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Any tips to help the kids build confidence on their bike?

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My son has only been riding a few months now, he is 7. He is doing very good so far but I would like to help him boost his confidence. Do any of you set up cones to weave in and out of or other things along those lines to help them improve their skills? I want him to have fun and stay interested as well as be safe and become a better rider...

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Seat time is the best thing. Let him ride as much as he can. When my son first got his 110 I did set up two cones and let him do a figure 8 just to work on braking and cornering.

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seat time is the key let him practice with other kids as often as possible also mx schools teach alot remember it is suposed to be fun.

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When my daughter started riding, I wanted her to ride the trails with me. Some of the trails had too many obstacles though, and she became discouraged. I think it is better to keep a child on easier stuff for awhile to keep it fun and they won't lose interest.

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My kids got bored riding around the yard after a while so I set up a small jump for them. They got bored after a few weeks of that and we made a bigger jump with an obstacle course. They got bored with that and now we had to go into the woods behing the house and make some trails.

I would ask them what they like doing and build something to keep them interested. My one son loved the jump and my other son liked the obstacle course. I now wonder what kind of crazy stuff I will have to build when my 2 year old starts riding.

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My kids got bored riding around the yard after a while so I set up a small jump for them. They got bored after a few weeks of that and we made a bigger jump with an obstacle course. They got bored with that and now we had to go into the woods behing the house and make some trails.

I would ask them what they like doing and build something to keep them interested. My one son loved the jump and my other son liked the obstacle course. I now wonder what kind of crazy stuff I will have to build when my 2 year old starts riding.

The first day my son had his bike, I built him a little jump, about 6 inches high, which he loved. I set him up some obstacles to go around also to practice his turning...I want to take him to watch a motorcross race soon too...

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It all happens in good time, seat time and some basic drills if turning laps on the property becomes too mundane.

As mentioned - cones to weave through, cones to stop at, figure 8's faster and faster until you have berms on your lawn.

Believe me, don't push them too much, kids go from beginner to expert way too fast anyways!!!

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Seat time, Seat time, Seat time

My son is on a kX65 now, we use cones to set up a mini track for him to ride.

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.

To help them differenciate between the front and back brakes I encouraged my young bloke to do skids at a set point.

It gave him a great feel for the back brake and he loved doing it!

I told him top use both brakes in a straight line and skid the rear in a corner.

Of course there was the occasional little high-side, but that's all part of the learning process and they made him think about leaning into the corner a bit as he hit the brake to avoid going over.

Greg

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The son has been riding in the snow for the last two days. He's been doing pretty good keeping the bike upright, had a few spills though...I've been following him around on my street tracker Suzuki GN400. I'm a little rusty though and went down pretty hard, luckily the snow was deep :moon:

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Seat time as already mentioned. Another thing is to let them know that crashing is not only normal, it's expected. Your son is a little older then when mine first started but every time he crashed it was like he thought he was going to be in trouble or something.

I also went the backyard track way... he is on a 65 now and over the last 3 or 4 years I have been slowly making it harder. Jumps, tabletops etc. Now it is becoming more and more endurocross-like... log crossings, sand pit, big culvert crossing etc. I'll be adding a rock garden and more logs next summer. He still gets bored with it but he rides it almost every day in the summer.

What size bike is your son on?

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Keep it fun. With all the (correct!) talk of seat time, remember that he doesn't have the strength or attention span for dad-length rides. Always quit while it's still fun, even if that means not accomplishing your original goal(s) for the day.

S

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Seat time as already mentioned. Another thing is to let them know that crashing is not only normal, it's expected. Your son is a little older then when mine first started but every time he crashed it was like he thought he was going to be in trouble or something.

I also went the backyard track way... he is on a 65 now and over the last 3 or 4 years I have been slowly making it harder. Jumps, tabletops etc. Now it is becoming more and more endurocross-like... log crossings, sand pit, big culvert crossing etc. I'll be adding a rock garden and more logs next summer. He still gets bored with it but he rides it almost every day in the summer.

What size bike is your son on?

Good point. Crashing is part of learning. Let it be OK, just part of being on the bike and pushing the limits a little. Make sure he/she's wearing full gear.:moon:

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Keep it fun.

Good advice. I would also let my son pick what we were going to ride next after taking a break at the truck etc. If he didn't know I'd suggest a loop or play on some hills or whatever. This keeps them engaged and not just 'following Dad' all day (although I almost always lead for safety reasons).

With all the (correct!) talk of seat time, remember that he doesn't have the strength or attention span for dad-length rides.

Yes, distance is something you have to work up to. I would always loop back to the truck after a few miles, asked if he wanted a snack etc. After a while I noticed he wouldn't even take his helmet off... just waiting for me so we could get back to riding :moon: That's when we started riding longer and longer loops. Today he is 10 and on a 65 and we will routinely ride up to about 45 mile loops (the distance his bike and spare fuel bottle will take us). I can't even ride that mileage with some of the adults I ride with :cheers:

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I often wondered how far a 65 would go on a tank of gas. I feel really comfortable with the 18 mile loop we normally run now.

Keep it fun. With all the (correct!) talk of seat time, remember that he doesn't have the strength or attention span for dad-length rides. Always quit while it's still fun, even if that means not accomplishing your original goal(s) for the day.
Oh yeah. We (daughter, her mom and I) traded three bikes back and forth over several miles, since she can't ride the bigger bikes, that meant she spent a lot of time walking while mom and I played musical bikes to get through the trail. I was planning to quit while I was ahead, ride back, load a bike and trailer the three bikes at a convenient spot. I didn't and paid for a ticket on the shoe leather express.

It also helps to have your kid follow other kids of a slightly better skill level around, they learn a lot by emulating other kids.

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