XR650L Swingarm on NX650?

Has anyone done this? Does anyone know if its possible? I would really like to get a rear disc brake on my NX, plus it opens up the possibility of doing a SM set-up in the long run.

If not an XR650L swingarm, does anyone know how to adapt a disc brake system to the NX swingarm w/o it looking all messed up? Thanks

There HAS to be someone that thought about this...

Has anyone done this? Does anyone know if its possible? I would really like to get a rear disc brake on my NX, plus it opens up the possibility of doing a SM set-up in the long run.

If not an XR650L swingarm, does anyone know how to adapt a disc brake system to the NX swingarm w/o it looking all messed up? Thanks

No, they are not compatable. I believe it could be done if you fabbed a new suspension mount on the XRL swingarm.

Using an '87-89 CBR600 rear wheel/brakes is an easy conversion. See this thread, start at post #51:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=735533

Somewhere in the thread is a link to a guys NX build in Spain. He used an XRR alu. swingarm, but had to make a new suspension mount for it.

why? in the world would you do this in the first place?

why? in the world would you do this in the first place?

For the same reason you would do this:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=721978

or this:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=319441

or these:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=456542

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=735533

http://www.supermotojunkie.com/showthread.php?t=23824

http://www.rallytwin.com/ (see the History link)

What it really comes down to is some of us just like wrenching. One thing I really like about TT is there are fewer people who ask why and more people that ask for pictures of the project. I bought my CBR600 parts bike for $100, took the parts I needed and sold the remainder of the parts for $300. Some people would say "Why not sell the NX and buy an XRL"? But this way's cheaper and a lot more fun, and you get to ride a one-of-a-kind bike that handles just like you set it up too.

For the same reason you would do this:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=721978

or this:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=319441

or these:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=456542

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=735533

http://www.supermotojunkie.com/showthread.php?t=23824

http://www.rallytwin.com/ (see the History link)

What it really comes down to is some of us just like wrenching. One thing I really like about TT is there are fewer people who ask why and more people that ask for pictures of the project. I bought my CBR600 parts bike for $100, took the parts I needed and sold the remainder of the parts for $300. Some people would say "Why not sell the NX and buy an XRL"? But this way's cheaper and a lot more fun, and you get to ride a one-of-a-kind bike that handles just like you set it up too.

I gotcha, I'm good with that.... :busted:

I can't believe I came across this now somehow, as I'm wanting to do the same thing. The reason? The drum is wearing out, and parts are getting hard to find for this 23 year old machine (plus I don't want to spend $300+ for a new hub, then get it spoked, trued, balanced, blah, blah, blah). 

 

Thumpmeister, did you have any luck with this? Ever get it resolved, and if so, what parts did you use? 

From what I'm learning, the UK bikes had disc brakes from the start. Whether that's the same for other Euro models, I don't know. 

I think Australia started with disc in 1990, but that's unconfirmed. 

 

Measurements taken from a seller in the UK on Ebay, it seems they're an exact match:

Hi - Yes, all the UK NX650s had rear disc brakes - from the Honda manual I had, the European NX500 had a drum brake. I think the 500cc version was sold in Europe due to licence restrictions, but I don't know why it (and the US model) had a drum brake - maybe due to brake efficiency?

Anywho - the dimensions are as follows:

end of the swing arm to the center of the pivot bolt = 595mm
end of the swing arm to the center of the shock mounting bolt = 420mm
width of the swing arm at the pivot bolt. = 204mm

Regards
 

My swing arm at pivot bolt measurement seemed larger (219 mm), but it's also installed in the bike, so hard to get an accurate reading. 

I'm curious, if it worked out for you. 

Have a great one, 

Dre

Well, just to see this conversation come full circle, I finally went thru with it and now have a disc rear brake on my USA-model 1989 Honda NX650, so yes, it can be done!

 

The full story, with pictures:

 

Researching this project, I was initially led to believe just a hub change was needed + the disc brake components; however, the drawings and part numbers were misleading, and it soon became apparent the entire swing arm needed to be swapped.

After checking out my setup and taking measurements 01%20-%20RD02%20Measurements_zpsebnpdrdv, I found a really cool guy in Germany via ebay that didn't mind measuring components to check fit. It turns out, the RD02 Dommie parts are a bolt-on fit for the U.S. model! The only things missing: 2 eyelets on the frame and a small bracket for the fluid reservoir.

So, I bought a rear wheel, swing arm, brake components (complete with a new brake pedal) and pilion foot pegs on ebay from German RD02 machines for a total cost of around $225. I thought about using the one for a RD09, but was nervous the suspension points could have changed + a nice RD02 swing arm presented itself. As a bonus, it made a nice parcel of checked baggage on the plane! :)

Once home, a plan was put together and a parts list assembled. 02%20-%20The%20Plan_zpsg5mrcjgo.jpg

Laying everything out in the garage 03%20-%20Everything%20You%20See%20Here_z, I figured the biggest challenge would be the eyelets, but that was resolved thru the use of a flat connector plate used to connect 2x4's in housing 04%20-%20Plate%20Material_zpsgjoocanw.jp. I cut it to fit (2.5"x1.5"), then drilled the hole for the lower pilion bolt and 2 others to act as the missing eyelet screws 05%20-%20Ready%20to%20Mount_zpsekmpjrlz..
Where I actually ran into trouble was with the darned fluid reservoir! In 1992, I had added cases from the East German MZ ETZ 250, and the brake fluid reservoir needed to be right where my support bracket was attaching to the frame. Grrrrrrr!!

After much planning, measuring, countless mock-ups and a sleepless night or two, I decided to move the mounting point of the bracket to an empty hole in the frame and change the fluid mounting bracket location, too. In a cool twist of fate, after the change, I was able to mount the reservoir using the original rubber grommets and use the new foot pegs 06%20-%20Reservoir%20Bracket_zpsrxcbjtwd!
07%20-%20Mock%20Up_zpsiym945al.jpg
Once everything was finally set, the new swing arm did, indeed, bolt right on. Both plates went into place, and with some encouraging, so did the disc brake setup. Things were looking goooooood 09%20-%20New%20Close_zps9lqmin1f.jpg

08%20%20-%20New%20Setup_zpsg1jpfjul.jpg!!

Unfortunately, I was not, and manages only a short ride around the parking lot before succumbing to a nasty flu bug 10%20-%20Success_zpsbmf1rdwf.jpg!

Almost a week later, once I could remain vertical, off I went for a trip to the hills overlooking Santa Cruz 11%20-%20Lets%20Ride_zpslbsjhngo.jpg! It's awesome! Quiet! and Fun!! Of course, most of you have already experienced that, but for those of us in the U.S.A., with our noisy drum brakes, it's still a novelty! 

Someday, the swing arm will be painted and the rim swapped back to silver, but right now, I'm just happy it goes (and stops!!)!

Happy trails,
Dre

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