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correct way to pick up a heavy bike without painners

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do squats and deadlifts in the gym with free weights and you'll be flipping the bike up like it was half its weight in no time(really, and it's not like you have to be liftin ghuge weight either, proper form is super important). Otherwise, it's basic deadlift form to pick it up, a tugger strap will help on the back of the seat.

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The Z is heavy....the time I notice the weight is when I'm haning off balance or hung up on a log, etc. When I need to lift the back end I find that lifting by the rear fender is best...I do have a Tugger and I don't find lifting any easier with it....but it does give you a nice handle in which to drag the bike up and over the obstacle your hung up on.

I've fitted a front Tugger which has paid for itself more than once.......

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It's a strap usually mounted between the rear fender or rear seat bolts that you can grab to move the rear end of the bike around in a pickle. It prevents you from having to grab the rear fender and potentially breaking it. They make them for the front forks as well which a lot of riders use in hard or extrem enduros to attach a tow strap too in order to aid getting up the hairy stuff.

Just watch some clips of erzberg. You'll see lots of mortals getting assistance with tugger straps all over their bikes.

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Er.. turn the wheel towards you standing at the side of the bike, grab the inside bar and lift it up, never had a problem lifting any bike this way. So easy.

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Thanks! I ordered one for my front and rear. Hopefully to assist with picking the bike up!

It's a strap usually mounted between the rear fender or rear seat bolts that you can grab to move the rear end of the bike around in a pickle. It prevents you from having to grab the rear fender and potentially breaking it. They make them for the front forks as well which a lot of riders use in hard or extrem enduros to attach a tow strap too in order to aid getting up the hairy stuff.

Just watch some clips of erzberg. You'll see lots of mortals getting assistance with tugger straps all over their bikes.

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Er.. turn the wheel towards you standing at the side of the bike, grab the inside bar and lift it up, never had a problem lifting any bike this way. So easy.

+1. Works on a 500lb BMW GS. I'm no body-builder and have used this technique more times than I care to admit.

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By the handlebars.

I always grab them normally and lift, it may give your back a twist but haven't had a problem. The reason for grabbing them normally is so you can pull the clutch to keep the engine running and use the front brake to stop the bike rolling if the ground isn't level. I've tried the locking the front wheel over once as some of the ride schools teach and found the front wants to roll away and you can't control it with both hands cupped under one grip.

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If its on the ground, pick it like a big street bike. Face away from the bike. Butt to the seat, hand on the downside bar and rear fender. Squat and lift with the the legs. Your rearward momentum when lifting will help pick it up.

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There was a single reply in here with the word "gym". Not knowing how old everyone in here is, I cannot emphasize enough that you learn to lift things correctly. I lift my V-Strom (with panniers) with my butt against the seat, because I can get under it, but I lift my DR-Z 400 like an Olympic dead lift.

Look up dead lifts on youtube. They do not look like the vertical back, "lift with your legs" posters that you see in moving vans. The right posture is toes tucked under the bike and shins vertical, flexed at the hips like a pair of scissors, like you're mooning traffic in full competition armor. Your back should be straight from your butt to your shoulders, like you're strapped into an industrial-strength MC back protector. This is the way 165lb powerlifters get 700lbs off the ground every day. Your glutes are huge; use them instead of your back and knees. Push your feet straight down and pull your hips in beneath you.

If you get this motion right, you'll be able to stand up on the bike for days. Shins vertical, gripping the frame. Flexed at the hips, back relaxed and neutral.

I met with a new trainer a few weeks ago. He set up a dead lift with 40lb more than I've ever trained with. I set up as usual and gave him 18 reps. This is the difference between lift/don't lift and lift/go to hospital. I can use that form on a piano without hurting myself. It doesn't come up, but I don't hurt myself.

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