Jump to content
IT'S NOT TOO LATE! Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  

Precautions to take when starting an engine that has been sat for a year or two??

Recommended Posts

Guys,

I've just put a 400SM engine in my 400E, the engine I bought has approximately 1800 miles on it, and has been sat around for a year or two doing nothing. It was drained of oil some time ago by the looks of it!

What precautions should I take? Is there anything special I need to do to make sure the engine is appropriately lubricated? I'm a bit worried when I fire it up it may be starved of oil momentarily?

Cheers,

Con

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might want to crank the engine with the spark plug out and vovle cover off until you see oil ooze from the cam area.

Hope the big end is OK and the engine was stored in a dry area with steady temperatures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would put oil in the engine. (or change what's in there) I would take off the cam cover, and lube everything up top, and I would fire it up, and watch for oil to flow. Since the engine is all on ball bearings (besides the cams) it will be fine at an idle as the pressure comes up.

But William is right... hope it was dry. The bearings could have rust on them now, and could fail quickly.

On second thought... I may take the clutch side cover off just to get a look at the bearings to get an idea if any rust started to form. You will need to drain the coolant (should be changed anyway) and a new gasket.

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Above advice very good. If you suspect any rust in cylinder or has been sitting anywhere damp. Start by taking plug out and "Fogging" cylinder by spraying some Knocker Loose, Kroil or PB blaster in there. Let it set at least 1/2 hour then drain the oil and take a look. See if any has seeped into the oil or any running rust has made its way down there. That will be the worst case scenario. If it looks good, turn the engine over by hand. (William1 or Noble can probably tell you how exactly to do this with a wernch as I have never done it on a DRZ, just v-8 car and boat engines) It will probably turn hard so work it back and forth a little to free up the rings.

The worst thing you can do with an engine that sits for a while is fire it right up as it can peel the rings off if they are rusted to the cylinder. If the engine turns ok, then lube the top end, If you can pull the head without too much trouble you can check the rings and cyl and see if its rusted. You will have the tank off and plug out anyway but I dont think you can see enough through the plug hole to see rust without a snake or pencil cam.

After you lube the top end and get a look at the cam chain (could be at the end) then put her back together, add new oil and give it a try.

Maybe one of the Guru's will weigh in on the susceptibility of DRZ rings and Nicasil cylinders and this may not be necessary at all.

Takes a bit more time than just lube and charge the bat but cheap ins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be pulling the spark plug, but a bit of oil straight into the cylinder, leave it for a few hours, crank the motor by hand, then chuck the plug back in and give it a crack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The engine has been stored inside a house which I can only assume was heated.

There is no sign of corrosion on the outside of the block at all.

I'll be pulling both the primary cover and the magneto cover in order to do the primary nut and stator loctite fixes.

Will this give me a good indication of the state of the piston and barrel in terms of corrosion (obviously I won't be able to see those areas, but if the bottom end looks OK the rest should be too?

I know the engine turns over by hand as I've already done this with the plug out on the flywheel nut before I bought the engine.

I'll put fresh oil in and turn her over by hand with the cam cover off once I've done all the fixes... Where exactly are the oilways near the cams? Will it be obvious if the oil is flowing to the cams?

I'm thinking I ought to treat the first load of oil as a flush and only run the bike for 10 miles or so?

Cheers,

Con

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure the barrel will be fine. It seems, the one bearing that suffers from storage is the crank big end. No way to check that other than to run the engine. If it suffered, in a while it will develop a knock.

Do you 'fixes'.

Crank it with the spark plug out and valve cover off. Use the starter motor to spin the engine. You'll be looking for oil to be oozing out of the cam caps and dripping.

Finish putting it together and ride.

Yeah, a soon thereafter oil change is a good idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×