Scotts SUB mount

Could someone tell if 09 YZ250F needs the same updates SUB mount kit as 08-09 YZ450F?

Thanks

I finally received my used stabilizer unit. I was told it to be the off-road version meaning it dampens only from center out. It`s hard to tell by hand, but there seems to be some difference when I turn the slow speed nut to fairly hard. I was trying to confirm that by using the part#, but couldn`t find any part#-s from scotts site to compare it to.

Also, it came with the stepped link arm, there seems to be also a straight version. So my question is for what mounting ways is the stepped arm ment and for which is the straight arm?

I am now trying to find a used SUB mount set up for my 08 YZ450F, so if I need a different link arm then I better order it from scotts. And when it came to that, anyone is welcome to offer me their used mounting kit (PM).

By the way, I have asked all these questions from Scotts, but usually it takes them about a week to answer.

Oh, and when I am typing allready, I better ask about servicing the unit.

I am reading the Scotts service manual and all seems rather straight forward, but the fifth step is bugging me. It might be my poor english or lack of imagination, but could some one explain it to me a bit better?

"Remove both bleed hole bolts (bottom of damper diagram # 3). Move the vane all the way to one hole, fill the

damper by injecting oil into the opposite hole forcing air out the other hole at the same time. (diagram # 4).

Scotts offers a tapered tip damper oil bottle for injecting oil, making this operation easier."

"Remove both bleed hole bolts (bottom of damper diagram # 3). Move the vane all the way to one hole, fill the

damper by injecting oil into the opposite hole forcing air out the other hole at the same time. (diagram # 4).

Scotts offers a tapered tip damper oil bottle for injecting oil, making this operation easier."

Swinging the arm all the way one direction or other allows fluid to flow across the entire width of the unit. Hold the damper at a slight slant with one of the bleed holes at the low point, and the other high. Push oil in through the lower hole until it comes out the upper one.

What works very well for this is any plastic injection syringe with either a bulb or a plunger in it that has a nose small enough to fit the bleed holes. A very small funnel can work, too.

I worked a little variation on this: I picked up two small meat "basting" syringes, made for injecting seasonings under turkey skins while roasting. I removed the plungers and inserted one in each of the two bleed/fill holes. I filled each with oil, then began to slowly move the link arm back and forth. One side would blow bubbles while the other pulled fluid in as I went one way, then as I swung back, this would reverse. Air was pumped out as fluid was drawn in. Exceptionally simple.

Scotts cautions you to leave a little air in the unit to allow for thermal expansion, so once it was totally filled, before replacing the screws, I moved the lever one way just enough to push 2-3 drops out of one side, then plugged it up and installed it. :busted:

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