Jumps

Im having trouble with my jumps. well not only my jumps. but that is what im talking about for now. I'm having trouble getting the balls to do high speed jumps my fear is that i will go over the bars or off the back I do small jumps 30' but the long table tops im landing on top of them. most times I get good jumps but say one out of ten i will have the front come up high and land hard on my back tire. then im scared to go big. im a whussie!:worthy:

practice keeping your body neutral on takeoff

Hey DavieB where do you ride at?

Just continue to practice at it - if it were that easy, everyone would be doing it. Don't give up, but don't get yourself killed either. :worthy:

practice keeping your body neutral on takeoff

This sums it up, stay loose and let your body come up with the bike.

I ordered Gary Semics' DVD on jumps and whoops.

I ride at 89 raceway in Mayflower and some at Russellville this is AR.

yep i've been there. i was scared of going over the bars so i kept my weight too far back on the bike and ended up landing front wheel high on every jump. just find a small easy jump and keep your weight farther forward. the steeper the jump the more important it is to stay forward.

lets try to meet up in Mayflower sometime. I will help as much as I can.

This question, as with just about every question posted in this forum is very complex. 125shifter said it first, I will reiterate and add to it. Seat time is EXTREMELY important. You have to know your bike and the only way you really know it is to ride it - alot. That said, body position really depends on many factors - takeoff angle, amount of throttle applied during takeoff, angle of landing, ruts in the face, kickers in the face, etc. So, ride your bike, and keep hitting jumps. You are doing the right thing by starting on tables as the risk/reward is very low/high. Keep working at it, but do it smartly. We have all crashed, some of us worse than others. Accept that sometimes you will fail, learn from the mistakes you make, and move forward.

You have to know your bike and the only way you really know it is to ride it - alot.

An understatement!!!! I'm so in tune w/ my bike at this point, it's not funny.

im scared too, jumping stuff , but little by little you gotta build that confidence level, , for example jumping bmx jumps , my confidence in jumping is very high on bmx jumps , jumping huge stuff but on mx its not that high which im building on ,

An understatement!!!! I'm so in tune w/ my bike at this point, it's not funny.

I have become much more in tune with my bike as well. I laugh to myself sometimes on the track because I find myself moving all over it to gain traction where ever I may be on the track. But I know (most of the time) how my bike is going to react. I know when I enter a corner, how hard I can get on the brakes without going down, and when and how hard I can get on the gas. I have found that I am getting on the gas much sooner, and trying to roll it on instead of pinning it, and it is working. Don't get me wrong, I will pin it, but not when I am in a flat/slick corner, where before I probably would and then went down. I am developing a style of my own, and I am learning every time I get on the bike. I follow faster guys and try to see where they get on the gas and the brakes, and it is so much fun now. I actually can use their lines now, and, more importantly, see why they go where they go, and make use of it. One thing I have noticed is the faster guys all enter corners really wide, sweep way to the inside, and get on the gas almost entering the corner. I have been trying this and I am having success with it. I remember reading somewhere that often times the difference between ability levels is line selection and using them properly. Watch the B session at a pro national. Now those are your local expert guys (for the most part), who would probably smoke most anyone at their local track. Watch the lines they put in and use during their practice session. Then watch the A session, which are all the top guys, and you will see a big difference there as well. The faster you go, the more you have to alter your lines, and you see the track in a different way. That is why I love this sport. It is so hard and there are so many steps to get to the top (someplace I will never see). Most people just don't understand, they think you just sit on a bike and it does all the work. If they only knew.......:worthy:

That is why I love this sport. It is so hard and there are so many steps to get to the top (someplace I will never see). Most people just don't understand, they think you just sit on a bike and it does all the work. If they only knew.......:lol:

I've said this before... I've done a lot of different sports, but NONE OF THEM combine so many or require so many facets of skill and endurance to be good. I'm further from the top than you and now that I've found some keys, I'm like an old shark that smells blood; I'm hungry and I'm swimming my ass off to catch up!!!

I'm just a professional practice moto rider, but there's always an opportunity to play pick-up moto w/ someone @ the track and that's just fine w/ me. :worthy:

Hell, I'll pass a rider going in the opposite direction and if he's got similar skills, I'll meter on subsequent passes how much ground I've lost or made up and he may never know I'm "racing" (probably does though). He might be 20 seconds back or so, but it's still a challenge and a motivator.

I've said this before... I've done a lot of different sports, but NONE OF THEM combine so many or require so many facets of skill and endurance to be good. I'm further from the top than you and now that I've found some keys, I'm like an old shark that smells blood; I'm hungry and I'm swimming my ass off to catch up!!!

I'm just a professional practice moto rider, but there's always an opportunity to play pick-up moto w/ someone @ the track and that's just fine w/ me. :worthy:

Hell, I'll pass a rider going in the opposite direction and if he's got similar skills, I'll meter on subsequent passes how much ground I've lost or made up and he may never know I'm "racing" (probably does though). He might be 20 seconds back or so, but it's still a challenge and a motivator.

I agree on all accounts. I have played every stick and ball sport there is at including semi pro baseball, so I am fully aware of what it takes to compete. This sport is by far the most challenging and requires the most combination of skills and endurance as you said. As for "racing" people, I do what you do all the time. The only time someone might know is if I happen to see someone who is in my class out on the track. I will let them go by, and then pull out and see if I can catch them and or pass them. That gives me a good idea of where I stand as far as my riding goes. I will hopefully perform well this weekend at my first race of the season and really see where I stack up. If I have no problems, I should be right up front, but that is a really big if.

as hard/stupid as this sounds, just work on doing the jumps and when your bike is nose down........panic rev.

and when you nose is high (AKA, boner error) tap the brakes and pull in the clutch.

i did that when i started because it gave me confedence when i went off a jump kinda pointing in a up or down direction.

you just need to practice that. that is only one of the billion ways to practice building confedince.

I've said this before... I've done a lot of different sports, but NONE OF THEM combine so many or require so many facets of skill and endurance to be good. I'm further from the top than you and now that I've found some keys, I'm like an old shark that smells blood; I'm hungry and I'm swimming my ass off to catch up!!!

I'm just a professional practice moto rider, but there's always an opportunity to play pick-up moto w/ someone @ the track and that's just fine w/ me. :worthy:

Hell, I'll pass a rider going in the opposite direction and if he's got similar skills, I'll meter on subsequent passes how much ground I've lost or made up and he may never know I'm "racing" (probably does though). He might be 20 seconds back or so, but it's still a challenge and a motivator.

So true shifter, Ive had my 07 crf 450r since june last year, so from being at first so SH*T scared of it at first and crashing many many times :lol: (my mates keep paying me out) and then loosing 16kg (nothing like too tight fitting body armour) to make you loose weight.

I am at a point where the bike does not scare me any more, and I have the confidence to just ride it and not worry about what will happen, and try to keep the basics in my mind, body position etc.

I also spent money on the suspension (took it to a local tuner) race tech gold valves and he set it up for me and my weight. Trust me it made a HUGE DIFFERENCE as the bike handles sooo much better which = confidence :lol:

I try to ride every weekend and although I still cant keep up with my wide open mates, I can at least keep them in visual now and Im slowly getting faster !

Also Im starting to pass others on the track, riding mx is like learning another language, you learn the letters then it just all starts making sense and you are away !!!

I still have a long way to go, but Im proud of the fact I ride a 450 and my speed is increasing !!!

Seat time and just riding your bike is crucial also go do a MX school, compared to the cost of the bike and gear its a cheap investment. Im booked into doing the moss school in october (Jake moss Dad runs it) and cant wait to learn more.

Go out and have a blast with your mates :lol: stay safe and ride at your own pace but try to push the bike a little each time and youll learn what you can get away with.

yea it is hard on a not so young guy. I wrecked sunday my palm and lower arm are black and blue my knee is also but i think we are going back today.

As anther noob, I say that's a helpful link right there. Thanks!

WARNING; My opinion; as a noob, it seems we noobs, I, need to think more 'forward' when we hear 'neutral'. I can see where experiences riders think 'neutral' when they hear 'neutral' because, well, it is!

Even when I think I am a bit forward, my buddies still say "Too far back" and the rear is hitting the ground first. I am trying to get used to my head, as in the vid, being pretty much in line with the forks if they were extended up through the bar. That seems to be a real good visual for my body position.

Does that sound about right? Body IS neutral but the head is pretty far forward? You freaking experienced guys make this look so effortless and just beautiful! :worthy:

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