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any way to make 200's lower?

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I have a friend I am trying to get back into biking. He complains his legs are too short and always fell over when stopped. I know one buddy on a Yamaha used a yamalink and a shorter seat and he loves it but no linkage to play with and I am trying to bring him to the orange side. He used to have a wr426 so pretty big and heavy I am guessing. I don't know how much sliding fork tubes up and having poor rear sag affects the handling, quite a bit I would guess even when he probably will be taking it easy a bunch. Any good ways besides cheating with the suspension as I don't think just taking out some foam in the seat will be enough, not much foam in those things to begin with. Is the 200 the same frame etc as all the ktm full size bikes? He may be looking at a 250 or 300 just for the estart as he comlained also about trying to start bikes on a side hill. Thanks

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200 and 125 the same, 250 and 300 the same.

You can shorten by having the suspension shortened professionally or by using a Synergy X bushing in the rear and sliding the forks up in the front. Also some guys in the older bikes would cut the subframe to lower the rear of the seat.

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my fiancee is 5'3". We use a shorter seat and lowered the suspension 1.5" (1" on her race bike). That seems to be plenty.

Note that the 200 and 250/300 have exactly the same seat height.

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my fiancee is 5'3". We use a shorter seat and lowered the suspension 1.5" (1" on her race bike). That seems to be plenty.

Note that the 200 and 250/300 have exactly the same seat height.

What about fork tube height, did you slide them up in the tripple clamps or actually have them shortened internally as well as the rear? My friend is probably 5'6" anyway but short legs to go with it, possibly he just needs a short seat and an e start, maybe that rear bushing. It's nice to make easily reversible changes so when you sell it's back to stock.

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Call Ian at www.ridersedgesuspension.com in Vernon, B.C.

He lowered my wife's '07 200XC and it works great.

Dave

I will give him a call to see what all is entailed. From the looks of your signature/garage I would say you could singlehandedly keep him in business, and I thought I hated servicing all my stuff.

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What about fork tube height, did you slide them up in the tripple clamps or actually have them shortened internally as well as the rear? My friend is probably 5'6" anyway but short legs to go with it, possibly he just needs a short seat and an e start, maybe that rear bushing. It's nice to make easily reversible changes so when you sell it's back to stock.

forks also lowered. There really isn't room to slide them up in the clamps enough to matter. We don't worry about when we sell because no one would buy our bikes anyway (her 07 has over 11,000 hard offroad miles on it already.

At any rate, the fork lowering just requires a spacer and a shorter spring, so it would be easy to reverse if you keep the stock springs, then you can lower the next bike more cheaply too, if it's similar components.

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I will give him a call to see what all is entailed. From the looks of your signature/garage I would say you could singlehandedly keep him in business, and I thought I hated servicing all my stuff.

LOL! It CAN be a bit overwhelming some times, can't it.....then there's the tractor, a couple collector cars, etc. etc. :bonk:

Actually, Ian's done some work for us over the years and we've known him from the racing scene, but of all the bikes in the garage currently, the wife's 200XC is the only one that needed substantial work. My son is complaining his XC is too stiff as well, though so......

I know dozens of guys who have had him do suspension work and he's always well spoken of. He also lowered a friend's wife's DR350 dual sport.

anyhow, give him a call; he's a good guy. Tell him Dave Pelletier sent you.

Cheers,

Dave

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+1 on the synergy X bushing. It allows the rear to be lowered .5" thru. 1.5" IIRC and it's way le$$.

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This may not be what you are looking for, but I'll give this advice anyway.

Don't spend the money on lowering a bike. Falling over while a newbie is because your friend lacks the experience to know there and how to stop.

Do notice and take advantage of natural ruts, or unlevel terrain to place your wheels lower that where you intend to plant your foot.

Most importantly, when stopping (or doing a donut), slide your ass off the side you intend to plant your foot so that your hips are off the bike and you other leg is over the seat. Nobody really teaches these basics. The collective wisdom on this forum for more tips will be useful - try starting a thread in the off-road section.

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This may not be what you are looking for, but I'll give this advice anyway.

Don't spend the money on lowering a bike. Falling over while a newbie is because your friend lacks the experience to know there and how to stop.

Do notice and take advantage of natural ruts, or unlevel terrain to place your wheels lower that where you intend to plant your foot.

Most importantly, when stopping (or doing a donut), slide your ass off the side you intend to plant your foot so that your hips are off the bike and you other leg is over the seat. Nobody really teaches these basics. The collective wisdom on this forum for more tips will be useful - try starting a thread in the off-road section.

Some valid points. Two observations, though;

- 1) you don't always stop where you plan to.

- 2) It depends on how short his legs really are; my wife is 5'4" and the stock 200XC was just too tall for her. Sure she could use some techniques to help with that, but ultimately full size dirt bikes with 37"+ seat heights were not designed for people that short.

Professional lowering isn't for everyone and it is expensive compared to the alternatives, but it is the best way to go if you need (or want) the best.

Dave

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This may not be what you are looking for, but I'll give this advice anyway.

Don't spend the money on lowering a bike. Falling over while a newbie is because your friend lacks the experience to know there and how to stop.

Do notice and take advantage of natural ruts, or unlevel terrain to place your wheels lower that where you intend to plant your foot.

My experience has been that lowering a bike for a shorter person (5-3") led to a dramatic increase in confidence and enjoyment, and within a few months, a dramatic increase in speed and skill. As a result of lowering the bike 16 months ago, my fiancee now rides most everything in the idaho backcountry (some of the most challenging and interesting trails in the world), and has gone from being the speed of a good c rider to getting on the podium at a national enduro, and finishing 14th overall in B's (men) at idaho city.

Upsides = Faster, safer, much more fun.

Downsides = have to be a little more careful in deep ruts.

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