Multi bike owners, is this normal ?

Hi.

I bought a second sport bike Suzuki GSF/Bandit 1200(1st gen).

And I rolled for a while to familiarize myself with it.

Then I rolled my TT250R, but I felt like i drove very small bike with 50cc engine.

I know TTR has good enough power, and I can drive it like a hell on dirt.

But suddenly I felt so inconvenient with it as if it's engine is choked by being stuffed something in the air intake.

Well, gradually, I could lift up front wheel and I start to feel better as I ride it.

But anyway, I got a question, how do you guys getting along with these impression gaps when you own two totally different motor bikes?

One is road going monster the other is dirt going sleek bike.

I can never go into any sort of dirt with B12, it's ridiculous.

So I have to have TTR. But my body react so differently which just amazed me so much.

Any suggestion?

:busted:

Bikes of a similar performance on and off road make it less noticable. IE CBR600RR for the street and I have the YZ for off road. Both are high performance and I can push the limits on them pretty well so I dont notice the difference because IM concentrating much more on trying to nail that next corner or jump

Biggest thing that makes a difference IMO is the fact you don't twist the throttle near as hard on a regular basis like you would on a dirt ride. So, you ride the Bandit, and you get used to how your need to manipulate the throttle to stay alive. Things like not twisting as hard nor as far around. Then, you jump on the dirt ride and twist the throttle like you were on the Bandit. Makes the dirt bike feel weak. Once your brains makes the adjustment, you start twisting the throttle dirt-style and the dirtibike feels more normal again.

JM

Yeah, I would agree. I just don't notice the performance differences only because I choose the bike for the situation I am riding. And my mindset is in that "dicipline" if you will. As an owner of 35 different bikes and most are specialized for certain types of riding ie. cruiser, sport, vintage sport, sport touring, vintage cruiser, dual sport, pit bike, trials, modern motocross, vintage motocross, offroad ect...

Yeah, I would agree. I just don't notice the performance differences only because I choose the bike for the situation I am riding. And my mindset is in that "dicipline" if you will. As an owner of 35 different bikes and most are specialized for certain types of riding ie. cruiser, sport, vintage sport, sport touring, vintage cruiser, dual sport, pit bike, trials, modern motocross, vintage motocross, offroad ect...

what he said! lol (i only have 7)

I ride an R1 in fast canyons and on the track, and I ride a DRZ for singletrack and as my winter beater bike. The difference between the two is staggering, but if I switch between bikes alot, I just hop on whichever and go, no problems....but if I get more seat time on one than the other (say ride the DRZ all winter, then break out the R1 in the spring) it takes alot of time to get my brain recalibrated.

The solution? Ride both bikes, more often!

I ride my F4i for 2 reasons...hitting the twisty backroads and getting to work on the highway. I guess my mindset when i'm on it is I'm either going to have a BLAST leaning her over, or just cruising to work. Same with when I'm on the XR250...I know I'm riding dirt or just cruising up the street to a friends house. The two bikes are SO different, but I can have the same amount of fun on either.

you need to get a "small" bike for the street , 1200cc is a lot. Get something that you have to wring its neck on the street to get going, then the bikes will feel the same AND be fun, cuz you'll be wringing BOTH of their necks all the time.

I have a 450 and a 125 and I feel the same way when I step down from the 450 to the 125. The transition is easier the other way. I'm pretty sure my lap times are similar with both bikes though.

Thanks for all of your responses.

I am glad to hear all of your opinions.

And I at least feel relieved that so many of you own so many motorbikes.

I wish I could, but the maintenance cost will boost over 400cc here in Japan.

So, I need to stick to thumper of less than 250 which is already quite good for dirt road anyway.

I hope your happy riding!

Best regards.:busted:

I love it. Viva la difference!

Of course my Husaberg is not a 250, but even if it was it is all about weight and handling off road. My getting back in the saddle off-road has helped my confidence and technique on the road.

If anything the Husaberg makes me want to get a lighter street bike, but my Ducati is pretty comfortable so I'll keep it for now. It takes some getting used to - about 15 minutes or so when riding the bikes back to back, but you acclimate.

Over in the USA, Yamaha sells the TTR250, WR250, YZ250F, and YZ250. All 250cc bikes, but the YZ250 has twice the HP aw a TTR250.

The TTR250 is a good bike, but it's not a very powerful bike. You can learn to ride the wheels off that bike and become a much better rider.

About 20 years ago... my older brother had a Triumph 500cc street bike, set up to look like a flattracker. Great bike and capable of going 80 mph on the freeway. One day, he is going to try my YZ125D 2-stroke. 125cc? He's laughing at the little bike.

He gives the YZ125D a hand full of throttle and lets out the clutch. About 20 feet later the front wheel touches the ground again, the bike is ripping, and he is scared. "Umm, yea bro, 2-strokes make almost twice the power as 4-strokes and that bike weighs less than half of your Triumph." He learned to respect dirt bikes.

Yamaha detuned the HP on the YZ125 for the next two years.

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