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Fix your clutch drag

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First make sure you have proper free play in your cable. If you have to screw your adjustment all the way out then you need a new cable. Take your clutch cover off, remove bolts on pressure plate and take your clutch plates out. Rest your plates on a piece of glass if they're warped replace them. If everything so far is in check then you're ready to take the following steps. Others will tell you to shim out the pressure plate, this will cause the clutch to wear more quickly than normal. First take your bolts off the pressure plate. Find some small washers that fit on the bolt but also fit inside the clutch springs. This will shim the bolts out slightly and allow the springs more free play. Next move your clutch lever and find the point on the lever where it hits the handle grip. Take your clutch lever off and grind the backside of the lever where its hitting the handle grip. Depending on how much you grind off, this will allow the clutch to open up farther and release the plates that cause drag. This will save your clutch some life and also keep you from stalling.

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Awesome Post

Thanks! :doh:

This really helped me out. Before the bike would stall when I was stopped with the clutch pulled in (with a new clutch kit and cable). It was also really hard to find neutral while the bike was running. Now I can even kickstart my bike with the clutch pulled in and in gear.

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Shimming the bolts as you describe will decrease clamping force on the clutch and might cause slipping.

Also, I've not seen a clutch where travel was limited by the clutch assembly bottoming out. Seems it's always the linkage.

Your other suggestions will help.

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Shimming the bolts as you describe will decrease clamping force on the clutch and might cause slipping.

Also, I've not seen a clutch where travel was limited by the clutch assembly bottoming out. Seems it's always the linkage.

Your other suggestions will help.

A 1 mm shim on those bolts won't affect your clamping force that much and the lever does effect how far the clutch opens. Take the lever off and play with the cable once.

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I said the clutch assembly doesn't bottom out meaning the shim won't help.

I said it was always the linkage that limits travel. I include the lever as part of the linkage.

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I said the clutch assembly doesn't bottom out meaning the shim won't help.

I said it was always the linkage that limits travel. I include the lever as part of the linkage.

Ummm... The shim allows the clutch to open farther, keeping the springs from bottoming out when you shave your lever down. Put a spring in your hand and squeeze it until steel hits steel...thats called bottoming out. Its a pretty easy concept.

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Um, did you measure the spring to verify the coils bind or are you assuming?

I've never seen a clutch lever run out of travel indicating the clutch springs bound.

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Um, did you measure the spring to verify the coils bind or are you assuming?

I've never seen a clutch lever run out of travel indicating the clutch springs bound.

Im trying to help people out here... If you have a different method please enlighten us. Im not going to sit here and argue with you about something so simple. :doh:

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First make sure you have proper free play in your cable. If you have to screw your adjustment all the way out then you need a new cable. Take your clutch cover off, remove bolts on pressure plate and take your clutch plates out. Rest your plates on a piece of glass if they're warped replace them. If everything so far is in check then you're ready to take the following steps. Others will tell you to shim out the pressure plate, this will cause the clutch to wear more quickly than normal. First take your bolts off the pressure plate. Find some small washers that fit on the bolt but also fit inside the clutch springs. This will shim the bolts out slightly and allow the springs more free play. Next move your clutch lever and find the point on the lever where it hits the handle grip. Take your clutch lever off and grind the backside of the lever where its hitting the handle grip. Depending on how much you grind off, this will allow the clutch to open up farther and release the plates that cause drag. This will save your clutch some life and also keep you from stalling.

i tried doing this but my clutch wont let me adjust its cable :snore: so i couldnt get past the free play step. o wait i have a husky no drag :doh:

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Im trying to help people out here... If you have a different method please enlighten us. Im not going to sit here and argue with you about something so simple. :doh:

He is not arguing with you and he is a respected member of TT. The worst thing that anyone could do on this site is sit back and assume the poster knows what they are talking about. Playing devils advocate and challenging ideas and theorys are how the truly ingenious and inventive ideas are born...It's not arguing, its purely a discussion. It'll be arguing when people start getting rude....

It's not hard, all he is saying is that you are correct that grinding down the back of the lever will increase the amount that the pressure plate opens, but grinding it down will normally not allow it to open up so much that you encounter coil bind. Therefore the shims on the bolts are not entirely nessecary because they were installed to fix a problem that most likely was never happening in the first place.

Now, if you were expierencing the assembly completely bottoming out before the ground down lever completely contacted the bar/grip, then your shims are nessecary and I am wrong...:snore:

Good tips otherwise, but wouldnt grinding down the lever weaken it causing it to bend easily? Just throwing it out there...

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Good tips otherwise, but wouldnt grinding down the lever weaken it causing it to bend easily? Just throwing it out there...

What exactly are the good tips? You said the shims serve no purpose and the lever's going to bend... lol Of course shaving the lever would slightly weaken it. But Ive dumped the bike on the lever a couple of times now and it seems to be fine. If I was that worried about the structural integrity of my lever I probably would never take my bike out of the garage.

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First make sure you have proper free play in your cable.

If you have to screw your adjustment all the way out then you need a new cable.

Take your clutch cover off, remove bolts on pressure plate and take your clutch plates out. Rest your plates on a piece of glass if they're warped replace them.

You don't remember your own post? To answer your question, I think these are good tips. (above)

As far as the lever grinding goes...I think its an interesting idea but I'm a little more concerned about finishing the moto than I am about clutch drag...you asked...

Hey man, if it works for you, don't mind me...

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Those two tips won't fix your drag, its just common practice. Shimming and shaving the lever is what's fixing the drag. Its just not worth doing that if your plates are warped or the cable is stretched. My bike had tons of drag with a new clutch and cable. Its always had alittle, thats why I tried this method because I was sick of it.

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First take your bolts off the pressure plate. Find some small washers that fit on the bolt but also fit inside the clutch springs. This will shim the bolts out slightly and allow the springs more free play.

Well it doesnt allow more free play for the springs, what it does is not sinch them down as tight as without a washer inside the bolt, this just doesnt put as much force on the outter plate. Your talking like 1mm less that the bolt doesnt compress the clutch springs in and very little difference in clamping force on the pressure plate.

NOW i can back him on the adding washers under clutch spring bolts, i thought of this myself many years ago, about 10 to be exact, just thought it up and did it too my bike (yz250) i have 3 YZ250s and one KX250 with this mod done and all bikes were raced MX with, i never once had a clutch even so much as slip! I did this to a buddies bike also, i figure the clutch pull was lessened by around 15%, which at the time i liked the fact of having easier clutch pull, for racing anything easier is nice LOL

SO for me it has proven itself to be a mod that actally works, NOW if your clutch is about to go already then thats a different story, but I had this done to several bikes for several years under racing stress on the clutch and not one problem. Some higher HP engines.......not sure, but i wouldnt hesitate to try it on my XR650R myself!

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when the bike is fully warmed up my clutch fully disengages about 1/4 of pull on the clutch lever. is that normal? id like it to be 1/2 and it starts to slip and 3/4 fully disengaged. 1/4 of pull isn't enough for me to really feather the clutch its either engaged or disengaged.

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Every bikes alittle different but that sounds like your cable may be alittle tight, causing the clutch to disengage before it should. There should be a couple of mm's of play in the lever, it shouldnt be seated tightly.

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