Tire Pressure?

I'm pretty new to trials and I was just wondering what you typically run for front and rear pressure. What do you run in dry rocky conditions. Wet and muddy. Let me know and thanks for your time answering my questions.

Front is typically 4-7 pounds and the rear is around 2-5 pounds. Obviously adjust for traction, but also for riding style and terrain. If you're going to be doing splatters and riding on pointy rocks or are trail riding, add air. If you know that all you're going to be doing is sandy or muddy turns, you can go pretty low without any risk.

Front is typically 4-7 pounds and the rear is around 2-5 pounds. Obviously adjust for traction, but also for riding style and terrain. If you're going to be doing splatters and riding on pointy rocks or are trail riding, add air. If you know that all you're going to be doing is sandy or muddy turns, you can go pretty low without any risk.

I'm going to add to this question. What does everyone use to add air while in the field? Does it require that you be near a haul vehicle to have access to an air pump? I know some of the flat repair kits have a CO2 for after a flat, but that does not seem like the right tool for change in pressure for riding conditions.

let's hear what everyone has..

:ride:

I have a small mountain bike pump. Telescopic it draws out three times its length and fits in a tool belt bag.

I would recomend a plastic body type as some Ally ones get dented too easliy.

Ideal to add pressure and puncture repair. can do 40psi easy but slow (2-3mins).

I fell out with CO2 cylinders, a pump never runs out of air!:ride:

I'm pretty new to trials and I was just wondering what you typically run for front and rear pressure. What do you run in dry rocky conditions. Wet and muddy. Let me know and thanks for your time answering my questions.

Looking for a more specific number?

In my tube-type front and tubeless rear Michelins I’ve run 6 psi front and 4psi rear for many years.

I switched to Dunlops a few years ago and dropped to 3.5psi in the rear.

I run this in all conditions: rocks, splatters, mud, etc.

I haven’t had a flat in over 15 years.

(and don’t forget to check your tires after every loop. Things can change)

(I run these pressures in the local expert class, so if you’re just starting out, they’re probably a good starting point for you, too)

And yes, a simple bicycle pump will do the trick, unless you need to seat a bead, in which case a co2 won’t do it (from my experience about 15 years ago on the trail)

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