What job should I have? Whats your job?

Well its time to sighn up for some new classes at high school. They make it seem like you got to already got to know your job when your older and everything. What are some of the careers you have and how much do you make? I just dont know what I want to be when I get older but I would like to make at least $65,000 a year after about 10 years on the job. I dont want to sit at a desk all day and I will probably go to college. I like to be around kids(any age), do athletic stuff. Was thinking about about a P.E. or parole officer but they dont get paid enough. Maybe a physcial therpist but it sound hard to get into. Anybody got any ideas? Whats your job because I dont know of a lot of jobs and how much do you get paid. Thanks guys

well, especially now there is no gaurantee for salary, you'll need to figure out what kind of job is bearable, enjoyable and something you can do with your unique talent. First thing is to know whether you like to work with your hands or your head. I'm a hands person, I like being on my feet and moving, being at a desk drives me nuts.

It was important to me when I graduated high school that I be self employed. Even more so that I do exactly what I wanted to do every moment even if I didnt have money. This thinking led me to have some of the most memorable times in my life. I drove the USA east and west following the greatful dead and rainbow gatherings. (I know dont laugh too hard) For me it was about my freedom. I had worked at Burger king, Mcshit, hardware store, k-mart, and as a roofer. None of these were my thing. Along the way while I was traveling (without money for much of it) I picked up some hemp twine and beads at a beadstore and started making macrame necklaces and selling them at gas stations for gas, waffle houses for food, and eventually setting up on college campus to earn some cash. I always had inspiring people around me and felt like part of a family as I made my way in life for the next couple years. The jewelry I made evolved naturally and we thought it to be some of the best we had seen in its class. I started using stones and silver and gold some years ago and decided to take another leap to find people overseas to help produce it. We now have many employees in Bali that produce our designs as well as I spend 2 months of each year in there soaking up sun and culture. Just yesterday we launched our new website (which is still not finished) and continue to dream large. http://www.graceanchor.com

My advice to you is... Dont pressure yourself to know your future, your future job, or even what tomorrow may hold. Do exactly what excites you in your present day situation. Follow those thoughts in your head that may not even seem realistic. Share who you are with as many people who will listen and opportunities will find you.

Happy Journeys to you !

My mother burned this into our brains from a very young age, "I don't care if you become a doctor, lawyer, or garbage man. Figure out what you love to do and you will have a full life."

I know this sounds silly but don't worry about the money right now. Find your passion and figure out how to get paid for it.

I think it is very difficult for today's youth to find their passion. Parents are not helping things either. Expectations are set way too high and around status rather than purposeful living.

I'll say this, there is truth to what stephenclement says above. Get out there and start figuring out what you don't like. The journey in trying things is as important as the destination.

Good luck!

Listen to the others. You don't have to know what you want to be when you grow up.

I hated school from day 1 in kindergarten through June 9, 1971.

Late June in 1971 I got a job mopping floors at the local small hospital making $2.22 an hour and loved it. I learned so much from being around Docs and Nurses and Techs. I asked so many questions I probably drove them all nuts!

One day the head of the Surgery Dept asked if I'd like to work in Surgery. I asked, "doing what?", as I was very squeemish.

Cleaning instrument sets, cleaning the rooms after procedures, transporting patients etc.

Small hospital, so as I learned more and more I was offered more and more. Helping prep patients, holding up legs being prepped (Dr Mark can tell you that you need to build strength and stamina for that!), and I even began to work as a scrub tech, which is the person that hands the surgeon and assistant instruments and pulls on retractors etc.

One thing though I had to figure out...why, when the anesthesiologist pushes the plunger on the syringe of pentethol does the patient immediately go to sleep.

I took a college chemistry class (high school cumm GPA 0.7) and got what call the JAZZ!! I finished that college chemistry class with an 'A'.

I had to do something in the medical field so at 25 years of age I went to college full time majoring in biochemistry at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Never ever regreted my choice to mop floors.

I now work in the area of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology and make enough money to live on. I raised 4 kids and have been blessed with 3 grandkids so far.

So again, listen to the others because they know that of which they speak!

:ride:

I loved being a computer programmer from 1974 until about 4 years ago.

I would not recommend that path any more.

If I could go back and do it again, I would get an undergraduate degree in a technical field, engineering, computer science, etc. and then get a law degree and specialize in IP (Intellectual Property).

Also consider what area you want to live in. If you want to be a brain surgeon then you will need to live in a large city. Small towns and rural areas are out.

65K might sound like a lot of money, but not if you live in San Francisco or San Jose, where a fixer home is 400K.

Listen to the others. You don't have to know what you want to be when you grow up.

I hated school from day 1 in kindergarten through June 9, 1971.

Late June in 1971 I got a job mopping floors at the local small hospital making $2.22 an hour and loved it. I learned so much from being around Docs and Nurses and Techs. I asked so many questions I probably drove them all nuts!

One day the head of the Surgery Dept asked if I'd like to work in Surgery. I asked, "doing what?", as I was very squeemish.

Cleaning instrument sets, cleaning the rooms after procedures, transporting patients etc.

Small hospital, so as I learned more and more I was offered more and more. Helping prep patients, holding up legs being prepped (Dr Mark can tell you that you need to build strength and stamina for that!), and I even began to work as a scrub tech, which is the person that hands the surgeon and assistant instruments and pulls on retractors etc.

One thing though I had to figure out...why, when the anesthesiologist pushes the plunger on the syringe of pentethol does the patient immediately go to sleep.

I took a college chemistry class (high school cumm GPA 0.7) and got what call the JAZZ!! I finished that college chemistry class with an 'A'.

I had to do something in the medical field so at 25 years of age I went to college full time majoring in biochemistry at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Never ever regreted my choice to mop floors.

I now work in the area of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology and make enough money to live on. I raised 4 kids and have been blessed with 3 grandkids so far.

So again, listen to the others because they know that of which they speak!

:lol:

What an awesome story. This is the kind of stuff that makes America great. This could not have happened in many other countries.

Thanks for sharing! :ride:

Some peple say "it doesnt matter what you do, only matters if you are the best at it". It didnt work for me like that.

I took Bachelors degree in Business (at Boston, MA) and wanted to succeed in Finance. Then i did an MBA and started working for a reputable investment bank. After two years I realized that it wasnt my kind of life. I discovered MX at 27 and knew I didnt need too much money for the kind of life I wanted. I decided I didnt want to have any children so I didnt had to work hard to give them the best I could. I inherited a flat which I rented and had enough money for myself for the rest of my life. Not too much but enough to live a decent life with no children. I learned that time and health are two things that money cant buy. So I'm almost 33 and do nothing but MX. But I want to start a small business that keeps me a little more occupied, i'm a little bored now

good luck and hope this helps

Listen to the others. You don't have to know what you want to be when you grow up.

I hated school from day 1 in kindergarten through June 9, 1971.

Late June in 1971 I got a job mopping floors at the local small hospital making $2.22 an hour and loved it. I learned so much from being around Docs and Nurses and Techs. I asked so many questions I probably drove them all nuts!

One day the head of the Surgery Dept asked if I'd like to work in Surgery. I asked, "doing what?", as I was very squeemish.

Cleaning instrument sets, cleaning the rooms after procedures, transporting patients etc.

Small hospital, so as I learned more and more I was offered more and more. Helping prep patients, holding up legs being prepped (Dr Mark can tell you that you need to build strength and stamina for that!), and I even began to work as a scrub tech, which is the person that hands the surgeon and assistant instruments and pulls on retractors etc.

One thing though I had to figure out...why, when the anesthesiologist pushes the plunger on the syringe of pentethol does the patient immediately go to sleep.

I took a college chemistry class (high school cumm GPA 0.7) and got what call the JAZZ!! I finished that college chemistry class with an 'A'.

I had to do something in the medical field so at 25 years of age I went to college full time majoring in biochemistry at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Never ever regreted my choice to mop floors.

I now work in the area of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology and make enough money to live on. I raised 4 kids and have been blessed with 3 grandkids so far.

So again, listen to the others because they know that of which they speak!

:ride:

I agree, great story and example of making the best of what you've got. Shows how much your attitude and thinking makes things happen.

When my daughter and I were touring universities, at UCSD a parent at asked the provost if her son would be able to get a job after graduation.

The provost explained to not confuse a student's major with their occupation.

He explained that not too many years ago thee students graduated for UCSD, John Muir college with a degree in physics.

One went to medical school and became a doctor.

One got a PhD in physics and came back to UCSD to teach physics.

The other was Mike Judge. I am sure you are familiar with his work.

I am a computer programmer, Cal Poly SLO drop out. The sharpest programmer I ever met has degrees in English Literature and Industrial Engineering.

Let me start by saying that I am only 32. I was raised by two hard working parents. Unfortunately my parents were hard working, but didn’t make very much money because they weren’t what I would consider smart workers or self promoters. They were always the very productive and very committed worker that would often get passed up by the worker that asked for promotion.

I barley graduated High School, and for over ten years I have been making more than what your ten years goal is. I have had a number of jobs since I was 16 and the two common trends I have had through all of my jobs has been to learn as much as I could and that I busted my butt to be better than everyone around me. I also always let my bosses know I was always looking to learn more and do more. These work ethics opened door after door.

So, let me answer your questions.

I am currently running my business as a Design and Manufacturing consultant. I also recently started a small off road parts manufacturing company that is doing quit well. I comfortably make more then what you said you would like to make, but I am sure I make far less than Dr. Mark. I make enough to comfortably provide for me, my wife, my two year old daughter, and my garage full of toys. I probably don’t squirrel enough away for retirement, but my daughters college will be taken care of.

If I were to pass on some advice here it is…

*I think most people should work retail at some point in their lives. Working retail forces you to learn decent communication and how to communicate with a wide variety people.

*Figure out why people are successful. And why businesses are successful. There is a LOT of lesions to learn at McDonalds, or even the corner Bicycle Shop.

*Stay in School while you are figuring out exactly what you want to do, even if you can only do School part time.

*Work you butt off, and always try to learn more about your trade or craft. Take on new responsibilities and let your boss know you want to learn more and grow with the business.

*Learn how to communicate well. Generally the better communication you have the better you will do in most careers. This is something I have always struggled with, but I clearly see more opportunities open the better I become with both written and verbal communications.

*Know your value to the company you work for. Always make sure you produce more for the company you work for then what you earn.

*No matter how much you love the type of work you do, it will always become a job. Figure out what will truly satisfy you. For me that is learning new things, and solving problems. You will have a hard time figuring this out without getting into some jobs.

*Last thing to live by is to do business ethically, and try to burn as few bridges as possible. I can’t tell you how many times opportunities have opened for me from jobs I had previously because someone remembered me for being a hard working, smart and ethical person.

It is nice to see a kid asking these questions. If you are interested in being a Physical Therapist then make a goal to go to five offices and tell them you are interested in the trade and would like to learn more about it. Ask if you can sweep their floors and take out their garbage for a week in exchange for being around the job and being able to ask questions about the career.

Good Luck.

Become a fireman. They have all kinds of free time.

Let me start by saying that I am only 32. I was raised by two hard working parents. Unfortunately my parents were hard working, but didn’t make very much money because they weren’t what I would consider smart workers or self promoters. They were always the very productive and very committed worker that would often get passed up by the worker that asked for promotion.

I barley graduated High School, and for over ten years I have been making more than what your ten years goal is. I have had a number of jobs since I was 16 and the two common trends I have had through all of my jobs has been to learn as much as I could and that I busted my butt to be better than everyone around me. I also always let my bosses know I was always looking to learn more and do more. These work ethics opened door after door.

So, let me answer your questions.

I am currently running my business as a Design and Manufacturing consultant. I also recently started a small off road parts manufacturing company that is doing quit well. I comfortably make more then what you said you would like to make, but I am sure I make far less than Dr. Mark. I make enough to comfortably provide for me, my wife, my two year old daughter, and my garage full of toys. I probably don’t squirrel enough away for retirement, but my daughters college will be taken care of.

If I were to pass on some advice here it is…

*I think most people should work retail at some point in their lives. Working retail forces you to learn decent communication and how to communicate with a wide variety people.

*Figure out why people are successful. And why businesses are successful. There is a LOT of lesions to learn at McDonalds, or even the corner Bicycle Shop.

*Stay in School while you are figuring out exactly what you want to do, even if you can only do School part time.

*Work you butt off, and always try to learn more about your trade or craft. Take on new responsibilities and let your boss know you want to learn more and grow with the business.

*Learn how to communicate well. Generally the better communication you have the better you will do in most careers. This is something I have always struggled with, but I clearly see more opportunities open the better I become with both written and verbal communications.

*Know your value to the company you work for. Always make sure you produce more for the company you work for then what you earn.

*No matter how much you love the type of work you do, it will always become a job. Figure out what will truly satisfy you. For me that is learning new things, and solving problems. You will have a hard time figuring this out without getting into some jobs.

*Last thing to live by is to do business ethically, and try to burn as few bridges as possible. I can’t tell you how many times opportunities have opened for me from jobs I had previously because someone remembered me for being a hard working, smart and ethical person.

It is nice to see a kid asking these questions. If you are interested in being a Physical Therapist then make a goal to go to five offices and tell them you are interested in the trade and would like to learn more about it. Ask if you can sweep their floors and take out their garbage for a week in exchange for being around the job and being able to ask questions about the career.

Good Luck.

bigtim, thats a great post!

if i may, i'd like to add to your tips.

- when it comes to knowing your value within an organization; i think, at first (if you've negotiated a good salary) you may be getting the better end of the deal. as time goes on, the relationship becomes equitable, meaning your pay is commensurate with your knowledge, work level and the dollars that you bring in. unfortunately, many people stay in a position too long and your company is getting more out of you than they are willing to pay; this is happening alot in today's job market due to the economy. at that point, it might be time to move on to a company that will offer more growth; you probably won't get more money initially, but when things turn around, you'll be better off.

- while making a living doing something you've been pationate about as a hobby works for alot of people; i've found that you can become just as passionate about a career that you are really good at, that may have not been your first choice. being a master of your trade, no matter what it is makes it really easy to get up in the morning to do.

bigtim, didn't mean to hijack your post. i personally thought it's one of the best one's i've read here in a while, and agree 100% with your story.

WOW lots of tips thanks guys.

Become a fireman. They have all kinds of free time.

My dads a firefighter. Im just scared of the danger and cancer.

I though I'd put in my 2 cents.

I was the same as you. By 25 I wanted to have my own house, be graduated school, and be married. That was the plans.

I was worried about how much money I would make. I've gone through Culinary Arts, Web Design and Development, and Graphic Design at University. All these things are courses I took because friends and family talked me into it. I could make money. MONEY $$$$.

I'm 24 now.... and I have met none of those goals. But I'm ok with that now.

I realized you have to learn things. You have to have life experience. Stuff isn't as shiny as you think it might be.

I'm now back in school doing upgrading because I want to work in either Horticulture or Forestry. That's what I wanted to do originally when I was 18.

It took me a few years, but I'm on the right path now.

My advice. Do what you love, or do what you're good at. Either way you'll be happy and will get paid for it

My advice is to work hard, go to college for something, even though you are not 100% sure what field you want to be in. I went to college, changed my major, graduated, worked in the field for 7 years and hated it all.

Now I do something else entirely, but college and my job gave me plenty of skills along the way. (that I didn't have before and I use now in my own business)

You'll see things in those years that you like or dislike and you'll learn along the way what you want to be a part of.

Tough to have it all figured out before you try it!

My dads a firefighter. Im just scared of the danger and cancer.

You're scared and you ride a motorcycle?:ride:

It only causes cancer in California, duh.:lol:

It's hard to know what you wanna be when you're in high school. I changed majors 3 times in college and finally dropped out. Now, I work in Energy and make plenty. If you have the courage to be a firefighter, you can have your free time to ride and get an education down the road when you figure out if you want to do something else...or get into Energy, it's awesome!:ride:

If you go to college, pick something with computers (programming, IT, etc.). Your options are much better, IMO.

I dont remember if I said go to school.

If I missed it... Go to school while you are figuring out what to do. Work while you are going to school and learn from everything you do. And, ask yourself what you are doing to better the company you are working for.

Whatever you do, bust your ass at it. We have too many Americans that are ok with filling space. Those are the people who hate their jobs. And, to think about it... I hate everything I suck at.

bigtim, thats a great post!

if i may, i'd like to add to your tips.

- when it comes to knowing your value within an organization; i think, at first (if you've negotiated a good salary) you may be getting the better end of the deal. as time goes on, the relationship becomes equitable, meaning your pay is commensurate with your knowledge, work level and the dollars that you bring in. unfortunately, many people stay in a position too long and your company is getting more out of you than they are willing to pay; this is happening alot in today's job market due to the economy. at that point, it might be time to move on to a company that will offer more growth; you probably won't get more money initially, but when things turn around, you'll be better off.

- while making a living doing something you've been pationate about as a hobby works for alot of people; i've found that you can become just as passionate about a career that you are really good at, that may have not been your first choice. being a master of your trade, no matter what it is makes it really easy to get up in the morning to do.

bigtim, didn't mean to hijack your post. i personally thought it's one of the best one's i've read here in a while, and agree 100% with your story.

Thanks for the nice compliment. I just got excited to see a kid actually show interest in their future. I didnt feel like anything was hijacked. I agree with everything you said. I have made a good living working in the industries that I choose as my "hobby". Its almost like pissing in your sandbox. :ride:

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