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heated gear/electrical stuff on a DRZ kicker

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I just bought a 2000 DRZ 400 kick start model that has been converted with a dual sport kit, for riding on and off road.

I was trouble shooting a taillight and blinker issue last night, and realized the bike does not have a battery. I would like to install a power outlet for a GPS, and maybe be able to run heated grips and a heated vest.

is is possible to do so on this bike?

Since it has lights and blinkers, it obviously makes some 12V power. But, how much power does it make and how much can I tap into for accessories??

Thanks for any info.

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Stator on your kicker makes 150watts. Usable total is about 120 watts. Figure worse case loghting load (High beam, tail, brake, signals and horn on). What is left you can use

OK, sounds good. Thanks for the info.

I guess since there is no battery, if I were to connect things, I would connect, for power, to where this dual sport kit gets its power, which was previously the head light wires, yes?

I guess the other good side of no battery is, no worries about leaving anything on and draining the battery. :moon:

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You should connect all wiring (through a fuse of course) to the output at the stator.

LOL, I forgot to include the CDI/ingnition coil, that is about 30 watts.

Good bit of info. I wondered how much wattage it cost just to run the bike.

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You should connect all wiring (through a fuse of course) to the output at the stator.

LOL, I forgot to include the CDI/ingnition coil, that is about 30 watts.

yeah, is that 30 watts basically it takes to run the motorcycle, and thus why you said 120 left over?? Can I test, with a multimeter, to see what each component uses? Like the head light, brakelight,etc?

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I think you can get a close enough idea just by the wattage rating of the bulbs that are in each location, not sure about the horn though.

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BNest thing to do with heated item on a DED is to run a controller off the stator. Then you can control how much power you are pulling. Run an in line fuse like PP's have stated.

Also look into EXO gear they have their own battery packs so you carry your power with you and dont have to worry about jerking cords out when you get off the bike.

I personally like heated gloves better b/c they put more heat where you feel is and draw less power.

Check exo2theheatinside.com

img.mwswcol.jpg

img.jacket.gif

img.pack.gif

img.controller.gif

img.heatband.gif

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yeah, is that 30 watts basically it takes to run the motorcycle, and thus why you said 120 left over?? Can I test, with a multimeter, to see what each component uses? Like the head light, brakelight,etc?

You really should look at the individual bulbs.

Headlight - High beam (assumes you can only run one beam at a time, high is typically the larger draw) 35 to 65 watts

Tail light and stop light, add these together. (typically 34 and 23 watts or there abouts)

2 X the draw of a blinker (typically about 34 watts each)

20 watts for a horn

30 for the CDI

Using this list, going with the high numbers, total draw is about 240 watts. The E, S and SM can get away with this as the battery makes up for the temporary usage of the stop, blinkers and horn. So on these bikes, the draw is 128 with the available balance (about 50 watts) used to keep the battery charged. This is roughly calculated leaving a safety margin of 20%.

Your kicker only puts out 150 watts, 120 of which you can use. If your headlight is 35 watts, your signals and tail light are all LED's and you run a piezo horn the draw of these is about 45 watts. So total draw would be about 110 watts, leaving only 10 to play with. A battery in the mix would help a bit.

Keep in mind the wattage is based on the engine at or above 4,000 rpm. the output can be significantly less at idle. You do not want to over load the system as the stator will get burnt out quickly.

But do the math on your bike.

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You really should look at the individual bulbs.

Headlight - High beam (assumes you can only run one beam at a time, high is typically the larger draw) 35 to 65 watts

Tail light and stop light, add these together. (typically 34 and 23 watts or there abouts)

2 X the draw of a blinker (typically about 34 watts each)

20 watts for a horn

30 for the CDI

Using this list, going with the high numbers, total draw is about 240 watts. The E, S and SM can get away with this as the battery makes up for the temporary usage of the stop, blinkers and horn. So on these bikes, the draw is 128 with the available balance (about 50 watts) used to keep the battery charged. This is roughly calculated leaving a safety margin of 20%.

Your kicker only puts out 150 watts, 120 of which you can use. If your headlight is 35 watts, your signals and tail light are all LED's and you run a piezo horn the draw of these is about 45 watts. So total draw would be about 110 watts, leaving only 10 to play with. A battery in the mix would help a bit.

Keep in mind the wattage is based on the engine at or above 4,000 rpm. the output can be significantly less at idle. You do not want to over load the system as the stator will get burnt out quickly.

But do the math on your bike.

Thanks. I appreciate you laying it all out like that. I have never been in a spot to worry about power consumption on my street bikes..so I never put much thought into it.

I'll see if I can add up what I have. I will probably upgrade to what I can, to LED systems as soon as I get through inspection here with in the next 14 days.

The bike also has a dual sport kit on it, made by Procycle. They have a 12V regulator/rectify 3/4 of the way down the page,that looks interesting and easy to wire in. If you click on their " wiring diagram", its goes to a Trailtech PDF.

Hummm, I already have a small battery, seen below....I was trying to sell it, but it may be worthwhile to hang onto and install in the bike??

sell19.jpg

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OK, so in giving this some more thought.....I will probably not need heated gear anytime soon, with this bike. For most of the next couple months....most of my riding will limited on road...only to get off road as soon as possible. My speeds off road will be lower, and my "working" level" will be higher...which should keep me warmer.

So, for right now, I am nixing the idea of heated gear, for this bike, but still wanna wire in an outlet for any GPS I wanna use. There should be enough excess power in system right now, to at least power a GPS and not worry about anything, correct? I am thinking about just hard wiring a 12V outlet right to where the DS kit gets its power from, which, I think is basically the output wires from the stator.

Any precautions I should take on that, other than a 10-15 amp fuse in the hot side??

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GPS draw should not be a problem. Keep in mind, without a battery to deal with power fluctuations, you had better hope the electrics of the GPS is robust.

Your fuse to the GPS need not be larger than 3 amp.

I would confirm the ability of the GPS to deal with the power variations. Some units, the power only charges its' internal battery in which case you should be OK. Contact the manufacturer via email and get it in writing it will be OK. Be sure to tell them the bike does not have a battery.

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GPS draw should not be a problem. Keep in mind, without a battery to deal with power fluctuations, you had better hope the electrics of the GPS is robust.

Your fuse to the GPS need not be larger than 3 amp.

I would confirm the ability of the GPS to deal with the power variations. Some units, the power only charges its' internal battery in which case you should be OK. Contact the manufacturer via email and get it in writing it will be OK. Be sure to tell them the bike does not have a battery.

I wonder if one of these 12 V headlight regulators would solve that issue as well, if wired inline, but instead of to the headlight, to the outlet.

http://www.procycle.us/dskits/dskit.htm#kit1 ( little less than half way down page on left side)

I know on my TomTom, that I use for me street bike, it had all kinds of capacitors and what not, in the plug, to prevent spikes from damaging anything.

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