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Performance of shortened suspension?

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After riding with my seat cut down for a year, I've grown tired of the weird seating position, relative to the bars/pegs. I'm gonna go back to a stock seat and have the suspension shortened 1.5 inches.

What should I expect in terms of performance? Do I have to give up some of the plushness?

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There is a compromise with shortened suspension. Lowering the bike lowers the CG and also shortens the wheelbase. Both of these things can make a bike turn better.

However, your bike will now be 1.5" into the stroke and therefore that far into the progression of the linkage and fork travel. So yes, it's possible that you'll feel this as harshness.

Valving can be changed to help, but it's up to you if you want to go that route.

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Come on RKS1. This guys asking for some help. You can help him out a bit better than that, can't you?

"If you want to go down that route." ??? It sounds like you're saying, "You could do that, but it would suck. Why don't you just grow some longer legs."

Sorry. I'm just jerk'n with ya, but it did sound a bit jacked.

Grouch, I wish I had the answer, but I don't. I am curious about this subject, however, because I saw RC's bike a few years ago. Now I've seen it in magazine, but when I saw it in front of me, I was blown. That's a short bike!!! Then I realized RC was behind me. RC's only 5'4." RC is flat footing his 450. The seat height is lower than a CRF150R!

Now with all that said, how is it that Suzuki can lower his bike that much, but get the performance of 15 championships? I don't get it.

Then there's all the other racers. Aside from Windham and Milsaps, what's the average height of the racers? 5'6"? The new YZF450 has a seat height of 39 inches. ?????? Very confusing. I guess the answer is Japanese are actually really tall people. :thumbsup:

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I'd really like to know what to do also. I'm 5'4" on a good day. I was thinking of cutting the seat on my CRF 450. I have the ability to shorten the rear shock with a spacer, but how much? I have never had forks apart yet. Can I just slide them up to balance out the height or do I have to shorten them somehow? Was thinking about the Kouba link also. All I know is I'm not close to tippy-toeing the bike. Maybe I'll get used to it, but it sure is uncomfortable now sliding from side to side to one foot balance the bike.:thumbsup:

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Uh, I thought I WAS helping him. The "go down that route" comment had to do more with the cost associated with a revalve - not that "it would suck". My apologies for not explaining myself better. It's been my experience that some people just want a lower bike and don't want to go to the extra expense of re-springing and revalving. Both of which would make the bike handle better. I'm not here to twist arms, you know?

Looney, the problem on the CRF's with sliding the forks up is that there's not much room below the bars to move the forks. If you want the bike lowered an inch or more, you'll be better off with internal spacers to shorten the fork (and shock).

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rks1,I have rebuilt a ton of snowmobile shocks and shortened them for racing purposes, but I have never had forks apart. This is my first bike. I thought the dealer mentioned cutting the fork springs to lower shorten the forks. Can I use internal spacers in the forks to shorten them like I would use in he rear shock? I can make any size spacer I would need or would it still involve cutting the springs?

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You need to move the spring seat on the forks. This is done by machining in a new circlip groove on the inner cartridge tube. Then you use a spacer on the damping rod to make up the difference there.

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I too felt my bike was too tall for me. I tried a Kouba link. It lowered the bike 1 3/4", and that part was great. The suspension wasn't bad, but it was "off". I could not seem to get the suspension right. Mind you I never touched the suspension before, so I have zero experience. On my own I seemed to be throwing the bike off more w/ my adjustments. Someone with more experience could have gotten it correct, but I became too frustrated. I returned the link (30 day no hassle return to Kouba) and sent my full suspension to AS Racing for lowering, revalve, etc.. I am so happy w/ everything now. My confidence has increased by ten, and the bike and I are sympatico! I think my suspension is smooth, comfortable and controlable. Hope this helps.

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There is a compromise with shortened suspension. Lowering the bike lowers the CG and also shortens the wheelbase. Both of these things can make a bike turn better.

However, your bike will now be 1.5" into the stroke and therefore that far into the progression of the linkage and fork travel. So yes, it's possible that you'll feel this as harshness.

Valving can be changed to help, but it's up to you if you want to go that route.

Uh, I thought I WAS helping him. The "go down that route" comment had to do more with the cost associated with a revalve - not that "it would suck". My apologies for not explaining myself better. It's been my experience that some people just want a lower bike and don't want to go to the extra expense of re-springing and revalving. Both of which would make the bike handle better. I'm not here to twist arms, you know?

Looney, the problem on the CRF's with sliding the forks up is that there's not much room below the bars to move the forks. If you want the bike lowered an inch or more, you'll be better off with internal spacers to shorten the fork (and shock).

So let me ask the question again, this time being more specific...

If I have the forks and shock from my 250X shortened by 1.5" and revalved, how much of the bike's smoothness do I have to give up to keep bottoming in check?

Also, why does MX-Tech suggest separating the shortening and the revalving into separate events? Is this because riders need to get used to the way the suspension reacts and determine what, if any, areas of performance need fixed after the shortening?

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For me for trail riding, I loved the feel of having the bike shorter- I stopped dropping it so much. I'm kinda' novice and kinda' slow- only been riding in the dirt for about 5 years, but when I finally shortened my suspension, I was very happy. I didn't notice an increase in harshness- you could always lower the fork oil height a bit, run a touch stiffer spring... And if you do it right (internal spacer and a shorter set of springs), it's all reversible. It's what I do for the SM guys around here.

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