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riding a 2stroke

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i have a kx85 and i just dont ride it like a true two stroke, everywhere i ride people tell me to pinn it more and that the rpms are to low but i always feel like the bike's gonna explode. im stepping up to a 125 because the 85 is way to small, but dont know if i should just switch to a 4stroke because of my riding. Although I dont think i can get one in my price range that i can start racing on ($1500). anyway, any tips on how to REALY ride a 2stroke so i can ride my new bike for real

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2strokes are really durable as far as revving goes, the piston always has compression above it so it always comes back.

If you want to get the most out of it, you need to keep the throttle on almost all the time, and use the clutch to dole out power to the wheel. It feels abusive, but isn't that bad as long as you change the tranny oil fairly often, and are comfortable changing clutch plates (it's easy :worthy:).

this is especially true on small pingers - 125 and under. On my 250 and 465 I use the clutch a little less by just staying in a low gear and keeping it on the pipe that way, but I'm still not as fast as guys that are artists with the clutch.

If you naturally rev it less you can do things like v-force reeds, and maybe a gnarly pipe, play with the exhaust valve, or even look at porting to get some more bottom out of it. 2strokes tend to be pipey, but you can move the powerband around to fit your liking :banana:

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+1 to SOAB_465...

About the 2t vs 4t, you are at a critical learning point in your riding, and the 125 is a VITAL stepping stone. If you skip the 125s, your riding could and probably will suffer in the long run. The guys who really smoke on 250f's paid their dues on 125s. Don't skip the 125!!

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I would have been lost without my 125 as a stepping stone! 4 strokes were old and ugly looking when I started riding, and didnt so much as roll onto a motocross track like they have sodominantly done these days-

Ahh the RM 125, what a fun bike!

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I skipped the 125, but then again, I've been riding since I was three lol.

If I could go back and do it again, I most likely would have rode 125s

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i have a kx85 and i just dont ride it like a true two stroke, everywhere i ride people tell me to pinn it more and that the rpms are to low but i always feel like the bike's gonna explode. im stepping up to a 125 because the 85 is way to small, but dont know if i should just switch to a 4stroke because of my riding. Although I dont think i can get one in my price range that i can start racing on ($1500). anyway, any tips on how to REALY ride a 2stroke so i can ride my new bike for real

Watch all these vids and you get the idea how you ride 125's :worthy:

http://www.facebook.com/v/1075739890746

http://www.facebook.com/v/1075742050800

http://video.mpora.com/watch/QgOFMERYH/

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Dude just open the throttle and **** it...whatever happens happens...rip it up out their..**** it....**** it all.. yaaahhhooooooooo!!quit being a punjabee

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2strokes are really durable as far as revving goes, the piston always has compression above it so it always comes back.

If you want to get the most out of it, you need to keep the throttle on almost all the time, and use the clutch to dole out power to the wheel. It feels abusive, but isn't that bad as long as you change the tranny oil fairly often, and are comfortable changing clutch plates (it's easy :worthy:).

this is especially true on small pingers - 125 and under. On my 250 and 465 I use the clutch a little less by just staying in a low gear and keeping it on the pipe that way, but I'm still not as fast as guys that are artists with the clutch.

If you naturally rev it less you can do things like v-force reeds, and maybe a gnarly pipe, play with the exhaust valve, or even look at porting to get some more bottom out of it. 2strokes tend to be pipey, but you can move the powerband around to fit your liking :banana:

+1 to SOAB_465...

About the 2t vs 4t, you are at a critical learning point in your riding, and the 125 is a VITAL stepping stone. If you skip the 125s, your riding could and probably will suffer in the long run. The guys who really smoke on 250f's paid their dues on 125s. Don't skip the 125!!

Great posts. I'm very seriously considering getting a 125 now. I have a 250f and a 250 2st but I got into the sport late at 25, now I'm 27, totally hooked and I'm starting to question my technique, the kx 250 is scary, my rmz 250 is nice to ride and I'm always improving on it but I know I'm missing the fundamental key skills needed to get better and faster. I think being on a 125 might force me to learn some proper clutch control and fluidity. I rely way too much on that friendly torque band the 4st provides. I'm at a point now where the speeds are high enough and jumps dangerous enough to get really hurt so I fill my pants when the bike gets out of shape in the air. I need to safely learn some corrective bike control, like whips/leans and brake tapping. The other day I went through a right-left chicane bomb hole that then shoots you stright up into the air and into a flat right hand corner. As I went airborne my bike was still reacting to me pushing the pegs to the right as I was turning the left hander, the rear end whipped out and I just panicked, did nothing and accepted that I had 3 second's use of my legs remaining in my life because when I reach the ground and explode I will likely wake up rolling around in a mixture of bike and leg fragments....... I was pleasantly suprised to land throttle on and get away with it! I think I need to step back and work on technique. Not sure if my 170lb 5'11" frame would be too much for a 125 though? Or even that I need to change bike to make the learning easier, a 125 is lighter and easier to control is my thinking. What do you guys think?

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Great posts. I'm very seriously considering getting a 125 now. I have a 250f and a 250 2st but I got into the sport late at 25, now I'm 27, totally hooked and I'm starting to question my technique, the kx 250 is scary, my rmz 250 is nice to ride and I'm always improving on it but I know I'm missing the fundamental key skills needed to get better and faster. I think being on a 125 might force me to learn some proper clutch control and fluidity. I rely way too much on that friendly torque band the 4st provides. I'm at a point now where the speeds are high enough and jumps dangerous enough to get really hurt so I fill my pants when the bike gets out of shape in the air. I need to safely learn some corrective bike control, like whips/leans and brake tapping. The other day I went through a right-left chicane bomb hole that then shoots you stright up into the air and into a flat right hand corner. As I went airborne my bike was still reacting to me pushing the pegs to the right as I was turning the left hander, the rear end whipped out and I just panicked, did nothing and accepted that I had 3 second's use of my legs remaining in my life because when I reach the ground and explode I will likely wake up rolling around in a mixture of bike and leg fragments....... I was pleasantly suprised to land throttle on and get away with it! I think I need to step back and work on technique. Not sure if my 170lb 5'11" frame would be too much for a 125 though? Or even that I need to change bike to make the learning easier, a 125 is lighter and easier to control is my thinking. What do you guys think?

Yes, buying a 125 would be a great move. And it is possible for you to rip on a 125, even at 170lb. I weigh 175lb and can still scoot on our KX 85, so a 125 would definitely work for you if you had the suspension setup. It will definitely need stiffer springs, as 125s are usually set up for little rubber people who don't shave yet.

Or if you don't want to buy a new bike, you could always just detune your 250 (heavier flywheel, down 1 or 2 teeth on the rear sprocket) until you feel comfortable with the power delivery, then slowly take it back to stock as your riding progresses. Either way, practice as much as you can on a 2 stroke! It can only make you faster. :worthy:

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thanks guys looks like im definetly gonna buy a 125, great advice

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In my opinion a 125 can make the difference between a Good Rider and a Great Rider. If you can ride a 125 really good and fast you will be able to ride anything fast. 125s teach you stuff that no other bikes will. I keep my 125 around and ride it every once in awhile to keep me on my toes.

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I'm 210 and my 125 is just fine. (It's a 144 but...same thing :worthy: )

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i dont mean 2 highjack this thread but i went from 85s 2 a 250f and now i just picked up a rm250, i can ring both bikes out, do u think im missing out because i didnt ride 125s?

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i have a kx85 and i just dont ride it like a true two stroke, everywhere i ride people tell me to pinn it more and that the rpms are to low but i always feel like the bike's gonna explode. im stepping up to a 125 because the 85 is way to small, but dont know if i should just switch to a 4stroke because of my riding. Although I dont think i can get one in my price range that i can start racing on ($1500). anyway, any tips on how to REALY ride a 2stroke so i can ride my new bike for real

You can see free MX Technique DVDs on my website. In the earlier DVDs there are a lot of 2 strokes. You can hear and see how they are suppose to be riden. Smaller 2 strokes do have to rev a lot to make power.

www.gsmxs.com :worthy:

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