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RM 250 Project

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First off, I've never ridden a two stroke, have only ridden yamaha's and am now a proud owner of 01 RM250 in a box! I was told the motor needs a complete top and bottom rebuild, but the price is right and for what I paid for it I am sure I could part it out and get my money back and then some but what fun is that. Looks like the perfect winter project for me. Any tips or suggestions would be appreciated since I plan on doing all the work myself and have never rebuilt an engine. And yes, I already have a manual.....

Bear with me I don't know exactly how to post pics.....

The night I brought it home

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Engine

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The teardown

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The Mess

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Primer

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Finished Frame

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Progress so far.....

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Ahhhh.To start fresh and rebuild your own bike. That's where it's at my friend.Good luck.

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Damn, where does everyone find these f'n projects?!?! I never find anything like that!

BTW: Scrap the project, sell me the frame and forks! :bonk:

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Go slow and enjoy yourself. If you get frustrated walk away for a couple of hours/days. The process can be as fun as the finished product as long as you do not drive yourself crazy. Have a good winter.

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Good luck with it! I did a 2000 KX250 in worse shape than that. It's alot of fun, just try to stick to a budget unless you plan on keeping the bike a very long time.

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Frame looks great!

I'm not really sure how you plan to install the engine, but that isn't the order I assembled the parts when I did mine. I suppose you have a little while before it will be ready so the rolling chassis is probably smart.

Not really sure what your budget is, but I had to buy a couple things to finish my engine rebuild.

Tusk case Splitter.

(Tusk) clutch holder/stater holder - though I'm not seeing the same holes on your stator for the dual purpose tool to work.

Small propane torch.

That was it though.

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Thanks for the comments guys, yea the goal is to get a rolling chassis first and then start the motor once I save up for the tools and rebuild kit. I have most of the rolling chassis parts already so I figured I might as well assemble it to see what I may be missing. Plan on getting the Tusk case splitter, Crank Puller/Installer, Flywheel Puller, and Clutch Holder. I figure it will cost be about $150 for the tools, $300-$350 for the rebuild kit. I bought the thing for $300 so once I get it going and put back together I should have right around a grand in it.

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looks like it has a ama sticker on the fram.how about the suspension has it has some work done?

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damn looks like a fun winter, and that frame job looks awesome. good luck

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$300 !!!!!!!!! sweet!!

One thing to consider, unless you plan on needing a case splitter again you could save yourself $100 and just bring the engine in and let a dealer split the cases for you. They do not have to do anything else, just split the cases and that's it.

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Thanks for the comments guys, yea the goal is to get a rolling chassis first and then start the motor once I save up for the tools and rebuild kit. I have most of the rolling chassis parts already so I figured I might as well assemble it to see what I may be missing. Plan on getting the Tusk case splitter, Crank Puller/Installer, Flywheel Puller, and Clutch Holder. I figure it will cost be about $150 for the tools, $300-$350 for the rebuild kit. I bought the thing for $300 so once I get it going and put back together I should have right around a grand in it.

The Flywheel Puller isn't really neccesary although you might need one with all the rust on your stator.

The crank puller and installer is what the propane torch is for. Also does bearings for you. Removing the crank is as easy as heating the bearing it remains in when you split the cases. When you heat the cases and drop the bearing in the remaining heat in the cases will transfer to your bearing then the crank will slide right in.

Although tools are never a bad investment. :bonk:

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Yea supposedily the suspension is done on it. Not sure what it is set up for though. It has a sticker on the forks showing the setup but I can't make out the rider settings on it. It has worn off. Suspension will be the first thing I look into once I get it running and solid. Good idea about taking it to a shop to have the cases split. Never thought about that but then again, for $59 I can buy a case splitter and add that to my tool collection. Never know I might enjoy playing with these RMs and make this an annual winter thing!

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You're on the right track. I went ahead and bought the case splitter and let a shop pull the blind bearings for me. I just couldn't afford to buy the kit. It turned out to be the right decision because of my inexperience

I ended up splitting the cases a couple of times in "trial and error"

Next time I build a bike I will probably spring for the blind bearing puller

and a good-size press. A small parts cleaner bin from harborfrieght would also be great.

Have fun doing the motor. I truly enjoyed building mine. Nothing in the world like starting an engine you just rebuilt!!!! :bonk:

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Good luck with it! I did a 2000 KX250 in worse shape than that. It's alot of fun, just try to stick to a budget unless you plan on keeping the bike a very long time.

Budget?? Whats that??

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I got curious and played around with the motor this weekend even though the wife hasn't cut me loose to buy parts / tools yet. I wanted to see if the piston and cylinder were messed up or if it was mainly the bottom end like I was told. I can move the crank back and forth slightly but cannot get the rod to pivot independently.

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What does it mean to replate and how can you tell? How much does that cost?

Well, I say that because if I'm going to the effort of installing new components (ie, pistons) on a bike whose maintenance history is a mystery, I'm going to replate and call it good.

The cylinders are plated with nickel or nickasil(sp?) and if the bore is scored/grooved or not smooth, the replating will correct this. Obviously, if its too bad, you may need to bore it, but it doesn't look too bad to me. I had mine done by PowerSeal USA for around $220. I was really impressed with the work and I have the peace of mind that at least I have a completely fresh cylinder to go along with my piston.

You don't need to replate every time you swap pistons, but in this case, starting out with an unknown bike, I would just do it. You can check it with a mic to measure the bore, and visually inspect, and feel for damage as well. Its just peace of mind to me.

Oh yeah, that piece of piston that broke off couldn't have been good for the cylinder or anything else for that matter.

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