The rear tire is SMOKED! All the center knobs are gone, spun right down almost to the casing. It looks like the bike was used for drag racing. I doubt if it ever saw an MX track. :banghead:

So, my question is, what sort of “bad news” could I expect from a bike that has been run WFO, bang-through-the-gears-in-a-straight-line, over and over? :)

Anything specific I should look for?

Also…

Who does that to a dirtbike?! :banghead:

Thanks in advance...

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look at the underside of the rear fender. If you see little bits of rubber stuck to it then they were doing burnouts on pavement. If so walk away, far away. As for being drag raced, well its possible, and I would walk away from that too unless it's super cheap.

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look at the underside of the rear fender. If you see little bits of rubber stuck to it then they were doing burnouts on pavement.
The bike had been spray washed, so there was nothing I could see...

Is there something especially bad about burnouts?

If so walk away, far away.
Okay, but why? Are full-on, pinned throttle workouts unreasonably hard on a bike? (Especially a 2-stroke?)
As for being drag raced, well its possible, and I would walk away from that too unless it's super cheap.
When I say 'drag race', I don't mean at a drag strip, I just mean spinning the tire and charging back and forth on a dirt road or paved street -- showing off in front of buddies, between beers, if you know what I mean. :banghead:

I would just like to know why a bike that appears to have been used in that fashion would be a poor choice to purchase. Unacceptably high engine wear? Bent shift forks? Broken gears? :)

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the clutch could be goin bad if they kept dumping it doing burnouts thats the only part i can think of:excuseme:

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if the center of the bike tire is smoked doesnt always mean they were riding up and down a paved road A. owner did not have the ability to use the sides of the tires. B its flat everywhere and no berms to turn in and never been to a track. C never cared about changing the tire because they are selling it

D. yes it has been ragged on pretty hard

wont you tell us what year and model the bike is and how much the asking price is that could help us out more on telling you a fair price

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Burn outs are very hard on an engine, clutch and trans/drive train. Drag racing like you explained is not bad if you maintain the bike well, but a bald rear like that is a sign of poor maintenance.

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just look the bike over well, alot of use will show wear on sides of frame from boots and on clutch cover, ive worn tires down to nothing and doesnt mean its beat up. FYI cyclegear has dunlop 739 110/90/19 for $35 just pick one up if the bike suits you, just look for obvious stuff and take your time when searching for a used bike

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Is there something especially bad about burnouts?

QUOTE]

You've never been to a burnout contest, have you? You slam through the gears, then let it scream until something pops. Then everyone holds their beers up to the sky and screams "YEEEAAAAAHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!". A dirtbike MUST have air flowing through the radiators, and (at least at pits I've seen) they don't provide you with auxiliary cooling fans for the rads.

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..but a bald rear like that is a sign of poor maintenance.
That was a thought I had.

The bike looks like it was ridden until it needed a rear tire, then the owner gave it back to the bank as a voluntary repo.

It still has the stock front tire!

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if the center of the bike tire is smoked doesnt always mean they were riding up and down a paved road

A. owner did not have the ability to use the sides of the tires.

Certainly what it looks like to me. :)

B. its flat everywhere and no berms to turn in and never been to a track.

Yep.

C. never cared about changing the tire because they are selling it.

Yep, yep.

D. yes it has been ragged on pretty hard.

Drat!

wont you tell us what year and model the bike is and how much the asking price is that could help us out more on telling you a fair price

2006 YZ250 2-stroke. Nearly everything on the bike gives the appearance of a lightly-used, un-abused bike...

...except for that nasty-looking rear tire!

They want $3000 for it.

It will need a couple hundred bucks put into it before it's ready for the season (tires, chain & sprokets, a pair of grips, etc), but I was just wondering if the ragged rear tire could be a tip-off to some hidden, more expensive issues.

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just look the bike over well, alot of use will show wear on sides of frame from boots and on clutch cover, ive worn tires down to nothing and doesnt mean its beat up. FYI cyclegear has dunlop 739 110/90/19 for $35 just pick one up if the bike suits you, just look for obvious stuff and take your time when searching for a used bike
Thanks, Denn!

And thanks for the input from all you guys! :foul:

You've never been to a burnout contest, have you? You slam through the gears, then let it scream until something pops. Then everyone holds their beers up to the sky and screams "YEEEAAAAAHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!".
Agh! Say it's not so!

(It's like dog fighting. Dog lovers just can't let themselves believe things like that happen. :) )

Yeah, I've seen the youtube burnout vids. What a shame. :banghead:

I may have to buy that bike just to give it a good home! :p:banghead:

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wonder how many times mr. "voluntary repo" changed the oil - that's way more important than the tire.....

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wonder how many times mr. "voluntary repo" changed the oil - that's way more important than the tire.....
Hmm, yeah.

Good catch.

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I forgot if its a 2T or 4T, but if its a 4T can you listen to the valves open closing with a mechanics stethiscope? You can pick one up at harbor freight for like $3. Maybe you can use one of those to listen to the motor and find out how it sound internally.

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CaptDan, I'd offer $2500 for the bike and see if they bite. A new rear tire, chain, sprockets, and a new piston/rings/gaskets for that bike won't run you over $500. No offence intended, but a monkey can rebuild a 2 stroke engine. With a $500 investment, you'd have a bike that is all but indestructible, and if it does break, a rebuild is super cheap compared to a 4 stroke.

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I wouldn't mess with it... Just a good sign of poor maintenance. Like someone else said “take your time unless it's a hell of a deal” and you could break even parting it out. Burn outs really strain the engine. When race cars do it there is less resistance because of slick tires and lots of water. Some punk kid on a dirt bike with a knobby tire and no water = short life for the bike.

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me i would just look it over good and after hearing it run and riding it if everything else checked out ok it would be in the back of the truck. look at the oil and air filter and see what the look like also.

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To complicate your decision....I have a very worn rear tire on my DRZ with which I run harescrambles and enduros. Is it because I don't maintain the bike? No, it's because I am used to it being slick and feel that I would rather spend $50+ on another race/ride instead of a slightly better tire.

In my opinion, an air filter is a good indicator of maintenance practices. It's out of sight, but anybody who cares keeps them spotless.

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