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Clutchless shifting vs Powershifting?

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Which is healthier for the bike, and which is faster out on the track?

I usually find myself powershifting when i'm on the ground, clutchless when I'm in the air and want to be in a different gear when I land, just wondering if thats what the fastest way is to do it.

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The transmissions in these bikes today are just about bullet proof. You can treat them almost anyway you like. As far as what is faster, you can down shift with out the clutch almost any time as long as the rpm range is acceptable. Up shifting can be a little tougher. When you want to up shift apply upward pressure to the lever if it does not go under wide open throttle you may need to bump the clutch lever or blip the throttle which ever is easier for you. Bumping the clutch is the first alternative, either way is quick and undetectable to lap times with enough practice.

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I personally find myself doing both. If I need to shift quick on the face of a jump, I'll powershift. If I'm shutting down for a turn, I'll more than likely downshift without the clutch. Sometimes If I'm shifting on a sweeper and dont want to spin the rear tire I'll sneak in another gear by upshifting without the clutch.

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have worked on many bikes from that you have 3 gears your tranie that have 4 lock tips on the side of them and they will round out. and you will lose a gear if you do this.

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I'm not sure exactly what Mike is talking about. I know everything wears out at some point. I have raced a lot in the past as an A rider and I beat my transmission like the devil trying to break a spirit. I have broken a lot of things including breaking the shifter off, I broke the shift shaft in half, I even broke the shifter pawl of the end of the shift shaft, but I have never broken any pieces of the gear stacks, shift drum, or the shift forks. If you plan on replacing your bikes every few years do whatever makes you the fastest. If you plan on keeping your bikes for 5 to 10 years or longer your going to have to be careful with them because they will wear out and break. The faster you are the faster they wear out.

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The transmissions in these bikes today are just about bullet proof. You can treat them almost anyway you like. As far as what is faster, you can down shift with out the clutch almost any time as long as the rpm range is acceptable. Up shifting can be a little tougher. When you want to up shift apply upward pressure to the lever if it does not go under wide open throttle you may need to bump the clutch lever or blip the throttle which ever is easier for you. Bumping the clutch is the first alternative, either way is quick and undetectable to lap times with enough practice.

I disagree. They're making everything lighter, trying to save weight now, making things in general weaker. It's not that you will break things, but like Mike said, the shifting forks will give a little, and possibly bend, which won't engage the gear dogs enough, and when they start to round, it's case splitting time. If you replace your bike every year, or like to spend extra money and time wrenching, then bang her as hard as you want.:excuseme:

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normal shift ==> roll throttle off, pull clutch in, now shift

speed/power (full power) shift ==> leave throttle wide open, pull clutch in, now shift

(( if you are not doing this one on the holeshot you probably don't know what a holeshot is ! lol ))

clutchless shift ==> roll throttle off, don't even touch clutch, now shift

(( this is very common, everywhere on the track, once rider gets tired ))

full power clutchless shift ==> leave throttle wide open, don't even touch clutch, now shift

(( usually you have to time this shift so that it coincides with a bump on the track so that your rear wheel goes airborne for a second and unloads the drivetrain. otherwise it just won't shift. some bikes will anyway but its rather rare. most need a little bump to get it done. of all shifts, this is the most radical. not speaking for 125's 2-s. they may have an easier time of it. this shift, is probably the only one I'd consider "tough" on the tranny))

Sic...

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ive been racing my 98 yz250 since 99 and i cant remember ever using the clutch except for starts and if i need to fan the clutch a little commin out of a corner! i beat the hell outta my bike on the track (wide open shifting) about 95% of the time and ive never had a single problem with my tranny! had a couple disagreements with the top end but never any with any gears.

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i cant believe you guys do this no clutch shifting crap!!! Are you really that lazy, or do you just like smoking ur clutches??? There is a reason a clutch is on your bike, and its not just for getting out of neutral, blieve it or not!!!

Edited by Deebsz
spell

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Get an ez pull clutch, and/or extend your clutch arm, makes pulling the clutch effortless, 1 finger clutching all day everyday for hours on end with zero fatigue.

I can see if your RACING for top positions and would rather win then keep your bike running good, then bang wide open shifts and ride it like you stole it.

If you want your bike to last, want it to be reliable, and there isn't a prize at the end of your track/trail, then let of the throttle and pull in the clutch to shift :excuseme:

That's my 2 cents on the subject. Some will argue.. But I'll continue using my clutch since clutches are a hell of a lot easier to replace, cheaper to replace, and they still last a long ass time using it. 36k+ on my sport bikes stock clutch and still going strong, and all I do is wheelie it constantly using the clutch, and ride the clutch hard launching from a stop :bonk:

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I don't understand this powershift and stuff. I use the clutch on downshifting and don't use the clutch on upshifting. But I let off the throttle for like 1/4 second while shifting. I don't use the clutch in the air though.

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have worked on many bikes from that you have 3 gears your tranie that have 4 lock tips on the side of them and they will round out. and you will lose a gear if you do this.
I disagree. They're making everything lighter, trying to save weight now, making things in general weaker. It's not that you will break things, but like Mike said, the shifting forks will give a little, and possibly bend, which won't engage the gear dogs enough, and when they start to round, it's case splitting time. If you replace your bike every year, or like to spend extra money and time wrenching, then bang her as hard as you want.:excuseme:
normal shift ==> roll throttle off, pull clutch in, now shift

speed/power (full power) shift ==> leave throttle wide open, pull clutch in, now shift

(( if you are not doing this one on the holeshot you probably don't know what a holeshot is ! lol ))

clutchless shift ==> roll throttle off, don't even touch clutch, now shift

(( this is very common, everywhere on the track, once rider gets tired ))

full power clutchless shift ==> leave throttle wide open, don't even touch clutch, now shift

(( usually you have to time this shift so that it coincides with a bump on the track so that your rear wheel goes airborne for a second and unloads the drivetrain. otherwise it just won't shift. some bikes will anyway but its rather rare. most need a little bump to get it done. of all shifts, this is the most radical. not speaking for 125's 2-s. they may have an easier time of it. this shift, is probably the only one I'd consider "tough" on the tranny))

Sic...

Everything they said is correct

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I normally just chop the throttle to shift, it's buttery smooth, I don't see how it could be damaging anything. On the holeshot, and some spots on the track, I hold it wide open and just slip the clutch slightly so it'll slide into gear.

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what i do no is if any one of them gears brake you will go down no dought. i had a buddie i ride with. wile rideing we took a rest an he told me his 4th gear was choppy. so i took it for a test ride. i got to 4th gear and i gave her hell it jerked 3 or 4 times and locked up. at around 50 maby 60 broke my coller bone. riped every muscle in my sholder. they said the onley thing holding my arm on was the skin. that was in 99. still hard to sleep the onley time it dosent hurt is when i am useing it. it fills like it falls a sleep when i sit still. its you boddie. a lesson you dont have to lern the hard way.

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Get an ez pull clutch, and/or extend your clutch arm, makes pulling the clutch effortless, 1 finger clutching all day everyday for hours on end with zero fatigue.

I can see if your RACING for top positions and would rather win then keep your bike running good, then bang wide open shifts and ride it like you stole it.

If you want your bike to last, want it to be reliable, and there isn't a prize at the end of your track/trail, then let of the throttle and pull in the clutch to shift :excuseme:

That's my 2 cents on the subject. Some will argue.. But I'll continue using my clutch since clutches are a hell of a lot easier to replace, cheaper to replace, and they still last a long ass time using it. 36k+ on my sport bikes stock clutch and still going strong, and all I do is wheelie it constantly using the clutch, and ride the clutch hard launching from a stop :bonk:

have worked on many bikes from that you have 3 gears your tranie that have 4 lock tips on the side of them and they will round out. and you will lose a gear if you do this.
I disagree. They're making everything lighter, trying to save weight now, making things in general weaker. It's not that you will break things, but like Mike said, the shifting forks will give a little, and possibly bend, which won't engage the gear dogs enough, and when they start to round, it's case splitting time. If you replace your bike every year, or like to spend extra money and time wrenching, then bang her as hard as you want.:smirk:
i cant believe you guys do this no clutch shifting crap!!! Are you really that lazy, or do you just like smoking ur clutches??? There is a reason a clutch is on your bike, and its not just for getting out of neutral, blieve it or not!!!

First of all Mike, I'm sorry to see you are dealing with such trauma from that accident, I wouldn't wish that on anyone. I don't want to beat a dead horse here but I just realized that some of the people on this site are unreasonable and unwise. Maybe you should tell the rest of the story about the bike that you got hurt on, (how old was it?) describe your ability to ride a motorcycle in terms of motocross, and possibly think out your diagnostic procedures a little further before your hurt yourself again, instead of trying to put a scare into this guy that is just seeking advice on one of the most basic skills of motocross.

Towlieee, it's not all about fatigue, it's about speed. Contrary to what you may believe, racing and winning doesn't go hand and hand with a bike that doesn't run good.

This goes out to Mike and the rest of you guys, have you ever ridden a bike that had the transmission polished and massaged to reduce friction, unlock some hidden horse power, and allow for less effort on shift engagement. I wont go into details, but in some cases they actually remove metal from these already lighter and generally weaker transmissions. (That part was for you timoyz1)

Deebsz, This guy is trying to learn how to shift quickly, it's obvious you do not know how to do this so stay out of the conversation if you don't have anything helpful to put in print.

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Full throttle upshifts with no clutch. Everytime, every bike, never had a problem. Who races and doesn't do this? Listen to racers at the start. Only beginners let off the gas, pull in the clutch, shift the gear, then get back on the gas. You wont hear the fast guys even shift.

I and my brothers have been racing for thirty years and everyone we know and ride with shifts this way.

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Full throttle upshifts with no clutch. Everytime, every bike, never had a problem. Who races and doesn't do this? Listen to racers at the start. Only beginners let off the gas, pull in the clutch, shift the gear, then get back on the gas. You wont hear the fast guys even shift.

I and my brothers have been racing for thirty years and everyone we know and ride with shifts this way.

Not everyone races every second they are riding :excuseme:

Most my riding personally is casual, high paced, but casual.

I do agree though, if your racing, ride it like you stole it. :bonk:

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i cant believe you guys do this no clutch shifting crap!!! Are you really that lazy, or do you just like smoking ur clutches??? There is a reason a clutch is on your bike, and its not just for getting out of neutral, blieve it or not!!!

Who has heard of smoking a clutch by NOT using it? :excuseme:

The issue here is the tranny, NOT the clutch. There is no extra wear placed on the clutch by not using it to shift. BLIEVE it or not!

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I don't understand this powershift and stuff. I use the clutch on downshifting and don't use the clutch on upshifting. But I let off the throttle for like 1/4 second while shifting. I don't use the clutch in the air though.

Try doing the opposite of what you have posted above.

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