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Mx Powder Coating Database

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I've been Powder Coating for about 5 yrs now. I thought it would be interesting to start a thread obtaining color matches, and which brand of powder looks best. I'm thinking relative to the small guy - not production / custom mix (i.e.- Eastwood, Columbia, PBP, Caswell, and other small qty mail order suppliers).

For example, I am currently in need of a gold to match the mid 80's Honda Z50R rims?

My initial contribution will be:

XR75 Plastic (Meirer Replacement stuff)= Eastwood / Bright Red

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Can't really contribute but figured I would ask question...

I'm looking to get into powdercoating and was curious as to a good brand to buy some diy equipment from.

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Can't really contribute but figured I would ask question...

I'm looking to get into powdercoating and was curious as to a good brand to buy some diy equipment from.

You can't go wrong with the Hypersmooth Pony from Columbia Coatings. I ran the Eastwood gun but even as a DIY'er myself, I have reached the limits of the eastwood gun.

Stay away from those guns you see on harbor freight and e-bay that are made by Chicago Electric, they really are junk.

If you do get into it, plan on making room for a home oven in your garage because you will outgrow the toaster oven within a week. I found a old used home oven for $30 in the local classifieds. The only expense was running the electrical to the garage, which can be done yourself.

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You can't go wrong with the Hypersmooth Pony from Columbia Coatings. I ran the Eastwood gun but even as a DIY'er myself, I have reached the limits of the eastwood gun.

Stay away from those guns you see on harbor freight and e-bay that are made by Chicago Electric, they really are junk.

If you do get into it, plan on making room for a home oven in your garage because you will outgrow the toaster oven within a week. I found a old used home oven for $30 in the local classifieds. The only expense was running the electrical to the garage, which can be done yourself.

100% correct. Also, keep in mind, one of the most challenging parts to PC'ing is prep (i.e.- sand blasting). Essentially you need a larger cabinet (or area) than your oven, as you need work around the part. This is my limitation, I built an over large enough for frames and the whole 9 yards. But, my blast cabinet only will fit a wheel - max. So, I have to run all large parts to the blaster next town over. Works, but your at their mercy as far $$ and time.

PC'ing is worth getting into if your into restoration's or the like. But, if your only looking to do a set of rims here and there, I would consider finding a DIY'er local guy, and paying him. On the other hand, if you have alot of riding buddies, you can always work out horse trades, etc...

Good Luck, and have fun!

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My company has been doing powder coating on a large scale for 6 years. My opinion for powder suppliers is flat out the best powder out there for the price is Tiger Drylac. They have a color wheel that is un-matched in the RAL colors. You can get any single color you want.

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I don't want to steal anyones thread here, but since this is going to be the powdercoating database, I figured this applies.

I've heard of issues with PCing hubs on bikes. I actually worked with a guy that had the hubs of his KTM PC'd, and his bearings were no longer an interference fit, they were more of a slip fit. On top of that I've heard that there are issues with weakening (Annealing) aluminum, especially cast parts like hubs. Any of you experienced guys have any info on this?

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I don't want to steal anyones thread here, but since this is going to be the powdercoating database, I figured this applies.

I've heard of issues with PCing hubs on bikes. I actually worked with a guy that had the hubs of his KTM PC'd, and his bearings were no longer an interference fit, they were more of a slip fit. On top of that I've heard that there are issues with weakening (Annealing) aluminum, especially cast parts like hubs. Any of you experienced guys have any info on this?

Yes, I would never get a MC hub over 275 deg F. Just somthing I would not want to break on a MC.

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100% correct. Also, keep in mind, one of the most challenging parts to PC'ing is prep (i.e.- sand blasting). Essentially you need a larger cabinet (or area) than your oven, as you need work around the part. This is my limitation, I built an over large enough for frames and the whole 9 yards. But, my blast cabinet only will fit a wheel - max. So, I have to run all large parts to the blaster next town over. Works, but your at their mercy as far $$ and time.

PC'ing is worth getting into if your into restoration's or the like. But, if your only looking to do a set of rims here and there, I would consider finding a DIY'er local guy, and paying him. On the other hand, if you have alot of riding buddies, you can always work out horse trades, etc...

Good Luck, and have fun!

Can you post some pictures and information up of your oven. Right now I'm about to take on the task of building a bigger one as well to do frames and what not.

thank you

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Yes, I would never get a MC hub over 275 deg F. Just somthing I would not want to break on a MC.

Thats all fine, but do they even sell powders that bake at that low?

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They do have low cure powders they are expensive.

What is low cure? 250F, 300F? Also how much extra are you talking for these types of powders vs. common powders? Double the price, tripple?

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I honestly have not used it we only powder coat steel and aluminum. We have used high temp paint but never the low cure paint. Mostly it's for powdercoating plastic, wood and other items that are susceptible to melting / burning at high heat. If you are serious about it call these guys. They are very helpful http://www.tiger-coatings.us/

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My company has been doing powder coating on a large scale for 6 years. My opinion for powder suppliers is flat out the best powder out there for the price is Tiger Drylac. They have a color wheel that is un-matched in the RAL colors. You can get any single color you want.

Tiger will hose you on all small quantities (anything under their standard 44lb box) but they do stock allot of the RAL's. Any company that charges 3X the standard price because you only need 5lbs is robbing the little guy.

We buy all our small quantities from Dupont or IFS without getting hosed.

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We have had nothing but bad luck with IFS. Really for our small quantities we use cardinal or just charge our customers more on small orders. I guess that's not effective if you are the end user.

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columbiacoatings.com is a good supply place for cheap small quantities and as well with caswell

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powderbythepound.com is also good for small amounts of powder here and there.

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what about for triple clamps? if i wanted mine black, would it be safe to do? or will it weaken them? (06 honda crf 450x)

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what about for triple clamps? if i wanted mine black, would it be safe to do? or will it weaken them? (06 honda crf 450x)

I just looked over some of our oven data pack readings and only the thinnest aluminium material reach 400 deg when the oven was set at 425. Most lines are set for a 20-25 min cure at 400 degrees and the material almost never reaches that temp. Most material readings are around 370 deg.

We powder coat aluminum almost every day and never had any fatigue issues but then again my KTM is stock in color and I have no plans coating the swing arm.

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