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Cleaning Gunky carbs?

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I just got a old old bike and ive got it mostly running, except for the idle passages in the carbs. Need some ideas on what to soak the SOB's in to get the carbs sqeeky clean again so maybe some idling would be in order.

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paint thinner maybe? as long as it is only metal parts and no rubber

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Go to your local dirt bike shop, or auto zone, pep boys, etc. Pick up a can of carb cleaner and spray it through out the carb. If its really bad they have stronger stuff to soak your carb in rather than spray it. Wear gloves and some goggles when spraying that stuff its pretty nasty.

Edit: Take the jets out and clean them up also because most likely there gunked up inside as well.

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go to your local dealer and ask to use their parts washer for a few minutes.:busted:

or just pick up some solvent and get a metal tub

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Go to your local dirt bike shop, or auto zone, pep boys, etc. Pick up a can of carb cleaner and spray it through out the carb. If its really bad they have stronger stuff to soak your carb in rather than spray it. Wear gloves and some goggles when spraying that stuff its pretty nasty.

Edit: Take the jets out and clean them up also because most likely there gunked up inside as well.

+1:thumbsup:

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I keep a gallon of Chem-Dip carb & parts cleaner on hand. Tear the carb down, put the chemical-safe parts (no o-rings, float or other plastic/rubber parts) in the basket that comes with the cleaner, put the basket back into the gallon can and let the parts soak. For a carb that's as dirty as the one you're describing, I'll let it soak overnight. After pulling the basket from the can of cleaner, I lightly rinse with water, then immediately hit all the parts with compressed air, blowing out all the orifices and other passages.

For me, it's the most thorough and easiest method, and a gallon will last a long time. Just be sure to always wear gloves and eye protection and open the can only in a well-ventilated area...better yet, outside.

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I keep a gallon of Chem-Dip carb & parts cleaner on hand. Tear the carb down, put the chemical-safe parts (no o-rings, float or other plastic/rubber parts) in the basket that comes with the cleaner, put the basket back into the gallon can and let the parts soak. For a carb that's as dirty as the one you're describing, I'll let it soak overnight. After pulling the basket from the can of cleaner, I lightly rinse with water, then immediately hit all the parts with compressed air, blowing out all the orifices and other passages.

For me, it's the most thorough and easiest method, and a gallon will last a long time. Just be sure to always wear gloves and eye protection and open the can only in a well-ventilated area...better yet, outside.

Agree with this one, do it this way the first time and you know it's good to go.

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Toyota has a carb cleaner in a spray can that is some of the best spray type cleaner that I used. Seem to work better on the green stuff than others. Carb cleaner dip tanks are disappearing as fast as carburetors, at least in the automotive field.

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