Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Stripped crankcase houseing (lower oil filter bolt)

Recommended Posts

It's been a while since I have posted. I was prepping the bike for the first post baby ride. While installing a new oil filter I over-torqued the lower oil filter bolt and stripped the housing.

It is for sure the housing and not the bolt because there was aluminum (or whatever the crankcase is made of) in the threads of the bolt.

Not being the most mechanically inclined fella, what are my options? (I have searched and found lots of info on the tranny bolt but not this).

Do I get this:

http://www.crfsonly.com/catalog/product_info.php/manufacturers_id/59/products_id/3158

With a new gasket and just replace it?

Are there aftermarket options?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a nut driver to tighten those bolts to remind me of how little torque they require. THere is nothing to force the housing out, so they only need to be tight enough so they dont come loose. In fact if one finger tightened them would probably good enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I even tried to tighten it to torque specs last time and the bolt snapped off inside. Got lucky it turned right out. You for sure will probably want to helli coil it if you cannot recover any of the threads to get a good tight fit. You don't want a leak there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

two things to consider...

Changing that side case is easy, however it's also your engine numbers (next to countershaft). And that... is a PITA as it requires you to do some fancy DMV work. Also, some dealers need more info when selling you the side case... it's not a simple "purchase" for everyone (I'm not sure how CRFSOnly sales work on that case).

EDIT: Oh wait... the more I look, the case you need isn't part of the left crankcase with engine numbers. *PHEW!*

... because that is a PITA to replace, and is more than 3x the cost!

I'd heli-coil it too.

The part to do the work is cheap, can be found anywhere (like Ebay) and you'll get some spares once you do one. You don't need to be a mechanic to know how to work the tool, just some common sense. However, know that a helicoil is basically a temp-long term fix. Remember, it's just a spring... thats fitted into some new threads of the case. Not the best cure all, but they do well for 'quick fixes'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is an alternative to heli-coils, its called time-sert. Flanders sells them and its a much better system, check it out. I used it to fix threads on my son's CR250 head bolts and they are better than new. Flanders sells a ton of them to fix the dreaded Ford Explorer spark plug blow out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are so much better than Heli-Coils IMO. Just a better engineered system. When you screw in that special tap and expand the bottom they are really wedged in.

Flanders in Pasadena has all the metric sizes in stock as well as the kits. I know Paul Flanders personally and he showed them to me on a tour of the place, then a few months later my son grenaded his 250 and I took Paul up on his offer, no regrets for sure. Since then I fixed my other boy's KTM subframe with an insert and it worked perfectly in the square tubing, a helicoil would not have worked in that application.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They are so much better than Heli-Coils IMO. Just a better engineered system. When you screw in that special tap and expand the bottom they are really wedged in.

Flanders in Pasadena has all the metric sizes in stock as well as the kits. I know Paul Flanders personally and he showed them to me on a tour of the place, then a few months later my son grenaded his 250 and I took Paul up on his offer, no regrets for sure. Since then I fixed my other boy's KTM subframe with an insert and it worked perfectly in the square tubing, a helicoil would not have worked in that application.

Thanks for the info. That is great to know and for me it semi local.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is an alternative to heli-coils, its called time-sert. Flanders sells them and its a much better system, check it out. I used it to fix threads on my son's CR250 head bolts and they are better than new. Flanders sells a ton of them to fix the dreaded Ford Explorer spark plug blow out.

I've been a huge fan of Time-Sert as well, even though they are much more costly than heli-coil. I guess there's a time and place for either...

EG: If the bolt holds a lot of pressure, or you need a perfect fit (like a head bolt or sub-frame bolt)... Time-Sert. If it's allowing slop or not holding vitals (like a side panel or fender) then heli-coil.

To add to this, I have a Nut-Sert kit... which I love, but it won't countersink the head of the 'sert'. Not practical in all cases, or where you have a bolt hole with a bottom, or no ability to rivet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×