Tubliss set up for Dual Sport

I did a search and found lots of info at TT on the Tubliss system but not much info when it came down to dual sport use,

I installed the tubliss system on my KLX400R (400E) a few days ago with Maxxis IT Desert (stiff) tires. I have since rode 400 miles in all road conditions.

After some trial and error testing, I ended up with 14 PSI front and rear. Probably about half of the mileage was bad pavement with lots of potholes, then the remainder of the mileage was either cobblestone or riding in mountains with mud, loose rocks, and some goat trails.

I'm sort of lazy and don't like the hassle of changing my tire pressure everytime I change road surface conditions. So I am experimenting with a straight 14 PSI across the board for now. I'm a recreational rider, not a racer.

I'm limiting my hwy speeds to about 65 mph and usually that is only when I'm passing someone.

Curious to know if any other dual sport riders have had long term experience with this product?

I have Tubliss sitting in the garage just waiting for a tire change to install it. I emailed Tubliss a year or so and asked about using their 'tube' on highways etc. They said its not DOT approved and didnt recommend it, of course thats probably what their lawyers told them to say.

Back on topic, I too would like to hear from other DS riders that use Tubliss.

I'm happy with your testing and a sets going on the pig:ride:

I'm going to give them a try also. Just wish they were a little less expensive. Has anyone found these for less than retail?

There was some guy on a KTM who rode down into Mexico on all road surfaces last year. He put 3000 miles on his bike without tire problems. I know they are not DOT approved also and there are all kind of horror stories about instant failure if the tubliss/tube fails, but the same catastrophic result is likely with a conventional tube..

It seems to me with the tubliss "tube" sitting low in the well of the rim, the available air pocket, and sealant in the tire, that it will be a more remote possibility of a tube failure.

the only real problem i can forsee with the tubliss system is centripidle {or in this case is it centrifigaul} force. as the tire spins the force outward is huge, think of a tf dragster spinning its rear wheels, they get taller. it is not a problem for a conventional tube, because the tire carcass is designed to withstand these forces, the tube is supported by the tire. the tubliss system sitting down it the rim leaves room for it to grow outward and instantly losing its air and causing catastrophic failure.

i would say it is fine for lower speed stuff, but any sustained speeds up in the 70 80 100 mph range COULD cause a problem imho

1 Year of DS use with zero issues. The bike has been raced, D/Sported & some hard running on asphalt with no issues at all. I generally run 14psi (F&R)for the DS type riding.

The inner carcass is extremely tough & many Adventurer bikes/ riders have had great success using the Tubliss. There so much Red tape in getting DOT approval & am sure once the Tubliss Guy recoups his start up costs, he'll get the necessary approval.

Tubliss customer service is excellent as well.

Curious what bike you have been running the tubliss setup on johno 33772? I rode again yesterday about 100 miles, only problem was I had to go to three different pemex's before I could find one with a compressor that went up to 110 psi for the tubliss tube. My tires have not lost any pressure, but the inner tube tends to lose about 3 or 4 lbs every few days.

I use a cheap bicycle pump and have no troubles keeping the tubliss tube up to pressure.

S

so you put 110 psi in tubliss liner, and 14 psiish in the tire? that sounds more interesting. with 110psi it would make a good rimlock, i hear you are supposed to put slime in the tire once you bead it as a precaution, do you also put slime in the tubliss liner?

oops forgot to ask...how hard is it to install in a stiff mx type tire, it looks, by its design that it would be hard to get to fit between the beads without any twisted or pinched spots

Just install the tire the same as the video:

http://www.nuetech.com/video.shtml

It was a piece of cake. One thing I noticed yesterday is the tire seems to run a lot cooler without a conventional tube rubbing inside it.

I tried pumping up about 10lbs into the inner tube yesterday with a hand held small bicycle pump, but whenever I unscrewed the hose from the valve stem, I ended up losing more air than I put in. I've got a floor pump with a flip type connector so I'll try that next time. Looking for a pump to carry with me on the road and so I guess I will try a small 12v campbell hausfield pump.

thanx i have been sceptikle {spell check lol} but i am becoming more interested

Curious what bike you have been running the tubliss setup on johno 33772? I rode again yesterday about 100 miles, only problem was I had to go to three different pemex's before I could find one with a compressor that went up to 110 psi for the tubliss tube. My tires have not lost any pressure, but the inner tube tends to lose about 3 or 4 lbs every few days.

KTM 300 XC-W, the only negative thing I can find on the Tubliss system is that you need to balance your wheels. My front end starts to bounce at at 30mph on Asphalt, the balancing will stop that. Do not notice the bounce on dirt.

Buy a decent bicycle pump & inflate to about 120 psi & then remove the air chuck. The inner tube is very small & a small amount of air will be lost on removal of the air chuck. Use a new tire on installation with lots of lube on the bead. Watch the video 10 times & it's an easy install.

Some folks install Slime in the tire which definately helps out west with Cactus /thorns e.t.c.

Agreed, I need to balance my front tire also, esp at low speeds it's a thumping.

Other than that I am going to try to air up with the small 12v campbell hausfield pump. I'm gone for days at a time far from a gas station and need some kind of small pump in the event I have a problem. CO2 cartridges are not readily available where I live and the floor stand bicycle pump is too cumbersome to carry. Maybe a foot pump would work ok.

its too bad you have to put the valve stem so close to the rimlock, that cant help with balancing, and it sucks to have to drill another hole in my rim when there is already 2 in my front and rear.

im confused as to the reasoning for the tube valve stem to be so close the the outer tube rim lock. air goes all around a tube, what does it matter where it enters the tube?

im pretty dumb tho so i must just not be seeing it

its too bad you have to put the valve stem so close to the rimlock, that cant help with balancing, and it sucks to have to drill another hole in my rim when there is already 2 in my front and rear.

im confused as to the reasoning for the tube valve stem to be so close the the outer tube rim lock. air goes all around a tube, what does it matter where it enters the tube?

im pretty dumb tho so i must just not be seeing it

I don't think it matters. But on my wheels the two holes are where they show them.

the only real problem i can forsee with the tubliss system is centripidle {or in this case is it centrifigaul} force. as the tire spins the force outward is huge, think of a tf dragster spinning its rear wheels, they get taller. it is not a problem for a conventional tube, because the tire carcass is designed to withstand these forces, the tube is supported by the tire. the tubliss system sitting down it the rim leaves room for it to grow outward and instantly losing its air and causing catastrophic failure. i would say it is fine for lower speed stuff, but any sustained speeds up in the 70 80 100 mph range COULD cause a problem imho

Not a problem at all. The Tubliss carcass is very tough, just like a high speed road bicycle tire. There are no issues at all with dual sport and higher speed use, other than the lack of DOT specs. The tires themselves would be the limiting factor, not the Tubliss system itself.

KTM 300 XC-W, the only negative thing I can find on the Tubliss system is that you need to balance your wheels. My front end starts to bounce at at 30mph on Asphalt, the balancing will stop that. Do not notice the bounce on dirt.

Yes the Tubliss setup does require balancing, but no more than for wheels with single rim locks. I run Tubliss front and rear and find that it requires 3 - 4 ozs of weight to balance, which is the same as that required for balancing single rim lock wheels.

its too bad you have to put the valve stem so close to the rimlock, that cant help with balancing, and it sucks to have to drill another hole in my rim when there is already 2 in my front and rear.

im confused as to the reasoning for the tube valve stem to be so close the the outer tube rim lock. air goes all around a tube, what does it matter where it enters the tube?

im pretty dumb tho so i must just not be seeing it

That's why I install my Tubliss systems with the low and high pressure valve stems 180 degrees opposite of each other. The only small issue is that it makes the initial Tubliss installation a little more difficult. To me it is worth it as once the Tubliss system is installed, it remains in place for future tire changes. I am on the third tire change with the original Tubliss setup.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now