Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Cutting your rotors

Recommended Posts

So I'm in the middle of a rebuild and got to thinking, instead of dropping $120 or so buying wave rotors, why not cut the ones I have. I have access to all the tools needed to do it so it would be pretty easy.

Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am thinking it would be hard to get a even pattern in the stock rotor unless you got some crazy machinery. Like some kinda cnc laser thing.

Tusk wave rotors are cheap. 60 bucks with free shipping.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=140359949497&crlp=1_263602_263622&ff4=263602_263622&viewitem=&guid=5c04b30c1230a02652c072f0fff014d5&rvr_id=&ua=%3F*F%3F&itemid=140359949497

Edited by r00t4rd3d

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, the pattern would be easy to copy, print to size then trace onto your old rotors. The hard part is the cutting tools to do the job. So, if you have the tools, go for it. What's the worst that can happen? If it doesn't work out, you may have to buy the $64 Tusk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i can only imagine how much time that would take up, might as well use that time instead to lube all your bearings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What's the worst that can happen?

He puts a small flaw in it that gets worse over time , then goes down a hill balls out and the front brake rotor catches on the brake pads leading to a wheel lock up and he dies.

:moon:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
He puts a small flaw in it that gets worse over time , then goes down a hill balls out and the front brake rotor catches on the brake pads leading to a wheel lock up and he dies.

:moon:

But he did save $$$$ :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i can only imagine how much time that would take up, might as well use that time instead to lube all your bearings.

Already have done that :moon:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
He puts a small flaw in it that gets worse over time , then goes down a hill balls out and the front brake rotor catches on the brake pads leading to a wheel lock up and he dies.

:moon:

Like I said I have access to all the tools needed to do this, it would just be very time consuming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be worried about a few things:

  1. The stock pattern interfering with any sort of useful wave pattern.
  2. Any machining process altering the heat treat in the rotor and making it weaker.
  3. In the end you still have a used rotor...:moon:
  4. With Patience you can get nice rotors on eBay for your bike for not a lot of money. Example: I have a Galfer Brand rear wave rotor and a Braking front rotor that I got new from eBay for $35 each.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you cut on a lathe, the entire back surface of the rotor s/b/ against the lathe faceplate/fixture, or you risk chatter marks. I learned this when i tried it.

A Blanchard-type mag. table surface grinder will do the job, but the entire rotor gets thinned out, not just the braking area.

If time is not a factor, but $ is, give it a try. Let us know how you did it,and how it turned out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
He puts a small flaw in it that gets worse over time , then goes down a hill balls out and the front brake rotor catches on the brake pads leading to a wheel lock up and he dies.

:moon:

Exactly what i was thinking:naughty:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why even bother cutting it? Just rough it up w/ a grinding disk, the rotors thin enough as it is and cutting would probably take off too much metal and then you spent all that time and you still need a rotor. Or if the rotors really that bad, then its probably better to get a new one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless you're snowbound and bored I wouldn't waste the time. All these fancy rotors kill me, they just reduce swept area, pack with mud and accelerate pad/rotor wear cause of the higher pressure per square inch needed to make the brakes work as well as they did with a stock rotor. Not to mention they heat up faster because of less mass. Regardless of that, it could be done on a milling machine with a dividing head but would probably need a mandrel made to hold it too. Not difficult but very time consuming. I'd use the time riding!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unless you're snowbound and bored I wouldn't waste the time. All these fancy rotors kill me, they just reduce swept area, pack with mud and accelerate pad/rotor wear cause of the higher pressure per square inch needed to make the brakes work as well as they did with a stock rotor. Not to mention they heat up faster because of less mass. Regardless of that, it could be done on a milling machine with a dividing head but would probably need a mandrel made to hold it too. Not difficult but very time consuming. I'd use the time riding!

Finally someone with some valid points, not just saying BS. My intent of this thread to see other peoples thoughts on this.

I am one to not leave stuff alone. I have built several custom parts for my bike (granted, I have seen much better work than I can produce by other members). I was simpling thinking of another idea to set my bike apart from others without spending a buttload of cash..........which I have already done with my recent rebuild.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...