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Best way to winterize bike?

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I will be away for Military duties for 3-6 months. I have a 2008 Suzuki rmz250. It is kept in my un-heated garage and it gets cold here in Connecticut. I just recently finally got the carb tuned perfectly and would hate to have to tear it all apart again due to a gummed up carburetor.

What is the best way to winterize this? Just drain all the gas out of the fuel bowl and tank? Keep the gas in and add stabilizer?

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I have been trying to find the best way to winterize my dirtbike. But i keep getting diffent methods. I have an 04' and an 06' yz250f.

I have been told to run stabalizer in the fuel and then run the bike dry. Or to top off the tank, fill it with stabalizer and dont do anything else but start it ocasionally through the winter. I have been told to take out the bottom part of the carb and clean that.

So what is the best way to winterize a dirtbike??? thanks.

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stud the tires and ride through the winter on the ice.....but seriously, I drain the tank and ensure I run the carb dry.

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You are probably best off draining everything. As long as your carb is working correctly and it's dry, it should start right up after sitting for 2-4 months.

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Drain the carb and the tank. I think the ethenol in the gas makes the float valve gum up. I've had mine stick shut without draining the carb for just 6weeks of sitting. Oh and when you start it up in the spring, slow kick it a couple of times before starting, this will allow the oil to lube the engine so it doesn't start dry. You could also push it in fifth gear for a bit. Then start it, and feel your butt pucker.:p

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I've always just drained the carb and tank and left it at that until spring. Never had a problem in many years of doing so to multiple bikes each year.

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haha i would love to ride in the winter :p But i have snowboarding to do! Idaho has some AMAZING ski resorts and amazing pow. 4 resorts within 2 1/2 hours from my house at MOST.

But thanks for the great responses. With nothing to do tomorrow besides stuff my face full of turkey ill get working on the bikes. Thanks again TT!

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its only a matter of time before that god forsaken snow hits! So ive put together a quick basic thread of how to winterize your bike, these are general guidelines of what to do, refer to your owners manual for any questions about your bike🤣

first off its always a good idea to wash your bike when working on it, it can make the job alot easier and worth while, especially if your putting it away for a period of time.

take off the spark plug and put about a cap-full of motor oil down the cylinder. Slowly turn the engine over so the oil coats the cylinder walls and protects them from corroding. Then put a fresh plug back in the bike.

if there are any broken parts, or worn out parts on your bike, replace them before putting the bike away.

Once you wash the bike and fix any broken parts you can either drain the gas tank, You could also add sta-bil or other fuel stabilizers. That way the gas won’t go bad. Once you put the stabilizer in the tank, turn the gas on and start the bike so that it will get down in the carburetor. Then shut the gas off and run the bike until it dies so the carb is dry. This helps prevent the carburetor from getting dirty and running poorly in the spring.

Last but not least, put your bike on a stand that keeps both wheels off the ground, if possible. This will relieve the bike and suspension, making it last longer. Putting a tarp or blanket over the bike keeps it safe from the elements, such as dust/dirt and water.

hope this helps guys, like i said these are general guidelines, if i forgot anything post it here, good luck guys :) time to break out the snowmobiles!

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just wanted some tips on storing my bike for the winter its a 98 cr250r never had a bike during the winter so some tips would be great. should I drain my gas from the carb and the tank? and what about the coolant? not sure if dirt bike stuff is different from car looks like green coolant in there to me. thank you guys!

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I add fuel stabilizer to my last tank and run it a bit, then I drain tank & carb then remove spark plug and give a quick mist of fogging oil and kick it over a few times although the fogging oil isn't nessisary I do it to every thing I store over the winter for piece of mind

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Damn! I don't put my bike away till November, and you're way down there in Michigan.

 

I just put stabil in it, run it for a while, then change the oil.

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I put Stbil in a full tank, run for a short bit, drain the carb. I try to start it a couple times during the winter and just drain the carb again each time. 

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Save money and remove the gas. No need for an additive. Drain the carb too. Change the oil. Put the bike on a stand with wheels off the ground.

 

 

Don't run the bike unless you actually plan to ride it. Just warming the bike up will not get it hot enough to burn off the condensation, causing corrosion and pitting.

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Fortunately, we don't have that problem around here. Definitely drain the gas from the carb and you might as well drain the tank if you don't plan to use the gas anytime soon - especially if it's pump gas. Clean the bike up and it's a good time to get caught up on all of those maintenance chores. Pull the swing arm, clean, and grease the swing arm bearings. Also do the linkage bearings. Depending on how long it's been since the last time it was done and if you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, you may want to get the rear shock serviced (change oil, seals, and re-charged with nitrogen). Clean out your forks; replace the bushings, seals, and new oil. While you have your forks off, you might as well pull the triple clamps, clean and repack the bearings for the steering stem. Clean and re-oil the air filter; clean out the air box before re-installing. Change your engine oil. Once you have everything back together, be sure to clean and oil your chain. Check the wheel spokes for looseness. Lastly, if it needs it, you may want to repack your silencer. If you do all of this as soon as possible, you won't have to worry about it later. When spring comes, pull out your bike, gas it up, and go.

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I add fuel stabilizer to my last tank and run it a bit, then I drain tank & carb then remove spark plug and give a quick mist of fogging oil and kick it over a few times although the fogging oil isn't nessisary I do it to every thing I store over the winter for piece of mind

I do it the same way and spray the fogger in the spark plug hole every time.  Just a hint for guys that live on cold climates and use Amsoil.  Great oil but known to not have the same rust preventatives as most oils.  On these bikes, I'd do the fogger down the carb with it running to get ALL the internals, main's etc.   Spray the fogger until it dies.   It helps prevent rust from the condensation you get in cold climates.

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Fortunately, we don't have that problem around here. Definitely drain the gas from the carb and you might as well drain the tank if you don't plan to use the gas anytime soon - especially if it's pump gas. Clean the bike up and it's a good time to get caught up on all of those maintenance chores. Pull the swing arm, clean, and grease the swing arm bearings. Also do the linkage bearings. Depending on how long it's been since the last time it was done and if you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, you may want to get the rear shock serviced (change oil, seals, and re-charged with nitrogen). Clean out your forks; replace the bushings, seals, and new oil. While you have your forks off, you might as well pull the triple clamps, clean and repack the bearings for the steering stem. Clean and re-oil the air filter; clean out the air box before re-installing. Change your engine oil. Once you have everything back together, be sure to clean and oil your chain. Check the wheel spokes for looseness. Lastly, if it needs it, you may want to repack your silencer. If you do all of this as soon as possible, you won't have to worry about it later. When spring comes, pull out your bike, gas it up, and go.

 

 

This^^^ is the best bet. For the couple months a year I can't ride here the bike gets torn down to the frame and everything gone through.

Makes for easy maintenance during riding season and a fresh new bike every spring.

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