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Harnass Question

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The race season starts this Sunday and I'm going to get the bike ready for "hard" riding one night this week. For those of you that have been through their harnass, did you take it off completely in order to inspect it or did you just finger through the bundles? I was thinking about doing some "drastic" changes to the harnass, but I don't know if it is a good idea or not. By drastic I mean, totally removing the oxygen sensor wires, removing the large connector near the head (not the D&M plug-in, the BIG one that sits to the left of the spark plug). I don't know what harm can be done by removing this unused connectors, I just want to know if anyone has done it already before I make the "big clip"

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Leave it on the bike and double insulate the breakouts. Getting rid of the O2 sensor wires is a good idea though. I may make some changes to the relay circuit, add suppression, '03 switch, and a solid state relay to drive the fuel pump for better ECU protection.

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GP,

I think you're the king of the cool mods ... but you need to document your (ie: understandable instructions/parts (and where you can obtain them)) mods.

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I'm in exactly the same boat as Jason. Our season starts in 3 weeks and I want the Clatterdale to be bullet proof.

I've gotten as far as cutting the zip ties loose... then I lost my nerve. :D I've been 'studying it' ever sense. I'd also like to remove the clutter from the top of the head, and move the ECU plug in unit to the rear at the seat & rear fender. It appears that I could move all of it back to around the battery box area, maybe even by what appears to be a relay or solinoid of some nature beside the battery.

In order to do this though I'd have to split open the wire loom that the majority of those wires are grouped into. I wouldn't want to do that unless I could replace it though.

Glenn, you've mentioned that you found several potential problems when you went through your harness. Did you open up the looms and look over each individual wire, or just gave it a once over in its stock form?

This surely can't be as hard or scary as it looks...can it? :)

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Look closely at the harness where "breakouts" of a smaller number of wires go to connectors. You will find these are unprotected, and frequently in contact with or close to the frame or frame fasteners. These are the wires you need to add insulation to. Also look for shiny spots on the frame, valve cover, etc. that indicate rubbing. Use zip ties/insulation/minor repositioning to eliminate this.

Potential trouble spots are:

unused O2 sensor breakout(heat)

upper subframe bolt area (insulate nut)

valve cover area (heat, abrasion)

stator connector (sharp bend, wires touch frame)

rectifier/regulator (sharp bend, tension)

throttle body upper right side (abrasion on throttle body)

fuel pump (tie connector to frame, eliminate flex, insulate wires)

relay, fuse area (many sharp bends)

The main loom is fine, its tightly wraped, insulated, and mounted to the subframe which is cool on the right side.

You can cut the sleeving and pull the interface wires back far enough to locate the D&M connector near the relay, just tape it up tightly and mount it back up. I did it with extended wires, leaving the harness intact.

Keep in mind whenever you have a wire with sharp bend in conjunction with vibration and movement, you are asking for a broken wire.

Overall try to eliminate stress, movement, heat exposure, and abrasion and the system will be 100% better.

I'm working on some other neat stuff using solid state relays. If space allows I will replace the existing one and add additional one to drive the fuel pump. Also re-plumbing the fuel system to allow a little more room for a bigger fan.

Hope this helps.

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