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engine or clutch problem?

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after doing a search for 'clutch spindle' i only could find a thread for a 350. I have a 06 650. my bike now has 20,000, ( different thread later about that)

my bike has started to whine and i believe it is a clutch problem. after several attempts to get the proper slack at the lever, i can't. I am thinking about adjusting the cable at the spindle. I wanted to know, if looking down from the top of the bike like you were sitting on it, do i move it clockwise or counter clockwise to get some slack? also, on the handlebars, do i loosen the the adjusting screws all the way in or all the way out?

the bike just has no power when opening up the throttle. it just seems to wind out. any other ideas?

thanks.

TT

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after doing a search for 'clutch spindle' i only could find a thread for a 350. I have a 06 650. my bike now has 20,000, ( different thread later about that)

my bike has started to whine and i believe it is a clutch problem. after several attempts to get the proper slack at the lever, i can't. I am thinking about adjusting the cable at the spindle. I wanted to know, if looking down from the top of the bike like you were sitting on it, do i move it clockwise or counter clockwise to get some slack? also, on the handlebars, do i loosen the the adjusting screws all the way in or all the way out?

the bike just has no power when opening up the throttle. it just seems to wind out. any other ideas?

thanks.

TT

Make sure your clutch lever has the specified 1/2" of free play at the ball end. Turn your adjuster(s) inward to increase play. If you've been riding your bike with the clutch partially disengaged (adjustment too tight) for any length of time you will likely need to replace the plates and springs.

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That not the information i wanted to read mx! :busted:

Do you think that I could delay replacement by moving the clutch spindle thingy a notch or two?

How would you rate clutch replacement as far as difficulty?

Thanks mx

TT

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How would you rate clutch replacement as far as difficulty?

Easy.

45min job.

10min job next time.

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That not the information i wanted to read mx! :busted:

Do you think that I could delay replacement by moving the clutch spindle thingy a notch or two?

How would you rate clutch replacement as far as difficulty?

Thanks mx

TT

As Noride mentioned... not a huge or complex job. Unless someone has messed around with the spindle actuator/arm position you shouldn't have to change the spline position. If you can get the free play in the clutch lever before the clutch feels like it is disengaging by adjusting the cable adjusters then changing the arm location on the spindle won't help.

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that's just the thing. i cant get proper clutch lever with only the adjusting nuts near the clutch.

how much for a clutch kit, which brand, where to buy from? Kientech doesnt have them on his site. if i call jess, i know he could probably recommend a kit. he does sell a clutch holding tool.

i have a manual so i guess i will try to get this into motion. if i let it go any longer, what other damage might result from this?

any tips on removing/installing a clutch on a dr650 that i should be aware of? is there anything else i should do or replace since i will have the engine open and the clutch out?

thanks and sorry about all the q's. i know i don't want to take it to a dealer, however, i am sorta hesitant about replacing the clutch on my own. i am going to start searching the forums for more info on this

TT

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ttsquirrel said: that's just the thing. i cant get proper clutch lever with only the adjusting nuts near the clutch.

** If you can't get enough play between using the lever adjuster and the inline cable adjuster you do have some sort of serious issue. Just a worn clutch would not prevent you from being able to adjust free play. So you've spun the lever adjuster all the way in and the inline cable adjuster all the way in and you still have no lever play? If so, barring any other major internal issues, then someone has moved the clutch arm on the spline for some reason. Remove the arm and reset it so you can get the play you need. The arms on both of the DR650's in my garage are pointing at about 1:30 in their relaxed state. You should be able to grab the arm and move it slightly when your play is adjusted properly.

how much for a clutch kit, which brand, where to buy from? Kientech doesnt have them on his site. if i call jess, i know he could probably recommend a kit. he does sell a clutch holding tool.

** Stock is good.... but EBC kits are quite popular. They have a CK3386 basic set and the complete set (DRC87)... which is likely what you need. Here's one.

i have a manual so i guess i will try to get this into motion. if i let it go any longer, what other damage might result from this?

** Yeah, the driven plates are likely fried/warped so the above complete kit will likely be needed if you find it still slips after getting the free play worked out.

any tips on removing/installing a clutch on a dr650 that i should be aware of? is there anything else i should do or replace since i will have the engine open and the clutch out?

** Remove the NSU screws and locktite them! Follow the manual instructions and you will be fine. If you don't own a torque wrench buy one. The spring retaining bolts for the pressure plate are quite easy to snap off if over tightened. Sometimes removing the old cover gasket can end up being the most time consuming part of the job. :thumbsup: Do a good job here to avoid leaks.

thanks and sorry about all the q's. i know i don't want to take it to a dealer, however, i am sorta hesitant about replacing the clutch on my own. i am going to start searching the forums for more info on this

** You can do it! :busted:

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:busted: to mxrob for following up.

your saying your clutch spindle arm is at 1:30? looking at it from the seating position? wouldn't that be sticking out over the oil cap? mine is sitting at the 11:00 and when i pull the clutch in, it moves to about the 10:00. I am the original owner and I have never touched the arm

I am going to go back to the clutch lever and loosen/tighten back and forth to see if i can really get the proper play. however, even if i get the proper play, when i am riding, i think that when I give it full throttle, it still is going to slip.

let's clarify something. sometimes we all just assume we know what we are talking about, we really don't know what the ell we mean.

what are classic, undisputing symtoms of the clutch going bad or slipping?

my problem is that when i am riding and give it alot of throttle, the bike seems to just rev up and very little acceleration. first gear still seems fine, but 2nd and higher, acceleration is very poor. trying to pass trucks sucks right now.

I know you know what you are talking about MX. I just want to make sure I am making the right diagnosis.

anyone in the fresno/dinuba area?

TT

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I think you pretty much described a slipping clutch in your last post.

Go for it. Replacing the clutch is a simple job. A few things of note:

1) When you take the bolts out of the clutch cover, make sure you identify each screw and make note of where it came from because there are several different lengths.

2) Be careful not to lose the O-ring on the oil line.

3) Don't over-torque the bolts and screws when you reassemble. (The big nut inside the clutch basket only gets 36 ft. lb. or something; make sure you have a new lock tab to stake the nut upon reassembly. You don't even have to remove the basket to replace the clutch soft and hard parts but if you can get it off, see item #4.)

4) Lock-Tite the Neutral Switch screws while you have the clutch basket off.

5) Putting the clutch cover back on might try your patience a bit as you engage the clutch actuation mechanism. Don't be surprised if you try one position and find it to be wrong as you get the cover home. Just lift it back off, reposition the clutch arm a bit and try again.

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what are classic, undisputing symtoms of the clutch going bad or slipping?

Slippage is usually the major sign of worn components. The higher the gear the worse the slippage

The other symptom would not bieng able to get any free play.

You have both..... not good.

Just curious, how many miles on the bike and what type of oil have you been using?

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I have 20000 and have used walmart 1040 since i bought the bike new. the oil is not energy conserving, however, i will spend the extra dollar to buy some better quality oil after i change out the clutch.

I have rode single track, off road and highway. I had a 16t on for many miles. biggest detrimental problem was i was not very good with keeping the proper lever slack, IMO. i deserve many :busted:

thanks for the tips.

TT

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well, i just got off the phone with jesse. I told him what problem i had and asked him to send me what i needed to fix it. plates, springs, gasket and lever cable. also ordered some brake pads. parts wont get here until late next week sometime. i'll be posting then when i run into any problems.

here's aquestion though: when looking at fiches, how come you can never see the piano wire that holds the clutch plate?

also, jesse says dont even take off that plate. it is a bugger to get the wire back on. he said that this plate is just a holder, really and that it should not have much wear.

someone said in another thread bout clutch, lay your bike down so that you dont lose your oil when changing the clutch, then change the oil not too long after replacing. is this a good idea? I mean, to change your oil not to long after replacing clutch?

TT

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Yep. Change it a week later. As the clutch beds there'll be some material in the oil.

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ok i got the parts from jess. now i have a bunch a q's b4 i pull the clutch apart sometime this weekend.

do i have to soak the plates in oil? I have read some other posts about clutches and hear people doing this.

I am also replacing the clutch cable. where do i have the adjusting nuts by the grip prior to installing the cable? all the way in, all the way out or in the middle?

I have more questions, but i am at work and break is over. i will also try to get some pics up for future cavemen trying to work on their bikes. pics might help to see what my questions mean.

thanks

TT

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just wondering if i need to soak the clutch plates in oil before installation. going to have a day off and might try to fix the dr. it has been over a month since i have rode and i am really getting depressed. it is affecting my whole life.:bonk:

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Do the plates come with instructions or can you go to the mfgr website and see if they have recommendations? I've left the friction plates soak in oil before installation on all my bikes, but there could be some friction plates that don't require this.

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Well, after procrastinating for months, i am going to fix my bike. i also am replacing the clutch cable. any tips or tricks to get this in correctly? What about when adjusting the cable? just make sure the proper amount of play is at the clutch handle, right?

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Well, after procrastinating for months, i am going to fix my bike. i also am replacing the clutch cable. any tips or tricks to get this in correctly? What about when adjusting the cable? just make sure the proper amount of play is at the clutch handle, right?

If you haven't busted into your clutch yet, I'd take the arm off of the shaft, and see if you can't move it a spline or two. It may have been installed wrong from the beginning. Granted, it's probably done its damage if it's been like that for years, but it might be worth a try. Read through the following paragraph, and just do the arm part...

For the cable, I would take the arm off of the clutch spindle shaft first and set it aside. Then take the new cable and route it next to the old cable. At the clutch lever end, turn the adjusters in as far as they'll go, then out a little so that the slots line up in front, then the cable will slip out, and the ball end comes out of the lever to the bottom. Leave the adjuster there in the perch. To put the new cable in just reverse the steps to take the old one out of the lever. Now, on the other end, attach the sheath just like the old one is attached, then remove the old cable from the bike. Now, take the clutch arm, and insert the ball end of the cable into it. With your other hand, take the splined shaft, and turn it in the direction of disengaging the clutch (just take the slop out of the mechanism). Once you've done this, slip the clutch arm onto the shaft, pulling the cable snug as you do this. IF it goes right on without too much fuss, put the bolt in and snug it down, then check for proper free play. If you can't get enough free play with the adjuster at this point, take the arm off, and move it one spline toward the clutch cable. Now, you'll need to take the slack up with a few turns out on the adjuster to get the clutch lever free play. Recheck all of your nuts and bolts that they're snug, make sure you have no binding or chafing in the clutch cable routing, and take her for a spin. Just remember, when putting the arm on the shaft, no tools are needed. If you use pliers to twist the shaft to get the arm on, you'll likely not have the proper amount of adjustment available, causing your clutch to slip. Also, if you have the clutch cable a little tight on a brand new clutch, as it breaks in, the cable will get tighter, and end up slipping. Make sure you look at the clutch lever play often after you put your new clutch in.

And if you have gnarly clutch plates, please try to take some pics. We're all about pics here....:smirk::banana::ride::banana:

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I am working on the clutch replacement right now. I have some springs that jesse gave me to replace the old one. the new springs are 1 coil longer than the stock ones. am i still going to use 7 ft lbs of torque?

your quick reply is appreciated. :excuseme:

TT

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