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How are these enduro bikes I see wired?

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You know, the ones who's lights only work when they kick them over. I've got a 92 klr250 and I want to eliminate the battery to save some weight. Do these enduro bikes use a capacitor or are they just wired differently? I guess they only have running lights and a computer, so the power demands are a little different. Anyone know?

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I was in a similar situation with my 1991 Honda xr250L, I wanted to eliminate the battery to save some weight. What I found is that if you replace the battery with a capacitor everything will still work when the bike is running. I used either a 47uf capacitor or a 47000uf capacitor (Sorry I cant remember which one, i'm sure someone will know), but i do not know if that would change with your bike. The only downside is that the bike wont start on the first kick anymore, you have to kick it a few times to charge up the capacitor, other than that I felt it was a good modification.

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So would you say those enduro bikes use a cap? Would it be possible to set up the charging system to regulate current so I didn't blow out lights and things without one?

I know from taking a circuits class that there has to be a way to calculate the correct size capacitor but we didn't get into design problems like that.

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I bet it was the bigger cap.

The stator generates AC at voltages far higher than the standard 12V, so you'll need *at least* a voltage regulator (keeps the voltage at around 12V, assuming you chose the right one) in the circuit. Many bikes have them already.

Depending on what you want to run (LED lighting can be particular, some of it running on DC only) you *may* need a rectifier (turns AC into DC. sorta.) in the circuit. Again, some bikes may have one from the factory.

Radio Shack sells a cheap rectifier. Voltage regulators can be adapted from other bikes or you can get them from Baja Designs or Ricky Stator.

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I have a DR350S, dual sport. It has a lighting stator and the stock version comes with a battery. I removed the battery and replaced it with a 33,000 microfarad capacitor. It works great and starts easily if the carb is working properly. The dirt only version (DR350) does not have a battery and the stator has doesn't have the full complement of lighting coils. Basically the dirt only versions have a minimal electrical system, just enough for the CDI and a couple of lights. There's no capacitor that I can see.

I've enjoyed the days without a battery (lower maintenance), but I'm in the middle of fuel injection conversion, so the battery will be back:cry:.

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How about something that weighs about a pound, costs about $10 plus shipping, and should drop right into the existing battery location w/no mods (other than securing and the obvious electrical connections) needed?

http://www.apexbattery.com/yuasa-np1-2-12-battery-sealed-lead-acid-batteries-yuasa-batteries.html

Maybe it sounds like a 'halfway solution', but without seeing a wiring diagram and voltage/current/waveform info for your bike it seems like the safest bet.

Ray

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I have a DR350S, dual sport. It has a lighting stator and the stock version comes with a battery. I removed the battery and replaced it with a 33,000 microfarad capacitor. It works great and starts easily if the carb is working properly. The dirt only version (DR350) does not have a battery and the stator has doesn't have the full complement of lighting coils. Basically the dirt only versions have a minimal electrical system, just enough for the CDI and a couple of lights. There's no capacitor that I can see.

I've enjoyed the days without a battery (lower maintenance), but I'm in the middle of fuel injection conversion, so the battery will be back:cry:.

Im trying to change all of the wiring on my drz250 to the dirt versions wiring(kickstart,killswitch,no extras.). Do you know if the CDI is the same on both models?

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Im trying to change all of the wiring on my drz250 to the dirt versions wiring(kickstart,killswitch,no extras.). Do you know if the CDI is the same on both models?

I don't know about the DRZ, but the DR dirt/dual sport CDIs are very similar. The dirt model is missing a connector for kick stand etc., I believe, but I think people have made them work both ways.

Get the manual and check the wiring diagram to be sure. If you have trouble with it, point me to the wiring diagram and I can help sort it out. I tend to think they are more or less the same, there's little reason for Suzuki to use significantly different designs.

Why change CDIs? Why not just pull of the stuff you don't need, e.g. lights, battery, defeat kickstand/neutral interlocks etc.

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Thats the plan. I just want to know that its possible to do with the dual sport CDI. I live in asia and dont have a manual and dont feel like spending $60+shipping on a book version of it. The CDI has a wiring harness that comes out of the stator/pickup coil. one more harness goes out to the hundred other funtions of this bike. I want to start fresh from these 5 wires and wire up the most simple system I can. I will run a 12v regulator for a headlight/ taillight . Other than that there will just be wiring to the Ignition coil and to a kill switch.

Ive never done anything like this so I just wanted as much advice before I do it as possible. Im basing everything on an old XR250 wiring diagram I found online(http://zorch.maow.myip.org/bikes/wiring/XR250R_XR500R_1981.jpg) and figure it should work . I was just hoping someone on here could say "yeh ,no problem" or "oh ,don't do that or you'll fry your CDI"

Thanks for the help, Nick

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Lot's of complicated stuff here.

First, it's called an AC headlight. That's why it only lights up when the engine is running. Many off road bikes have an AC headlight. My XR600 came that way.

I see two issues. The first is legal. My state requires that a street licensed bike can run the tail light for 15 (20?) minutes. That's why there is a battery. The second is you CDI. Is your bike a magneto system like my XR600 or does the CDI run on 12 volts?

After 5 minutes of looking it appears that your bike uses a magneto style ignition. The lighting has nothing to do with the ignition. You can remove your battery and replace it with a capacitor. Without a battery your turn signals will likely not work at idle. Your horn will likewise not work like it did before. Those both need a lot of power to function correctly and that power is not available at idle.

One thing. The bike is a KLR250. It's not exactly a high performance motocross bike. The small weight of the battery will really not make that much of a difference. Properly functioning lights might just keep you from getting run over of the road.

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Lot's of complicated stuff here.

First, it's called an AC headlight. That's why it only lights up when the engine is running. Many off road bikes have an AC headlight. My XR600 came that way.

I see two issues. The first is legal. My state requires that a street licensed bike can run the tail light for 15 (20?) minutes. That's why there is a battery. The second is you CDI. Is your bike a magneto system like my XR600 or does the CDI run on 12 volts?

After 5 minutes of looking it appears that your bike uses a magneto style ignition. The lighting has nothing to do with the ignition. You can remove your battery and replace it with a capacitor. Without a battery your turn signals will likely not work at idle. Your horn will likewise not work like it did before. Those both need a lot of power to function correctly and that power is not available at idle.

One thing. The bike is a KLR250. It's not exactly a high performance motocross bike. The small weight of the battery will really not make that much of a difference. Properly functioning lights might just keep you from getting run over of the road.

LOL. Yes I realize this. But since it is far from high performance, I'm looking for any way to get free power. The battery's only a pound or so, so I guess I'll just leave it. I didn't know about a/c headlights though, cool!

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