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Trials Tires?

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What does everyone think? Run them? What type, tubeless, pressure, brand?

How about performance, terrain, mud, roots, up hill, down hill, corners. What about racing them in Hare scrambles I know alot guys swear by them for Enduros. How about riding ability increase it, help you get to the next level.

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I run a trials rear on my KTM 200 and it's like cheating in anything that's rooted, rocky, or slippery. Where a knobby will kick and spin, the trials tire hooks up and doesn't miss a step. They don't do so well in deep mud or snow and you have to keep an eye on the pressure.

The only hare scramble I used the trials tire at was the Frostbite. All the other HS I've swapped over to a knobby.

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I,ve heard people say its like cheatting. They've also said it will help you get raise your riding ability.

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I don't know if they will raise your riding ability but they will let you go places you couldn't go before. My example is a wind fall in deep woods that fell downhill leaving a big root ball. We were blazing new trail and wanted to go up hill and left turn around the top of the root ball. I had a knobby and it took me two attempts in the loaming soil with lots of wheel spin, my partner was on a Trials bike w/ a Michelin X11 radial tubeless Trials tire and he just rode up and around. Next day I went out and bought Dunlop 803 radial tubeless Trials tire and installed it using the Nuetech tubliss system. Next time we went out I intentially took a more up hill route around a tree higher up the hill and cleaned it. yahoo!!!!

However it doesn't work as good in deep wet mud, small loss for the increased traction everywhere else. I'm going to put a Michelin X11 on my other bike. Another benfit is rear braking on steep downhills is enough better to justify the switch to a Trials tire.

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What does everyone think? Run them? What type, tubeless, pressure, brand?

How about performance, terrain, mud, roots, up hill, down hill, corners. What about racing them in Hare scrambles I know alot guys swear by them for Enduros. How about riding ability increase it, help you get to the next level.

I just put a Michelin X-11 on my 450 last week,tube type running 10 psi. WOW.......should have put one on along time ago! Its going change my riding style.....no more white knukle hill climbs wondering if the rear tire will give me needed traction. It hooks up and away you go. We rode Naches Thus-Sat and I was very impressed. I rode everything from nasty mud,hill sides with single track cut into them,dualsport @ 60 mph,tough "for me before" uphill rocky sections ect. On the trail its 200% better,rear braking alone is not as good but fine when used normaly with front and rear brakes together. Its only down side would be on the road at 60,i'm sure the 10 psi was not helping. Its not a tire I felt like leaning into a corner real hard on the road. Its off road abilty far out weighs the on road short comings. Its not a DOT tire,I had seen a post online stating the x-11 is DOT approved but its clearly marked as a non-DOT tire on the sidewall. As for the next level.....with out a question in one weekend,its a whole new ride. :worthy:

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Im going to order a Dunlop 803 this week and give it a try. I figure nothin to lose really.

I have the 803 and won't look back except the D100. I run a Maxxis Desert IT there. I did the Hareport scrambles last fall and hucked the bike through the course and the trails tire still looked brand new when I finished.

Stop sitting on the sidelines while we're out here cheating at the same game...

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The more I here the better it sounds. I cant wait to try it, hopefully fri or sat.

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What can I say?

After 35 years of running them, I wouldn't have anything else... But then, I'm running something even better.... A Trials Bike attached to my Trials Tire!! :lol: Oh yes, and the training and skills that go with both. :worthy:

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chuck4788 has the right idea: Tubeless!! No pinch flats, no torn valve stems (not sure about the tubliss system) and no rim locks. And, you can then run as low as 2 PSI like we do when needed... Just carry a pump and air up or down as needed.

But the super low pressures are only good on the Radial Ply versions. Some newer compromise "Trials Tires" are bias ply and will flop side to side at the very low end of the PSI scale.

But don't ask me how they work in racing or Hare Scrambles... I can go fast if I want, but I'm NOT a racer.

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I put a trials tire on my 525 and have close to 600 miles on the tire and has barely shown any wear. I've mostly ridden trails with this tire but also used it for the 12hr race at starvation ridge and it did great. You won't regret getting one.

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Why is it that every time I see that video Joe gave the link to, I wanna ride on a golf course? :worthy::lol::lol:

Are you guys absolutely certain about the trials tires being better on downhills? I've been running a TUbliss/MT43 Pirelli combo since March, and the downhill situations with the trials tires are enough to make my buttocks pucker up, leaving little "pucker-pyramids" in my upholstery..... Assuming I was sitting down, of course........

Jimmie

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Why is it that every time I see that video Joe gave the link to, I wanna ride on a golf course? :lol: :lol: :lol:

Are you guys absolutely certain about the trials tires being better on downhills? I've been running a TUbliss/MT43 Pirelli combo since March, and the downhill situations with the trials tires are enough to make my buttocks pucker up, leaving little "pucker-pyramids" in my upholstery..... Assuming I was sitting down, of course........

Jimmie

The higher the pressure you run in them, the less traction they will have. And in your downhill runs, have someone video you and see if your knees are back behind the foot pegs and NOT directly above or perpendicular to them.

If you will adjust your weight so that there is no pressure in your hands on the bars and you are not clamped to the bike with your boots or legs, then your weight will affect the bike at the pegs or even behind the pegs a little. This will add a significant amount of weight and grip to the rear tire.

But take photos or videos from the side. You would be surprised at how many riders swear up and down they are using the correct stance... until they see a side photo of themselves. :worthy:

Maybe someone has some example photos of a rider in a steep downhill section. Maybe one with the correct position and one with the knees forward or in the same place as when on flat ground. I see it alot, but my library has mostly Trials Photos.

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I run between 6.5 to 8 lbs. pressure in the MT43. Too much?

I dunno about anyone videoing myself going down a hill..... Why would I want people to watch a clip of a 53 yr. old squid screaming like a little schoolgirl? :worthy:

Jimmie

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A trials tire will flat out hook up AND they don't tear up the trail at the same time.

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My comments about downhill braking was on a long hill with curves that I have ridden many times with a knobby. It is two track with loose rocks and steep enough that I need to use heavy front braking to control speed. First trip down with the Dunlop 803 trials tire and I had enough extra rear wheel traction that I think I could do the descent wo front brake. The rear traction really improved directional control enough that I think I could increase my speed. Climbing the hill with the Trials was just a non-event compared to the knobby, the bike just stayed hookup and went straight. The knobby was a Dunlop 756 with the knobs just showing rounding. I've also ridden this hill on a Trials bike with a Michelin X11 tubeless and thought the extra traction and control was because I could get my weight over the rear wheel, wrong.

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Are you guys absolutely certain about the trials tires being better on downhills?

IMHO the braking power is less with the trials tire. not a lot but enough to notice. They also do not work well on slick clay. Passed buddy Jake going backwards on an uphill as me and 4 other guys motored by him. In roots and rocks the trails tire cannot be beat. I view it as a trade off. I have 2 sets of wheels, one with knobs and one with trials tire. I run the trials in the dry and knob in the wet / loam. I like knobs when laid over and on the gas better than the trails tire. Take a little different technique and ride style for the trails tire. I also noticed I need more rebound damping in the rear when running a trails tire and feel the rear end does not work as good in the whoops.

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They also do not work well on slick clay. Passed buddy Jake going backwards on an uphill as me and 4 other guys motored by him.

My experience on hard, greasy slick clay is that the trials tire has to be at low pressure to get good traction (5 - 6 psi). On greasy clay a well worn Mitas trials tire at 6 psi would outclimb a fairly new Pirelli MT-16 knobby at 6 and 8 psi. Both were on a GasGas 300's.

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I ran a Dunlop trials tire on my KTM200 for the first time on the Devils Head ISDE here in OR last year. It was generally a dry ride and the tire hooked up great on everything, climbing hills infested with roots and rocks was much easier, you just knew you were going to make it. The only negative thing I noticed was going down hills like others have said, you tend to slide down faster, not a lot but it is noticeable. One benefit in those conditions is it slides straight, it doesn't deflect from side to side like a knobby will do which I really liked. Trail riding with it, even in the wet is great, the only condition I find it not as good (actually better) than a knobby is ice/snow. You do have to make sure you run a heavy duty tube to guard against flats and low pressure or it won't work as well.

DK

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