Off Camber Turns... what is the trick?

Okay, so I encountered my first off camber turn at an indoor track about a month ago, and it was one that is up hill, and breaks away. All of the guys on there 4 strokes just kept the throttle steady and they were up and around in no time. I just bogged my way up on my 125. I didn't want to fly up in 2nd gear, because it felt like the tires were going to break away.

Last weekend, I went to a local track, and they kind of had the same thing, but only tighter, and a little smaller. I know that the trick is to weight the outside peg, and to keep steady throttle control.... BUT...

thats easy to say when you're riding a 4 stroke. You don't have to be flying up the corner to have power... you have power all of the time, and you can keep the throttle steady. When I'm riding my 125, it doesn't seem like a good idea to shift into first and fly around the corner out of control. And bogging your way up it is WAY to slow.

What's the trick on a 125? What is meant by throttle control on a 125?

Thanks

BTW: I would love to buy a 250f, but being only 15, I could buy one, but when something broke, I would be done riding for awhile, becuase I wouldn't have any money to fix it. Thats why I'm still riding my junky 125.

might have to break the back tire loose a little to get out of the corner with out bogging it down.

Keep the throttle open (not wide open, but open enough to not be bogging) and then use the clutch to deliver the power to the back tire. Coming off a 250 2 stroke to a 125 I have had to learn how to do this. Your constantly adjusting your throttle position and slipping the clutch just enough to get all of that power to the rear tire in a controlled manner.

For example, when you are going uphill on your 125 and you feel it start to bog, or preferably right before it starts to bog, pull in the clutch slightly, open the throttle to keep the rpms up, then slowly release the clutch, (to get power to the rear wheel) while adjusting the throtte in order to keep the rpm's up. It's all feel and takes practice. That is what is meant by throttle control on a 125. It is bit misleading because you are not only using the throttle but to an even greater extent you are using the clutch to control both the rpm's and the power to rear wheel. This is definitely harder to do on a 125 that a 250f or 450f. I think everyone just starting off should first ride a 125 in order to work on "throttle control". It is one of the reasons why I got rid of my KX250 for a YZ125. Another reason is that they are just so damn fun! Especially if your a lighter guy like me (165lbs).

Keep the throttle open (not wide open, but open enough to not be bogging) and then use the clutch to deliver the power to the back tire. Coming off a 250 2 stroke to a 125 I have had to learn how to do this. Your constantly adjusting your throttle position and slipping the clutch just enough to get all of that power to the rear tire in a controlled manner.

For example, when you are going uphill on your 125 and you feel it start to bog, or preferably right before it starts to bog, pull in the clutch slightly, open the throttle to keep the rpms up, then slowly release the clutch, (to get power to the rear wheel) while adjusting the throtte in order to keep the rpm's up. It's all feel and takes practice. That is what is meant by throttle control on a 125. It is bit misleading because you are not only using the throttle but to an even greater extent you are using the clutch to control both the rpm's and the power to rear wheel. This is definitely harder to do on a 125 that a 250f or 450f. I think everyone just starting off should first ride a 125 in order to work on "throttle control". It is one of the reasons why I got rid of my KX250 for a YZ125. Another reason is that they are just so damn fun! Especially if your a lighter guy like me (165lbs).

Good advice, thanks... yeah, i know what you mean, I probably only weigh 130 with full gear on. It is fun on wide open tracks, but i hate riding my 125 on those slow technical ones, it seems like more work than fun... but I guess it just gets you better.

Hey, you went to Arkansaw MX last weekend right? Which corner was it you had trouble on?

Hey, you went to Arkansaw MX last weekend right? Which corner was it you had trouble on?

No, I was planning on it, but we ended up going to CMJ. I like riding at Arkansaw a lot, and I'm good at jumps, but I think CMJ is a lot more technical, so I went there, because I think it will make me a better rider.

I went ridin at Arkansaw at least 10 times last year, and I was kind of getting sick of it, so that probably had an affect on my choice too.

Maybe I'll go this weekend though, because Arkansaw is a pretty fast track, and I haven't been able to ride there yet.

Stop blaming your 125cc, its not the problem. You better get comfortable with the back tire being ''broke loose'' at almost all times.

haha I hear you on being light. My yz250 two stroke takes my 145 pound ass for a ride! I love that bike! As for the off cambers, like previously said, work that clutch man

The off camber at my local track is a left hander and pretty steep. Depending on how slick the dirt is, I usually start from the outside and cut in close, following the curve as much as possible. Also, for me, it really helps to get right up on the gas tank. Move as far forward as you can and try controlling that back tire. Good luck, their fun!

When in doubt...GAS IT!

put as much weight on the outside peg as you possibly can. it really helps the bike stick in the corners.

Keep the throttle open (not wide open, but open enough to not be bogging) and then use the clutch to deliver the power to the back tire. Coming off a 250 2 stroke to a 125 I have had to learn how to do this. Your constantly adjusting your throttle position and slipping the clutch just enough to get all of that power to the rear tire in a controlled manner.

How much wear does this put on the clutch? I've heard about this before and want to start trying it. I'm used to feathering the clutch out of some turns.

I'm not quite sure as I have not yet had to change my clutch plates yet. However, everytime I change my oil there are fine metal specs in it. So I assume that the cluth plates are wearing. When I got the bike the previous owner told me he just put a new clutch in it and so far I have at least 15 hours on it and no issues yet. Clutches are considered a wear item (like brake pads) and have to be replaced every so often. They are relatively cheap ($50-$75) and easy to replace. But in order to get the most out of your 125 and to always be "on the pipe" you are going to be using the clutch quite a bit.

I'm not quite sure as I have not yet had to change my clutch plates yet. However, everytime I change my oil there are fine metal specs in it. So I assume that the cluth plates are wearing. When I got the bike the previous owner told me he just put a new clutch in it and so far I have at least 15 hours on it and no issues yet. Clutches are considered a wear item (like brake pads) and have to be replaced every so often. They are relatively cheap ($50-$75) and easy to replace. But in order to get the most out of your 125 and to always be "on the pipe" you are going to be using the clutch quite a bit.

I just got my 125 (first 2-stroke/race bike) last June. So far this year I'm really starting to pick up the pace on it. I'm getting more aggressive and always trying to keep the power going. The only place I have trouble is a flat turn and an off-camber turn. I'm thinking I can "meter" the power around those spots, where as I'm already pretty good at judging where and when to feather the clutch.

Try standing through those off camber turns. You can put alot of weight on that outside peg as you push the bars where you want to go...

Start off slow and build up....

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