Autism and Dirt Bike

HI everybody!

My brother has a son who has a form of autism, he his 9, he really like watch us ride our bike.I know you are expert with kids who ride and I really want if my nephew can has a dirtbike not for racing just for trail riding or garden riding.

Thank you very much

I know someone on here has a son. He had a hard time with the bike, but they got him a quad and he was doing much better as I recall.

I dont see why not, if your nephew has a hard time, then ditch the bike and try a quad or a gokart or something that he feels comfortable with.

Good luck!

How does he do on a bicycle? Good basic motor skills and balance will tell you. My son ditched his training wheels at 3 and had a ktm 50 soon after and did great with it. If his balance is good and he gets a good understanding of throttle and brake he should do ok.

There's an electric trials bike that might suit him also. http://www.osetbikes.com/

he is very good with bycicle he rides it without training wheels!

Maybe he can try an automatic dirty bike like lem with big wheels like 12/15?

some advice?

thanks

My neighbour's nephew has autism - he rides on a small china quad with his dad - he's probably about 8 or 9 but couldn't do it alone.

it all depends on how severe the condition is some autism cases are pretty easy to deal with, others not so much.

There's a guy here on TT whose son is mentally disabled (he calls him "Dave the retarded dirtbiker") do a search on here - he has a TON of info that you may be able to draw from and use to your advantage when it comes to dealing with similar hurdles in the autism world..

My neighbour's nephew has autism - he rides on a small china quad with his dad - he's probably about 8 or 9 but couldn't do it alone.

it all depends on how severe the condition is some autism cases are pretty easy to deal with, others not so much.

There's a guy here on TT whose son is mentally disabled (he calls him "Dave the retarded dirtbiker") do a search on here - he has a TON of info that you may be able to draw from and use to your advantage when it comes to dealing with similar hurdles in the autism world..

Thank you.My nephew can do a lot of things alone but is a lot shy to do all things!We're searching something easy to start like our dirtbikes so he doesn't feel strange or diffrent from us.

Like the others said, it all depends on how severe his autism is.

May I make a suggestion, get a bike with a remote kill switch and a throttle screw While he's probably not going to go hog wild with a throttle screw (let's you set maximum acceleration) the remote kill switch may save you from an incident you'd regret.

If he can ride a bike, he should be able to ride a dirt bike. It all depends and you won't know until you try. The quad may be easier, but the bike will be more forgiving if he spills it. I'd definitely try the bike first.

Also, remember safety equipment.

Good luck.

My nine year old son has Autism, it is in not too severe as he does speak and is in school with para support but he rides a polaris 90cc quad. He only lasts about 10 to 20 minutes because that is all of the attention span that he can muster up. He loves it. We must be in a large open area as sometimes his attention goes elsewhere for a moment or two. I would hesitate allowing him to ride in public areas with other riders around or expect him to do well on a tree filled trail but I enjoy spending the time with him and that is all it is about.

My 6 year old son has a form of Autism called PDD-NOS(pervasive developmental disorder- not otherwise specified). His main issue is communication and sensory processing. He can ride a bike, he plays soccer, basketball, backyard baseball, etc... I got him a quad(TRX90) For xmas of 2007. We spent a lot of time getting good at riding the quad and he loves it.

Like one of the guys above said... attention is is little bit of a problem. Sometimes I'll look over at him while he's riding and I can tell he's spacing out a little and the autism is kicking in. That's why I always stay in his sight so that I can redirect him if he starts to space out.

He's been getting real good at riding his bicycle and I always told him he could have a motorcycle if he he became an expert bike rider. He has been working really hard on his bicycle skills this spring and I know it's because he wanted a motorcycle.

Well... last night I broke out the JR50 that I have had for him. His head almost exploded! He jumped right on it and we started running laps up and down the driveway. This morning he asked me when he can start racing... hahaha... not yet buddy.

Anyway sorry for the long post. Long story short, every kid with autism is different, so you'll have to judge for yourself. Don't take ANYTHING for granted with the boy. Sometimes my son will get stuck on something and I'll realize it's because I expected him to know how to do something that a neuro-typical kid would intuitively know. Example: he used to fall off his bicycle every time he tried to get off it. I showed him step-by-step a better way to get off and he gets it now. It was something that a normal kid would have just figured out.

Anyway, good luck and have fun.

ps. that's me and my son in my avatar when he was a baby. He's been around bikes his whole life.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now