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I've found that most roadracers with a dirt background use both brakes. Most of the top pro's also use both brakes. The rear doesn't do much, but it does help. If you can reduce your laptimes by 0.3 by dragging the rear brake, it will help you win races.

I can't agree with that. Its not the brakes that will shave off laptimes in road racing anyway, its the gas

ride safe :thumbsup:

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I can't agree with that. Its not the brakes that will shave off laptimes in road racing anyway, its the gas

ride safe :thumbsup:

That's ridiculous. Good brakes, and knowing how to use them is the #1 tool for going fast. Any idiot can pin a throttle WFO, but the guy who can slow down and get into the turn without messing up his flow will be way faster. I have seen with my own eyes timed sections, with laser timers, guys go faster down a straight that let off 5 feet before the check point, than guys who kept it pinned through the mark. The front brake is 70% of your braking ability, the rear should never be locked up unless your trying to square a turn indoor or something. The rear should be applied just enough to act like a ABS brake, not a lock up and slide brake.

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That's ridiculous. Good brakes, and knowing how to use them is the #1 tool for going fast. Any idiot can pin a throttle WFO, but the guy who can slow down and get into the turn without messing up his flow will be way faster. I have seen with my own eyes timed sections, with laser timers, guys go faster down a straight that let off 5 feet before the check point, than guys who kept it pinned through the mark. The front brake is 70% of your braking ability, the rear should never be locked up unless your trying to square a turn indoor or something. The rear should be applied just enough to act like a ABS brake, not a lock up and slide brake.

I am talking about road racing sport bikes, not dirt bikes. :thumbsup:

Obviously you have to be good on the brakes to be a good racer. But you don't do $hit for laptimes by being on the brakes in road racing. The less time on the brakes, the better. Grab it hard and then back on the gas

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I am talking about road racing sport bikes, not dirt bikes. :thumbsup:

Obviously you have to be good on the brakes to be a good racer. But you don't do $hit for laptimes by being on the brakes in road racing. The less time on the brakes, the better. Grab it hard and then back on the gas

He was talking about roadracing.

I really want to know your thoughts and how you feel about trail braking.

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He was talking about roadracing.

I really want to know your thoughts and how you feel about trail braking.

I don't think he was, but I'll let him speak for himself. I don't think he even roadraces

Trail braking: yea, pretty much required to go fast. What about it? Road racing is all about carrying speed, like most other motorsports. Don't misunderstand what I'm trying to get across. Yes, of course you need to be good on brakes. But being on the brakes will not do anything for you in that sport. Being on the gas will

I'd like to know how using the rear brake will help you win races if it doesn't help much to begin with? And please don't tell me its to square off the corner. I was never pro, but raced for 5 years (even nationally) and hold an expert license. I know you raced as an amateur, I respect you as a fellow racer, but please don't come at me with that bull$hit bro. I know who you are and your race number.

Anyway, I think this topic is going in the wrong direction. Thank you to the guys that contributed your input. Much appreciated :thumbsup:

/unsubscribing

Edited by squidkilla

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The quicker you can decelerate the longer you can stay on the gas prior to doing it.

With that in mind, I use both brakes to the max. 'Rear max' means not locking up.  'Front max' means not adversely effecting control.

My lap times dropped like a stone when I started practicing hard decelerating in an open area.

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I never touch my rear brake I only use my front brake. I’m trail riding with some really motocross dudes and they lock up there rear brake and whack the throttle out of the corner and it looks fast but I’m just as fast in the corners when entering slower and only using front brake and only give it gas so it doesn’t spin.

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MX TRACK:

Rear: As much as I can without locking up.

Front: As much as I can without loss of control.

This gives you max stopping power which allows you stay on throttle as long as possible.

TRAIL:

There are 2 ways to skin the cat.

If you live on rear brake: You gain the control the rear brake gives you. You can even steer with the rear brake. But you lose the control of having the ball of your foot on the peg. It's a trade off.

If you live on the front brake: As long as you are good with the lever and can avoid plunging forks, you can keep your foot planted on the peg which let's you control the bike with your legs. Again, trade off.

 I do woods with an extremely fast rider who lives on rear brake. I live on front and plant the ball of my right foot on the peg.

Edited by gatorfan

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The advice in the Semics video was very helpful for me in getting my corner speed and control up (The one he posted here). I only got my head around this recently. The key for me was understanding the the bike is way more stable coming into the corner with the back end sliding out slightly. His video really goes into this, and it was something that needed to click for me. 

To me, the feeling is that I can countersteer out if the front wheel starts to wash, and stay stable. But I can only do that if the back wheel is already sliding out slightly. If the back wheel is not kicked out a little then pointing the front wheel out of the corner is literally steering the entire bike the wrong way.

It was counter-intuitive for me at first, because it requires you to be aggressive on both brakes. As a slower rider I tended to coast all the way into the corner having braked earlier.

 

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