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which spoke torque wrench?

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ive finally decided to get one, whats a good basic wrench that will get the job done? im not looking for anything real fancy. thanks alot.

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Thghten by tune works better. Torque wrenches add nipple friction to the torque, tuning does NOT.

Don

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Thghten by tune works better. Torque wrenches add nipple friction to the torque, tuning does NOT.

Don

What is the process that you do this by?

MAX!!!

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Thghten by tune works better. Torque wrenches add nipple friction to the torque, tuning does NOT.

Don

thats what ive been doing for a while but you cant get all of them the exact same....well i guess you could but it would take a very long time, and when you torque them they all dont loosen up for a lot longer.

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Thghten by tune works better. Torque wrenches add nipple friction to the torque, tuning does NOT.

Don

:thumbsup::thumbsup:especialy with aluminum nipples.They really like to seize.

Tap on each spoke for one lap to get a feel for the sound.Some wheels will have longer spokes on one side so they will sound a little different. Then start the tighting process.

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Thghten by tune works better. Torque wrenches add nipple friction to the torque, tuning does NOT.

Don

:thumbsup::lol::ride::lol::lol:This is the stupidest thing I have read on here in a long time. Do you have tuning forks built into your ears? You actually think you can "hear" 2in.lbs. difference?:lol::lol::lol:You actually think it is more accurate to tap a spoke, listen, and adjust than it is to use a calibrated tool w/ proper reading to obtain accurate tension. I bet your one of those guys who thinks 3 fingers between his chain and the swing arm means the chain is adjusted properly, instead of reading the manual and using the measurement specified my the manufacturer.:lol::lol::lol:Technology is a great thing, and I use it when available, this isn't 1982.

MAX!!!

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:thumbsup::thumbsup:especialy with aluminum nipples.They really like to seize.

Tap on each spoke for one lap to get a feel for the sound.Some wheels will have longer spokes on one side so they will sound a little different. Then start the tighting process.

:ride::lol::lol::lol::lol:See post above.

AS far as the aluminum nipple seizing, it has nothing to do w/ using the proper tools to obtain the proper tension specified by the manufacturer - your nipples seize to the spokes due to surface rust post washing/riding. All you need to do is spray a little WD40 where the spoke goes into the nipple after every wash:thumbsup:this will prevent the seizure.

Another good place to spray WD40 after washings is at the chain adjuster bolts.

MAX!!!

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I got this one - because it had adjustable torque settings as well as multiple size heads.

http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/productDetail.do?navType=type&navTitle=Dirt+Bike+Parts&webCatId=19&webTypeId=168&prodFamilyId=25980&brandId=105

the g force unit

and fwiw - aluminum and stainless steel do not rust! they can do some other nasty stuff - but antiseize and proper torque values - are a good way to go!

Carl Johansson

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:thumbsup::lol::ride::lol::lol:This is the stupidest thing I have read on here in a long time. Do you have tuning forks built into your ears? You actually think you can "hear" 2in.lbs. difference?:lol::lol::lol:You actually think it is more accurate to tap a spoke, listen, and adjust than it is to use a calibrated tool w/ proper reading to obtain accurate tension. I bet your one of those guys who thinks 3 fingers between his chain and the swing arm means the chain is adjusted properly, instead of reading the manual and using the measurement specified my the manufacturer.:lol::lol::lol:Technology is a great thing, and I use it when available, this isn't 1982.

MAX!!!

What ever......been doing it for 27 years.(And yes i work on bikes other than my own.)

Not "by the book"I know,but it works.

Between a sticky seizing nipple and a smooth one could you be able to tell with a Spoke torque wrench? umm...no.

After you "properly" torque each spoke,go back and tap each one and listen close,you'll see.I used to use one of those wrenches,it's waste of money unless the wheel is NEW!

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:thumbsup::lol::ride::lol::lol:This is the stupidest thing I have read on here in a long time. Do you have tuning forks built into your ears? You actually think you can "hear" 2in.lbs. difference?:lol::lol::lol:You actually think it is more accurate to tap a spoke, listen, and adjust than it is to use a calibrated tool w/ proper reading to obtain accurate tension. I bet your one of those guys who thinks 3 fingers between his chain and the swing arm means the chain is adjusted properly, instead of reading the manual and using the measurement specified my the manufacturer.:lol::lol::lol:Technology is a great thing, and I use it when available, this isn't 1982.

MAX!!!

While I concur that using a torque is probably the best method, I do know as being a musician that I can identify tones that are so close together you would not even hear them. So, I basically have tuning forks in my ears. So, it is possible that he could hear a difference in 2in.lbs. I also use this method and have never had any problems with my rims or spokes. It may not be the pro way or the "right" way, but it works and gets the job done properly. With a properly trained ear, a person can tell what note almost every sound in the world makes.

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Thghten by tune works better. Torque wrenches add nipple friction to the torque, tuning does NOT.

Don

While I concur that using a torque is probably the best method, I do know as being a musician that I can identify tones that are so close together you would not even hear them. So, I basically have tuning forks in my ears. So, it is possible that he could hear a difference in 2in.lbs. I also use this method and have never had any problems with my rims or spokes. It may not be the pro way or the "right" way, but it works and gets the job done properly. With a properly trained ear, a person can tell what note almost every sound in the world makes.

I didn't say that it can't be done by hearing. Reread his post, "Tighten by tune works better..." That's what is so rediculus, there is no way it's better than a properly calibrated insturment:lol:

MAX!!!

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Anyone else other than scalejockey get one of these after years of not using one? I LOVE buying tools but don't think it would be a "How did I get by all those years without this!" moment...

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While I concur that using a torque is probably the best method, I do know as being a musician that I can identify tones that are so close together you would not even hear them. So, I basically have tuning forks in my ears. So, it is possible that he could hear a difference in 2in.lbs. I also use this method and have never had any problems with my rims or spokes. It may not be the pro way or the "right" way, but it works and gets the job done properly. With a properly trained ear, a person can tell what note almost every sound in the world makes.

While i have no doubt that you, scale jockey and many others can hear minute (read that as Mine oot) diferences in tones between spokes, what I have my doubts about is how you correlate those tones to a ft lb or inch lb. You can hear differences - but how do you know what "tone" is 48 ft lbs?

I guess you could get a torque wrench - seat the spoke and nipple to the speced out torque - then hit it and listen - eventually you could train your ear - although I would suspect you would have to "recalibrate" everytime you wanted to tighten a spoke! But of course - that would entail buying and using the evil torque wrench - so thats out!

Tapping the spokes is a great way to quickly check and see if you have differences in spoke tightnesses, and you can even get em all to make the same sound - just no way of knowing what that sound means ft lb wise!

Carl "tone deaf but drug free" Johansson

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What ever......been doing it for 27 years.(And yes i work on bikes other than my own.)

Not "by the book"I know,but it works.

Between a sticky seizing nipple and a smooth one could you be able to tell with a Spoke torque wrench? umm...no.

After you "properly" torque each spoke,go back and tap each one and listen close,you'll see.I used to use one of those wrenches,it's waste of money unless the wheel is NEW!

Hey jockey, if the spoke is seized to the nipple, guess what, it's time to replace that spoke and nipple.

An adjustable spoke torque wrench works great on all wheel sets regardless of their age. Like I said, if the spoke is seized to the nipple, replace them.:thumbsup:

MAX!!!

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It is really interesting to hear the arguments from those that would rather spend money than use their brains.

Don

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I use the tuSk wrench from rockymountain it works just fine it comes with different heads for different spokes which makes it very versatile (AND IT WAS ONLY $14.)

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