Any tips/tricks on doing breaks?

Ok, so I bought new pads, rotors, shoes and drums for my 93 f-150 4x4. Any advice or tricks on doing all of that? Anything that will ease my pain. First time I'll be doing this with no one to help (its me, my mom and my little brother) and I dont have the cash to have it done.

Do them one side at a time. That way if you forget how they are supposed to go back together, you can look at the other side.

Check to see if you can find the torque sequences to tighten the front bearings up. I have a 97 4x4 ranger and basically after you take the wheel off, you can take the caliper off which is easy.

To take the rotor off I have to remove a c-clip, two washers, outter locknut, locknut washer, and inner locknut.

Assumming it is very similar for your F150 which probably has a Dana44 axle. I would go to Autozone and ask them to print out the directions. It should include torque sequences as well diagrams.

But for a reference, my inner locknut is tightened to 16 IN/Lbs, then the locknut washer goes on, and then the outer locknut goes to 150 FT/lbs. Then the washers and everything else goes on.

I suggest you do one side at a time so you can refer to the other side if you have questions or forget what goes where.

You will need new rotors, pads, and probably bearing grease (you should clean and repack while your in there with Hi-temp grease). You will also need to get a new seal that goes on the back of the rotor to keep dust out of the inner wheel bearing.

Good luck and take your time. Its an easy and simple process, but a bit time consuming your first time. I can now do each side in about 20-30 min and most of that is cleaning and repacking the bearings.

Not a hard job, but I dont recommend you do it unless someone is with you who has done it before.

The reason is you are going to have to push the calliper cylinder back to install new pads, and this means bleeding out the fluid without getting air into system or pushing crap back up into master cylinder and/or that terribly expensive ABS unit.

Would also be nice flush that old brake fluid out too......again without overstroking the brake pedal or getting air into system.

If you get air into the ABS unit its nearly impossible to get back out without dealer tools.

BB

did you buy new springs and hold downs for your shoe's ?

its not a bad idea to get some cheap break drum tools from a parts store .

personally i have a bunch of fancy snap-on break tools but i generally just use a pair of side cutters for everything even on semi trucks they just seem to get the job done .

take you time and do one side at a time .

you should also pick up a can of brake cleaner ,drums and disc's are generally coated in a thin layer of oil or something to protect them you don't want this on there when you install your pads .plus you always get grease on the pads by accident some how .

make sure the auto adjusters on the drums aren't seized up they usually are if they are you will have to replace them or just disassemble them and coat them up with some never seize .

if you haven't pulled the drums before and since its an old truck be prepared to beat the crap out of it with a big hammer and heat the drum up with a propane torch .

on the rotors if you remove the outer bearing and then put the nut back on and grab the hub and just yank it towards you the seal will be popped out perfectly by the inner bearing and you wont have to replace it just hammer it back in . or you can pry it out with a screw driver and buy a new one .

in all likeliness you might find you need to buy wheel bearings and seals anyway .

its a good idea to try and find some sort of friendly neighbor or something that has done this before , or at least get a Haynes manual .

good luck , everyone has another stupid way to make drum breaks work usually more confusing then the last .

In the front end, start by blocking the rear wheels, and jacking up the front end and supporting it with something sturdy (large, solid wooden blocks or jack stands).

Now, remove the front wheels. Remove the outer lockout half by taking out the allen head screws, and set that aside someplace it's not going to get dirty. The inner half of the lockout assy is retained by a lock ring that slips into a groove in the hub (the ring expands into this groove). A small dental type pick with a sharp point works best for removing these. The rest of the lockout will slide right out if you thread in one or two of the lockout retaining allen head bolts and give a tug.

The caliper is retained by pins that slip in between the caliper and hub, they have to be driven out using a punch. I have an old beat up monstrous screwdriver for this task. They look like this:

353733.jpg

You can see in the pic how it's kept in the groove by the little tabs, you have to tap on them at an angle to compress the rubbers to let the tab slip over the retainer lips.

Once you get them out, look at them closely for cracks or rot, if they show this, replace them-they're about $7 each from NAPA. http://www.napaonline.com/MasterPages/NOLMaster.aspx?PageId=470&LineCode=UP&PartNumber=82471&Description=Brake+Caliper+Housing+Bolt+-+Front

You're going to need 2 C Clamps for this......with the old inner pad still in the caliper, use a C-clamp to push the piston back, and leave the clamp on there for now, and repeat the process on the other side. You need to leave the clamp in there, or when you go to push the other side's piston's back in, all you will accomplish is to extend the pistons on the opposite side. (I hope that's clear?) Before you do this, pop the cap on the master cylinder and make sure that it's not going to overflow-if it does, brake fluid removes paint. I use an old turkey baster to suck out excess brake fluid. Support the calipers with an old hunk of coat hanger or bungee cord so they're not hanging on the hoses.

Now, slip the caliper off (you may need to use a little prybar action). Now, inspect the caliper piston boots for cracks, tears, etc. If they are damaged, it's time for new calipers-they're not as bad as you think, about $20 ea for this truck.

Take the time to use some sandpaper to remove any corrosion, growth, gunk, etc from the area where the caliper mounts to the spindle and the V grooves and pins-these need to "slip" in order for the caliper to "float" and not bind.

Remove the outer lockout half by taking out the allen head screws, and set that aside someplace it's not going to get dirty. The inner half of the lockout assy is retained by a lock ring that slips into a groove in the hub (the ring expands into this groove). A small dental type pick with a sharp point works best for removing these. The rest of the lockout will slide right out if you thread in one or two of the lockout retaining allen head bolts and give a tug.

You're going to need the axle nut tool to remove the retainer for the bearing nut. It's this one: http://broncograveyard.com/bronco/i-19625_froogle.htm Napa should have them on hand for $20 or less.

You're going to have to swap your hubs onto your new rotors-drive the old studs out of the hub, swap the rotor over, and pound the studs back into the new rotors, being careful not to damage the stud ends. I use a brass drift for this, the brass will deform or "give" before the steel will.

At this point, you really should remove the spindle and grease the bearings inside, but you are going to need a slide hammer and special adapter to pull them off. http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00971585000P?vName=Tools&cName=MechanicsTools&sName=Automotive%20Specialty%20Tools&psid=SHOPZILLA01&sid=IDx20070921x00003c

Clean and regrease the spindle bearings, and get a new set of seals-the aftermarket seals are nothing but a small rubber O-ring, the OEM Ford ones are much better.

Clean and repack the wheel bearings using a good quality grease rated for disc brake temps.

Before installing the slide pins, put a slathering coat of brake slide pin grease (silicone base, not petroleum stuff) on the slide surfaces and pins that you cleaned earlier. DO NOT USE PETROLEUM GREASE, it will cause the rubbers in the pins to swell up and not allow the brakes to "float". This is the stuff you want: http://www.permatex.com/products/Automotive/lubricants/specialty_lubricants/auto_Permatex_Ultra_Disc_Brake_Caliper_Lube_Hi-Temp_Silicone_Formula.htm It's less than $20/bottle, and will last you for years-use it on your bike brake pins also.

Reassemble in reverse, torque specs are:

Spindle to hub nuts: 35-40 ft lbs.

Lockout retainer bolts (little allen heads) 40-50 in lbs.

Inner wheel bearing nut: If it's the ratcheting style retainer spin tire, while tightening to 70 ft lbs to seat the bearings, then back off the nut 90 degrees. Retighten the nut to 20 ft lbs.

If it's the two nuts with a large washer with holes style, torque the inner nut to 50 ft lbs while spinning the wheel to seat the bearings. Back off the inner locknut, then retorque to 35 ft lbs while spinning the wheel, then back off 90 degrees. Attempt to install the locking ring, and if the inner nut does not line up, tighten the inner nut until it does line up. DO NOT LOOSEN THE INNER NUT. Torque the outer locknut to 160-200 ft lbs.

The caliper is retained by pins that slip in between the caliper and hub, they have to be driven out using a punch. I have an old beat up monstrous screwdriver for this task. They look like this:

353733.jpg

CH beat me to the punch (pun intended).

Those things can be a royal pain in the ass. Be careful when you remove/reinstall them because you can break off those little tabs that hold it in place once seated. I highly recommend using something to pinch it together, like vice grips until it clears the edge of the caliper bracket.

Otherwise, it's not as hard as it looks.

Shoes OTOH can be quite daunting, definitely buy the tool to install the springs, I've done many brake drum jobs and the spring puller/installer pieces make the job so much easier. And as noted above, do one side at a time, so you can look at the complete side for guidance when putting it all back together again.

And anti-squeal is worth it's weight in gold, I buy the bottle of it at a time so I always have it on hand, I like the red stuff as it dries to a rubber cement consistency, however, it will get on things like clothing and never come off. Anti-squeal goes on the back side of the brake pads, not on the sliders.

Another tip for rears-if you have a digital camera and a printer, take a snapshot of them while they are still together, quick print it off, and when you go to reassemble them, you will have an example to compare against.

One thing to pay attention to is that those rubber slides go in a certain way, they can be installed wrong. The little lip/bump area goes towards the caliper bracket not towards the caliper itself.

In the front end, start by blocking the rear wheels, and jacking up the front end and supporting it with something sturdy (large, solid wooden blocks or jack stands).

Now, remove the front wheels. Remove the outer lockout half by taking out the allen head screws, and set that aside someplace it's not going to get dirty. The inner half of the lockout assy is retained by a lock ring that slips into a groove in the hub (the ring expands into this groove). A small dental type pick with a sharp point works best for removing these. The rest of the lockout will slide right out if you thread in one or two of the lockout retaining allen head bolts and give a tug.

The caliper is retained by pins that slip in between the caliper and hub, they have to be driven out using a punch. I have an old beat up monstrous screwdriver for this task. They look like this:

353733.jpg

You can see in the pic how it's kept in the groove by the little tabs, you have to tap on them at an angle to compress the rubbers to let the tab slip over the retainer lips.

Once you get them out, look at them closely for cracks or rot, if they show this, replace them-they're about $7 each from NAPA. http://www.napaonline.com/MasterPages/NOLMaster.aspx?PageId=470&LineCode=UP&PartNumber=82471&Description=Brake+Caliper+Housing+Bolt+-+Front

You're going to need 2 C Clamps for this......with the old inner pad still in the caliper, use a C-clamp to push the piston back, and leave the clamp on there for now, and repeat the process on the other side. You need to leave the clamp in there, or when you go to push the other side's piston's back in, all you will accomplish is to extend the pistons on the opposite side. (I hope that's clear?) Before you do this, pop the cap on the master cylinder and make sure that it's not going to overflow-if it does, brake fluid removes paint. I use an old turkey baster to suck out excess brake fluid. Support the calipers with an old hunk of coat hanger or bungee cord so they're not hanging on the hoses.

Now, slip the caliper off (you may need to use a little prybar action). Now, inspect the caliper piston boots for cracks, tears, etc. If they are damaged, it's time for new calipers-they're not as bad as you think, about $20 ea for this truck.

Take the time to use some sandpaper to remove any corrosion, growth, gunk, etc from the area where the caliper mounts to the spindle and the V grooves and pins-these need to "slip" in order for the caliper to "float" and not bind.

Remove the outer lockout half by taking out the allen head screws, and set that aside someplace it's not going to get dirty. The inner half of the lockout assy is retained by a lock ring that slips into a groove in the hub (the ring expands into this groove). A small dental type pick with a sharp point works best for removing these. The rest of the lockout will slide right out if you thread in one or two of the lockout retaining allen head bolts and give a tug.

You're going to need the axle nut tool to remove the retainer for the bearing nut. It's this one: http://broncograveyard.com/bronco/i-19625_froogle.htm Napa should have them on hand for $20 or less.

You're going to have to swap your hubs onto your new rotors-drive the old studs out of the hub, swap the rotor over, and pound the studs back into the new rotors, being careful not to damage the stud ends. I use a brass drift for this, the brass will deform or "give" before the steel will.

At this point, you really should remove the spindle and grease the bearings inside, but you are going to need a slide hammer and special adapter to pull them off. http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00971585000P?vName=Tools&cName=MechanicsTools&sName=Automotive%20Specialty%20Tools&psid=SHOPZILLA01&sid=IDx20070921x00003c

Clean and regrease the spindle bearings, and get a new set of seals-the aftermarket seals are nothing but a small rubber O-ring, the OEM Ford ones are much better.

Clean and repack the wheel bearings using a good quality grease rated for disc brake temps.

Before installing the slide pins, put a slathering coat of brake slide pin grease (silicone base, not petroleum stuff) on the slide surfaces and pins that you cleaned earlier. DO NOT USE PETROLEUM GREASE, it will cause the rubbers in the pins to swell up and not allow the brakes to "float". This is the stuff you want: http://www.permatex.com/products/Automotive/lubricants/specialty_lubricants/auto_Permatex_Ultra_Disc_Brake_Caliper_Lube_Hi-Temp_Silicone_Formula.htm It's less than $20/bottle, and will last you for years-use it on your bike brake pins also.

Reassemble in reverse, torque specs are:

Spindle to hub nuts: 35-40 ft lbs.

Lockout retainer bolts (little allen heads) 40-50 in lbs.

Inner wheel bearing nut: If it's the ratcheting style retainer spin tire, while tightening to 70 ft lbs to seat the bearings, then back off the nut 90 degrees. Retighten the nut to 20 ft lbs.

If it's the two nuts with a large washer with holes style, torque the inner nut to 50 ft lbs while spinning the wheel to seat the bearings. Back off the inner locknut, then retorque to 35 ft lbs while spinning the wheel, then back off 90 degrees. Attempt to install the locking ring, and if the inner nut does not line up, tighten the inner nut until it does line up. DO NOT LOOSEN THE INNER NUT. Torque the outer locknut to 160-200 ft lbs.

it really pisses me off that my gas wont do anything for you.

it really pisses me off that my gas wont do anything for you.

I know what ya mean! Thanks to everyone who posted, especially CH :p I appreciate it! I think I might enlist my girlfriends uncle to help me since he's a farmer and all he does is work on his pullin tractor all day. I think a can squeeze a few hours out of him.

Hmm... the one I did didn't matter, that was an 93 Explorer though. It did matter when I broke one of the tabs off, had to buy a new one after that.

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