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XR650R RPMs

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Ive got a 2000 XR650R with stock 14/48 gearing.. uncorked/jetted... I have it tagged and curious about running some slab.. Wheels are stock size... can I run this bike at 60 mph for extended periods? (10-50 miles)what is a good RPM to shoot for on runs like this? I have a 15cs I could put on but, hate to loose any of the torque. As it is now my Vapor reads 5600/5800 @ 60mph I think but, not sure on this.. what a sweet ass bike.. just dont want to trash it... thanks all..

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You can run 60 w/stock gearing all day long, but I run 15/45 on the street to make it more relaxed/fewer rpm. 14/48 is great in the desert, I'll go 13/48 for tight singletrack which allows for more use of 2nd/3rd gear.

Peter

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I'll run 70 on the desert roads for 10-20 miles at a time,it dosn't feel like it's over reving at all with stock gearing 14\48. But i did ride a 650r with a 15\48 and it was more relaxing at that speed,but was a bit slower getting there.

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You're not going to hurt it

thats what i was going to say. i find myself on 10mi runs of slab more and more often nowdays. i'm gonna throw a 45 on there now just to keep the revs down just a little, maybe increase the mpg while i'm at it, but probably not enough to notice it since i get a thrill from the acceleration from these things. i've got a 2000 also.

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There was a mention of losing a little torque by going to the 15t front sprocket. I don't experience that, I only run the 14t for really tight technical stuff. The 15/48 is my favorite gearing for most riding/exploring in AZ

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My calculations show a 650R spinning just over 4700rpm at 60mph with 14/48 gearing and an 84.8" rear tire circumference. That's not going to hurt anything.

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Interesting thread this.

I have just aquired a barely used (under 600Klms) 2002 Australian import running 15/41 gearing which is WAY too high for the offroading I'll be doing. It's uncorked/jetted. No tach so not sure exactly what RPM's are but feels quite relaxed at 70MPH according to GPS. I'm sticking on a rear 48 (and new chain) tomorrow to start with and can obviously come down on the gearbox sprocket size if need be. I guess it's going to feel quite different to ride!

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Interesting thread this.

I have just aquired a barely used (under 600Klms) 2002 Australian import running 15/41 gearing which is WAY too high for the offroading I'll be doing. It's uncorked/jetted. No tach so not sure exactly what RPM's are but feels quite relaxed at 70MPH according to GPS. I'm sticking on a rear 48 (and new chain) tomorrow to start with and can obviously come down on the gearbox sprocket size if need be. I guess it's going to feel quite different to ride!

Yes, Aussie-spec bikes were quite different from the off-road only bikes in the US. Street-legal off the floor and had a stator that could support the bigger lighting.

My DS'ed R came with 15/45. After reading a lot here, I just put 15/47 on it, and I like it a lot better for trails, and it's only a little buzzier on the slab.

The 48 will definitely add to your fun in the dirt! :ride:

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The great thing about the XR is the quick and easy front sprocket changing, makes it very easy to try 13-14-15/48 and see which is closest to your needs. Front sprockets are cheap and easy to carry. Once you're in the ballpark you may choose a different rear to fine tune. You can easily change the front sprockets mid ride if you go from the highway to the desert to the tight singletrack.

Peter

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The great thing about the XR is the quick and easy front sprocket changing, makes it very easy to try 13-14-15/48 and see which is closest to your needs. Front sprockets are cheap and easy to carry. Once you're in the ballpark you may choose a different rear to fine tune. You can easily change the front sprockets mid ride if you go from the highway to the desert to the tight singletrack.

Peter

is what I was thinking also.. Ive got the Iron Man 15cs... we are getting ready to have some shit weather here but ASAP Ill run the stock, change to the 15 and post both RPMs. Thought about going with maybe a 47 rs but, kind of a pain if 1 tooth doesnt make a real change in RPMs, just hate loosing 3 at one go.. (15)cs... good thread... nice to have others input.. :ride:

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The great thing about the XR is the quick and easy front sprocket changing, makes it very easy to try 13-14-15/48 and see which is closest to your needs. Front sprockets are cheap and easy to carry. Once you're in the ballpark you may choose a different rear to fine tune. You can easily change the front sprockets mid ride if you go from the highway to the desert to the tight singletrack.

Peter

my buddy has been looking for a 13 tooth front sprocket for his 650r and the local shopps can't seem to find any.

where did you get your 13 tooth front sprocket???

biwwy

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15/47 for what I ride is great. Good combination!:ride:

If it is really tight, like a National H&H, I will drop to a 14 front.

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Front sprockets are cheap and easy to carry.
And, if you're attacked by ninjas, they make good throwing stars.

Hai-Yah!

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And, if you're attacked by ninjas, they make good throwing stars.

Hai-Yah!

:lol:

Rear sprockets are more intimidating to ninjas, but harder to change on the trail. :ride:

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OK so I've just got the 48T rear sprocket and new chain fitted ready for a ride tomorrow. Only thing that doesn't 'look right' is the chain is now making much harder contact with the slider mounted underneath the swingarm just forward of the rear sprocket. I'm wondering if the Australian spec bikes with the 15/41 gearing used a different size chain slider than the bikes with OE 14/48 gearing.

The chain slides over it easy enough, just that the run between the two sprockets is not as straight as before due to the much larger RS. Is this anything to worry about?

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OK so I've just got the 48T rear sprocket and new chain fitted ready for a ride tomorrow. Only thing that doesn't 'look right' is the chain is now making much harder contact with the slider mounted underneath the swingarm just forward of the rear sprocket. I'm wondering if the Australian spec bikes with the 15/41 gearing used a different size chain slider than the bikes with OE 14/48 gearing.

The chain slides over it easy enough, just that the run between the two sprockets is not as straight as before due to the much larger RS. Is this anything to worry about?

Nah i am sure they would use the same part and i reckon itll be fine anyway, can i ask though with the 15/41 combo which was standard for Australia, how did it slide over the chain slider? Because im currently have 15/45 and have been thinking later on down the track to change it back to the standard 15/41 instead of the previous owners 15/45. Also what was it like cruising at 100-100km/h?

Thanks

Matt.

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I use 15/40 gearing on my XR650R(super motarded w/17" wheels and it is geared perfect for road use. It'll run 80 mph all day with my big 6'5" ass on it, and out-corners most sportbikes.

I keep my stock rims with knobbies, extra chain, 14t counter sprocket and 48t rear sprocket if I want to go dirt riding. Works for me!

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